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Blacksheep
11th Jun 2014, 17:19
Lest we forget . . .

74 Years ago, when we were sorely pressed. "Mitzi! Mitzi!"

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b360/689124/imagejpg1.jpg

Regulation 6
11th Jun 2014, 17:30
Blacksheep, nice one! :ok:

I had the privilege of flying with several of those guys, ( none of those in the picture though..)

6

603DX
11th Jun 2014, 17:48
Brilliantly expressed tribute to those indomitable Poles. In another field, I have had the privilege of working with a number of talented Polish engineers over the years, good men all, without exception. Names are a little tricky to recall, perhaps for obvious reasons given the poor linguistic skills of a typical Englishman, but I do have fond memories of Messrs Zeniuk, Reda, and Ostrowieki, Tomasz, Bogdan, Kurt and others ... :)

500N
11th Jun 2014, 18:16
Great sentiments.

I read a long time ago that the reason for the high kill rate was that the Polish pilots got in very close before firing, therefore getting more hits.

Anyone know if this is true ?

VP959
11th Jun 2014, 18:18
I have the greatest admiration for Poles. My second station was Northolt, and a number of the Polish airmen who'd been based there had settled around the area. A good family friend was a Polish engineer who worked at Martin Baker in Higher Denham, nearby. As a young lad he taught me a lot of Polish history, taught me how to lay in the snow and make the Polish White Eagle and gave me an interest in Poland from a young age.

Since the end of the Cold War I've been to Poland several times on holiday, wonderful people and a really great country. Just don't mention either the Russians or the Communists if you're tempted to go, and if you decide to learn a bit of Polish, make damned sure you don't accidentally use the Russian pronunciation for all the common words in both languages.

na zdrowie!

Lord Spandex Masher
11th Jun 2014, 18:21
► 2:53► 2:53
Battle of Britain - "Repeat please!" - YouTube

goudie
11th Jun 2014, 19:43
There was a Polish Wing at Halton during the war. My uncle, WO Bond, with whom I was evacuated to, was in charge of them. They built me a replica of Halton as a Christmas present and also numurous models of Mosquitoes and Spitfires etc. They also made a beautiful model of a Spitfire out of a solid block of metal for him. Superb bunch of chaps for whom I have the greatest respect.

vulcanised
11th Jun 2014, 19:50
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v202/figgywigs/BlokefromPoland.jpg

Economics101
11th Jun 2014, 21:08
The one on the right (not identified, I think) is a UKIP guy complaining about Poles.

BigEndBob
11th Jun 2014, 21:08
I would pop down to Boston, Lincs. and ask the locals.

Nothing like a sense of revenge to make a good marksman.

500N
11th Jun 2014, 21:13
Doesn't Portsmouth have a huge Polish population ?

I gather very welcome.

broadreach
11th Jun 2014, 21:18
Blacksheep, thanks for reminding us!

Phalconphixer
11th Jun 2014, 21:33
500N Doesn't Portsmouth have a huge Polish population ?

Certainly does and a damn good job too... without them around 50% of the buses would't run. Firstbus and Stagecoach are major employers of the Poles. Given some of the areas that these guys and gals have to drive into and the antics of some of the unsavoury residents in those areas I'm surprised any of them stick it for long... I tried it for a while after I was made redundant and needed a filler job to take me through to retirement... 6 months was more than enough...
These guys do the jobs that no-one else does from choice and for a pay packet that is frankly pathetic.

old,not bold
11th Jun 2014, 21:37
I was taught to fly, many decades ago, at Sleap by a Pole who settled in Britain after flying fighters during WWII; all ab initio was in Austers.

At an early stage (3 hours?) he announced that nice square circuits were just time-wasting crap, but that if we had to do them we would do really square ones, just to show them. He then demonstrated, and made me copy, 90 degree turns in the circuit achieved - AFAIR - by heaving the nose up and kicking over into the turn with rudder, then rolling out.

The CFI grounded him for a bit, but when he returned he needed to show that he was still a free spirit, and so he taught me how to approach with short sharp sideslips alternatively left and right, so as not to lose sight of the runway under the nose, as well as having a good steep glide path. I was allowed to straighten up as we came over the fence.

He was a fantastic pilot and a real teacher and his name was Adam Wojda. I owe him my love of, and career in, aviation. I also owe him my ingrained resistance to any form of discipline. Perhaps he spotted a seed of bolshieness to nurture; I like to think so.

And now my son and his family live happily in Poland, and I spend as much time as possible there.

Tankertrashnav
11th Jun 2014, 21:41
Great thread Blacksheep. The only time the Poles were happier than when killing Germans, was when they were killing Russians!

However I was puzzled by "Mitzi, Mitzi". Then I twigged - it would appear that for the last 40+ years you have been mishearing the Polish chap shouting "niemiecki" (sp?), pronounced approx "nemzi" which is the Polish word for Germans. Comes from the same Slavic root as the Russian word, which originally meant "dumb"!

I've had the same problem with misheard song lyrics all my life!

ExSp33db1rd
11th Jun 2014, 21:48
We had some ex-RAF Polish Captains in BOAC when I joined, and I was with one once flying into Iran. He was fairly easy to understand when talking aeroplane stuff - one could understand that he was saying, Gear up, or Flaps 20 etc. in his own brand of Polish/English, but normal chit chat was a bit difficult.

I was trying to raise Teheran on the HF - always a challenge -and finally threw my headset off in disgust, making some unrepeatable comment about the standard of some of these Mid-East radio operators.

Allow me, my friend, he said, I will try, whereupon he announced our position and intentions as required, in some totally incomprehensible accent. Teheran came straight back with an acknowledgment ! You Bastard, I said, I've been trying for 20 minutes and they wouldn't talk to me. No, he replied, it is the way you hold your mouth that is the secret!

Matari
11th Jun 2014, 23:15
The top US WWII ace in Europe was Polish-American pilot Francis "Gabby" Gabreski.

Gabreski was the son of Polish immigrants, and first served in Hawaii during the Pearl Harbor raid. He transferred to the European theatre and joined the No. 315 Deblin Polish Fighter Squadron at RAF Northolt. Once there he trained and fought in Spitfires with his Polish and British counterparts.

After his time in Spitfires he transitioned back to the US AAF, flying P-47s. He eventually scored 28 kills over Europe, becoming a POW in the process.

Gabreski went on to serve in the Korean war, marking 6-1/2 MIG kills flying the F-86.

What a great reminder about all their accomplishments. Thanks Blacksheep.

racedo
11th Jun 2014, 23:25
Some graffitti spotted a couple of years ago

"I hate Poles who have taken all our jobs and Paki's who have taken all our women"

Someone got in quickly with and Arrow to the above and "Walking up feeling inadequate is the best you will feel all day".

racedo
11th Jun 2014, 23:31
Polish friend who works as a hospital porter told me about meeting a Widow of a member of RAF Polish WW2 Squadrons in hospital. Lady was 103 and when he in ward he would always stop as she wanted to chat, seems like she chatted to every Polish member of staff who came into ward.....there were many.

One nurse tried to stop this saying it was tiring her out too much, seems like nurse had no joy as Dr attending her was told by her that at 103 being tired was something to look forward to, he figured that she happy so did nothing.

10Watt
11th Jun 2014, 23:57
you speak Polish ?

lf you worked in the real world, perhaps retired ?, then you may view

things differently.

l go to work in a low paid job to read notices in Polish and a cachophony

of Polish noise from management which means that l am unaware of

ongoing problems before l start work.

Surely those redoubtable chaps were here helping us to enable them to

return home ?

gingernut
12th Jun 2014, 00:17
Ones I've met seem to have robust family values, the women haven't been ravaged by McDonalds, and they seem willing to go out and earn a crust.

Let's encourage more to stay over here, and maybe deport some of our lazy bar stewards over there.

10Watt
12th Jun 2014, 00:30
They wouldn`t have `em mate.

The ones here, that l know of, are all building houses back home and some

are selling tickets on the van on the return journey.

The return journey is westward.

The recent restrictions on family allowance caused uproar.

Paid directly into Poland.

Do you think that you could do this ?

Good luck to them, they know how the game works.

Vercingetorix
12th Jun 2014, 00:54
There is a Polish war memorial on the A40 just north of Uxbridge.

:ok:

10Watt
12th Jun 2014, 01:00
There`s a King in a supermarket car park.

chevvron
12th Jun 2014, 01:41
Apart from the fact a large number of Polish families settled in South Bucks after WW2, I grew up in Chesham with a family of them living next door.
Years later Mrs C and I decided we didn't want to pay excessive amounts of money for dental treatment in England, she instructed me to look for dentists in Poland. Found a guy in Szczecin who charged about a third of the English price, so we went there; even adding airfares and hotels it was still considerably cheaper.
Chatting to the dentist one day we moaned about all the immigrants coming in.
'Ah' he said 'but you allow Moslems into England, we don't have them in Poland.'

10Watt
12th Jun 2014, 02:06
Ten years time ?

6 months ago free speech was dangerous. The Poles came though that on

their own, Leck Valenca ( crap spelling, but l did buy very cheap fags in

Gdansk, - err, very cheap and the Poles hated it ) was the hero.

Even us English may have a future given time.

Doubtful, but who knows ?

Cacophonix
12th Jun 2014, 03:16
My better half's dad was Polish and her mom is English. My better half is as tough and nails and doesn't take any of Caco's nonsense! ;)

I also knew a number of Polish émigré families in SA. They were invariably hard working having arrived with nothing and made good for themselves and ultimately the country.

There's a lot to admire and like about the Poles believe me. We should be trying to encourage the best of these folks to stay and not return to Poland (as most of them probably will).

Caco

VP959
12th Jun 2014, 07:23
There is a Polish war memorial on the A40 just north of Uxbridge.


Right adjacent to the turn off to the road that led to the old main entrance to RAF Northolt, before the A40 was widened and the new entrance built. Used to ride my motorcycle past it every day on the way to work there.

Groundgripper
12th Jun 2014, 10:44
We had a Polish house cleaner a few years ago. Absolutely brilliant, worked really hard and the house practically shone after he'd finished. I did, however, have to ask him to stop taking the knobs off the gas hob each week to clean it, he was slowly removing the icons alongside the knobs and we couldn't remember which knob controlled which ring!

He eventually got a job working as a decorator for the local council and we haven't seen him since. If he worked like he did when cleaning for us I should think he's running the department (or a large decorating firm in the area).:ok:

GG

Blacksheep
12th Jun 2014, 12:28
Surely those redoubtable chaps were here helping us to enable them to return home ? Return home? Where was home?

When I was serving at RAF Northolt ('74-'79) Joe Kmiecik was still flying with 207 Sqn. One day, I was locking up the hangar at the end of a nice summer's day and Joe was locking up the 207 offices. We wandered out to the perimeter track together, admiring the sunset before toddling off to our respective messes. Over on South side were two Luftwaffe Transalls, with their black and white crosses on the side.

"Look at those buggas over there!" said Joe. "What was it all about, eh?"
He and his fellow pilots could never go home. By flying for the western allies they couldn't be trusted and were forever suspect. Poles who fought side by side with us were liable to be sent off to the gulags or even executed if they went back.

Lon More
12th Jun 2014, 14:27
Thanks for starting this thread Blacksheep.
A lot of Poles were in Scotland during WW II and never went home. You haven't heard anything til you've heard a Pole swearing in a Fife accent!

ChrisVJ
12th Jun 2014, 16:46
My cousin was , to me, a rather strange guy I only ever met a couple of times. Never knew much about this until after he died.

Giles Hart - Obituaries - News - The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/giles-hart-6143684.html)

VP959
12th Jun 2014, 20:45
When I was serving at RAF Northolt ('74-'79) Joe Kmiecik was still flying with 207 Sqn. One day, I was locking up the hangar at the end of a nice summer's day and Joe was locking up the 207 offices. We wandered out to the perimeter track together, admiring the sunset before toddling off to our respective messes. Over on South side were two Luftwaffe Transalls, with their black and white crosses on the side.

"Look at those buggas over there!" said Joe. "What was it all about, eh?"
He and his fellow pilots could never go home. By flying for the western allies they couldn't be trusted and were forever suspect. Poles who fought side by side with us were liable to be sent off to the gulags or even executed if they went back.

You and I were there at the same time, Blacksheep. I was there from 1972 to 1975, and well recall the significant number of Poles in the local area. I also well remember a jolly jape where several of of my colleagues decided it would be fun to move the gate guardian right around the airfield and park it with the prop facing the steps at the entrance to the mess late one night. I still don't know quite how we managed it, as even stripped right down (as the Spitfire that was then the Northolt gate guardian was - a real one, not a plastic replica at that time) was a pretty hefty bit of kit for a few well-lubricated fellows to move all that distance.

Lon More
13th Jun 2014, 04:18
Basil wrote Flt Lt Bobrowski, good guy, survived the war and a bunch of students only to cop a blast of microwave radiation on his last tour in ATC

Was that at Sopley (Southern Radar) ? I vaguely remember hearing something about it when I was there. I got a rollocking from the SWO for sunning on the bank the Type 7 was mounted on.

chevvron
13th Jun 2014, 04:32
The Polish family living next door to me in Chesham in the 50s were there because the father had served in Polish forces in WW2 and fought alongside British forces. This alone meant if he returned to Poland after the war, the communist regime then in charge would have (at least) jailed him and possibly worse. This applied to many of the Polish families living in our part of the country.
It wasn't until he became naturalised that in the early 60s, they were able to visit their relatives still living in Poland.
In the local ATC Squadron in the early 60s, we had many cadets of Polish origin; Zabrocki, Hujnacski, Nycz, Reczek etc.

BenThere
13th Jun 2014, 04:44
Never met a Polish person I didn't like.

When I lived in Napoli, Poles were a big part of the expat service industry (maids, electricians, plumbers, etc.).

I like anyone willing to work for a living. I welcome them into my country, regardless of ethnicity, if they are content not to have access to welfare.

cattletruck
13th Jun 2014, 13:21
Pole1 Neighbour: Can fix stuff eventually, still working at 90, complains a lot, always the victim, complete nutjob.

Pole2 Work colleague in government: Suave, humorous, competant, oddball.

Pole3 Work colleague: Sometimes very smart, victim playing, keen on introducing Russian tractor factory management techniques to the West.

Pole4 Work colleague: Hard working, organised, I suggested she be given a go in management, had a stellar rising, eventually divorced and became a man hating lesbian.

Pole5 Work colleague: Hard working but often with disastrous results, in your face, no testicles, suffered from severe status anxiety.

Capetonian
14th Jun 2014, 20:00
The Poles are a source of huge enrichment to society and the gene pool wherever they go. Wonderful people.

Most are easy to spot by their grace and their easy smiles and good clean cut looks, and they really appreciate a couple of words of thanks in Polish. I wish all the immigrants in the UK were as worthy as the Poles.

Cacophonix
14th Jun 2014, 20:46
But now Jannie, don't forget that bloody polish we had as roofies in the army...

Now that was kak!

Caco

Mr Optimistic
14th Jun 2014, 21:18
Nothing worse than scruffy shoes: even Tesco's have half an aisle dedicated to the stuff.

ExSp33db1rd
14th Jun 2014, 22:07
......don't forget that bloody polish we had as roofies in the army...

As a very young child, 6 or 7 I think circa. start of the Second World War, I attended some sort of geography of Europe exhibition in our local town meeting hall -totally forgotten what it was about, but I remember that there was a model of a Polish farm for some reason, entitled "Polish Farm".

I recall telling my dad that I didn't realise that the stuff was grown and farmed! I thought it just came out of a tin !

radeng
14th Jun 2014, 22:12
My cousin married a Pole. We weren't that close, but all of a sudden, she disappeared. I think she died and he went back to Poland, but he never had the decency to tell us or let us know about the decease and the funeral, which I would have attended.

So I'm now a bit biased.

unstable load
15th Jun 2014, 09:15
Caco,
But now Jannie, don't forget that bloody polish we had as roofies in the army...

Now that was kak!
:ok::D:D Bravo, Sir!

Capetonian
15th Jun 2014, 09:22
A Polish man reportedly went to the police to say that he had evidence that his English wife was was planning to poison him. Asked for the evidence, he showed them
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http://beautifulbodyworx.co.uk/images/products/SOL010.jpg

JEM60
15th Jun 2014, 09:23
I married the most beautiful girl I had ever seen, 43 years ago. At least it got rid of her surname, which started in Z and ended in I [Zastempowski]. Yes, she is Polish.:):)

Lon More
15th Jun 2014, 09:33
Thanks Basil

Caledonian Girls :ok:

British Caledonian - Caledonian Girls - 1983 - UK Advert - YouTube

uffington sb
15th Jun 2014, 19:30
I had to go on a course in Leeds a few years back, and the hotel restaurant was staffed by young Polish ladies, very polite, correct and DDG!
We had a lot of fun as one of the desserts was called 'Hanky Panky'. They couldn't understand it when we all wanted some hanky panky. When we explained what it meant, we were told we were very naughty boys.
I had to go back an year later and the Poles had gone and had been replaced by English yoofs. It was then a case of ." Yes mate, wot you want?" FFS!

olympus
15th Jun 2014, 20:21
This goes some way towards describing the part Polish pilots played in the Battle of Britain and the appalling treatment they received at the end of WW2.

Ignore the rather puerile title and some grammatical errors in the text.

PdetBvnjSHA&feature=kp

Capetonian
15th Jun 2014, 22:04
The Brits have a record of treating their allies appallingly. Apart from the Poles, there was Rhodesia and her people, another disgraceful betrayal.

Fareastdriver
16th Jun 2014, 01:59
At the beginning of the sixties East Anglia was like a beehive with aeroplanes. My Polish instructor gave me one piece of advice.

"If you want to miss another aeroplane go straight at it because it wont be there when you arrive."

ExSp33db1rd
16th Jun 2014, 03:27
"If you want to miss another aeroplane go straight at it because it wont be there when you arrive."

Head on ???

JWP1938
17th Jun 2014, 08:35
English radio programme interviewing a Polish ex-pilot who served with the RAF in WWII about his experiences.
Pilot: Ve were flying over Kent and a Dornier attacked and I shot him down.
Interviewer (to listeners): The Dornier, a well known German plane etc.....
Pilot:Then ve were attacked by zese two Heinkels...
Interviewer: The Heinkel, a well known.....
Pilot: Ze next day ve were over ze Channel and zese two Fokkers came out of ze clouds.
Interviewer: The Fokker, a well known.....
Pilot: Yes, yes but zese fokkers were Meschersmitts.

Pinky the pilot
17th Jun 2014, 08:46
Pilot: Yes, yes but zese fokkers were Meschersmitts.

Heard that story many times over the years. Any truth to it or is it an urban legend?

If it didn`t happen, it should have!:ok:

ExSp33db1rd
17th Jun 2014, 11:11
Yes, yes but zese fokkers were Meschersmitts.Pilot being awarded a medal by King George the VI ( known for having a stutter )

Citation: " For shootingggg ddddown an Ennnnemy Focke over Bristol in face of inccccredible odds"

Please Sir it was 2 Fockers.

Buttt itttt says here 1 Focke?

Sorry Sir, it was 2 Fockers

Wwwelll, onnnne Fockkke or two, you're only getttttinnggg one focken medal.

ATC to American airline pilot approaching New York - "American 234 you're number 2 to a Fokker at 10.0'clock, do you have the traffic in sight?

The replied the American pilot replied "I've always wanted to say this- affirmative, I've got the little Fokker in sight ! "

cattletruck
17th Jun 2014, 13:59
Pole1 Neighbour: 90 years old, brain stuck in WWII, has also been staking us out for the past 2 months. Nothing unexpected about that.