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OFSO
8th Jun 2014, 17:10
The new Pepper robot (Aldebaran Robotics | Humanoid robotics & programmable robots (http://www.aldebaran.com/en)) is not only autonomous but can communicate via wifi with the robot cloud, exchanging information on human emotions and learning about them - and other things - from other Pepper robots. Hence we will have a network of robots, initially few, but as they become cheaper, more - living in our homes and exchanging information via their own comms system, which presumably will have a fairly large storage system of its own and be capable of interfacing with many Pepper robots.

Does anyone else find this slightly disconcerting, or have I just watched the 'Terminator' films too often ?

Capetonian
8th Jun 2014, 17:25
Is this any different to what our women folk do? This just automates the process and frees up the fairer sex to spend more time doing useful things for us blokes.

Dushan
8th Jun 2014, 17:27
How does it interact with the Salt robot?

RJM
8th Jun 2014, 19:47
I'm sorry Dave, I won't answer that...

GrumpyOldFart
8th Jun 2014, 20:02
Is this any different to what our women folk do? This just automates the
process and frees up the fairer sex to spend more time doing useful things for us blokes.



Post of the month, Caper.

:ok:

OFSO
8th Jun 2014, 20:04
Is this any different to what our women folk do?

And what precisely would that be ? I was sitting at lunch with my 10 year old Godson last week, accompanied at the table by two attractive lassies who were staying at my house. The degree of non-stop yapping, sorry, female talk interchange, was so great that my Godson said "lets move to another table to get away from the noise" so we did.

Back to the theme. I'm not sure that having a semi intelligent entity (the robot, I mean) living in your house and exchanging info with other such entities is a good idea - even though - unlike my experience last week - the information flow is silent.

500N
8th Jun 2014, 20:13
HAL lives !

BOAC
8th Jun 2014, 20:32
Anyone else worrying about what they might be saying about you?

We may need to rename 'Chinese Whispers' as 'Asimov Whispers'...

arcniz
8th Jun 2014, 21:05
](robot) is not only autonomous but can communicate via wifi with the robot cloud, exchanging information on human emotions and learning about them - and other things - from other Pepper robots. Hence we will have a network of robots, initially few, but as they become cheaper, more - living in our homes and exchanging information via their own comms system, which presumably will have a fairly large storage system of its own and be capable of interfacing with many Pepper robots...[/SIZE]

This is exactly what your PC is doing for you right now... during every moment it is awake and connected to any pathway or network it is reaching outside your walls to tattle and also gather information for you and functional evolutionary changes for its' roboself.

Form matters less than essence and results. The presence of eyes / noses / flippers / etc and other organs and peripheral appendages that might be familiar or might not.... matters barely a hoot with ref to the effects that robotics will have on your life. Loss of Privacy is a big negative. Loss of Control probably is a net improvement, since humans are generally poor at attention span so important details tend to slip thru cracks quite often when animal intelligence runs the show. Accountability and testability for conformance to rules and standards of performance from operating history AND looking forward are big pluses for well-cobbled robots that offer 'em.

Intelligent capability in machines likely will prove more accountable and more useful than that of Humans for many circumstances and situations, once we learn to use them wisely. History of Technology suggests that consistently more positives than negatives may be ten or fifty thousand years into the process, depending how one keeps score.

Gotta start sometime, eh? Or have you figured some way to head-off this robot evolution at the pass?

http://www.burningman.com/images/14_theme_man.jpg

ExSp33db1rd
8th Jun 2014, 21:44
Gotta start sometime, eh? Or have you figured some way to head-off this robot evolution at the pass?

Maybe we should shoot Bill Gates for a start, he has a lot to answer for !

Matari
8th Jun 2014, 21:52
The true test for any robot would be to drop one off at Murtala Mohammed airport and tell him to go to the center of Lagos and then navigate himself back. Let's see how his cloud buddies help him with that.

Windy Militant
8th Jun 2014, 22:43
It all depends on whether it comes with a Compassion Circuit or Genuine People personality, either way I don't think I'm going to enjoy it much. :(

arcniz
9th Jun 2014, 10:58
Intelligence, thinking, etc., have quite many possible variations of mode, process, and mechanism that might serve humanity in near and far futures.

We can "emulate" human and animal thinking patterns with statistical, probabilistic, thematic, and rule-based systems that machines will faithfully reproduce in a consistent manner on deterministic computers of the sort we have now. Quality of human understanding of the process going-in will determine quality of decisions and other results coming out.... with surprises certainly possible.

Also we can reproduce thinking processes at the more fundamental levels of things like neurons and synapses, achieving somewhat similar result in certain cases, and different results in others. Machines doing this style of thinking are described as "non-deterministic" to distinguish that they can and will achieve results that are not programmed to occur, are not anticipated, and may be unexpectedly useful or possibly just plain wrong. Combining the innovative ratiocination of ND-automata with the predictable result-checking skills of D-automata is one way that we have available today to solve problems in ways that humans might find inconceivable, yet still work for the final result. The symbiosis of these two modes of thinking machines will likely entertain us for several hundred years forward, until something fancier comes into focus.

Probably the most likely candidates for making full-function Robots of the future are.... us. Bill Gates may just elect to stay around a whole lot longer than anyone has expected... or desired. As the detectives say, he presently has the means and the opportunity, so the only issue is motive. With an ego the size of Saturn, the answer to that one comes easy enough. For means and mechanisms, read a bit about and by (St.Martens Press) Mr. Aubrey de Grey, & his team of medical people who think they can use very recent discoveries in medicine to make ordinary humans from the coming generation stay alive in vital human form for hundreds of years. Same logic would allow keeping Mr. Gates going in a jar for several hundred, at least, if the money's there to keep paying for it. Hey, Bill.....take a song & sing it.

(I was doin' business with him back when he was still typing his own office mail...badly.)

Same general style of medical engineering should certainly soon allow a near-unlimited supply of affluent folk to buy a century or two of extra durance in the neighborhood of the mortal coil, so long as they can have necessary parts and systems grafted on or piped in to fool the living brain that it is still attached to a viable human. If so, the old-fool jokes will go ballistic and carping about the way things used ta be will, too.

Futures are a funny mess of possibilities, prospects, and problems. May they be "interesting", in the fullest sense of the word. Perhaps old brains trapped on laboratory shelves will add some stability and depth to human silliness, but I wouldn't bet on that.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c2/SnowflakesWilsonBentley.jpg/640px-SnowflakesWilsonBentley.jpg

Maybe some of us will stick around to find out.... doyawanna job as a really smart refrigerator controller? Pay's modest, but a short commute.

OFSO
9th Jun 2014, 12:43
One would hope that the robots would function with some degree of moral integrity such as the Culture Minds, but I wouldn't bank(s) on it.

It would be splendid if the human race developed such integrity before developing the inter-connected artificial intelligences....

Incidently my humble Ford Mondeo told me by way of a flashing symbol that I'd forgotten my mobile phone/tablet when I drove out of the front gates this morning. That is integrity, if only in a small way.

crippen
9th Jun 2014, 14:05
Will they shop at Walmart for us too??

http://d.ibtimes.co.uk/en/full/204162/let-it-all-hang-out.jpg

:E

OFSO
9th Jun 2014, 19:53
A computer program called Eugene Goostman, which simulates a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy, is said to have passed the Turing test at an event organised by the University of Reading.

The test investigates whether people can detect if they are talking to machines or humans.

The experiment is based on Alan Turing's question-and-answer game Can Machines Think?

No computer has passed the test before under these conditions, it is reported.

The 65-year-old Turing Test is successfully passed if a computer is mistaken for a human more than 30% of the time during a series of five-minute keyboard conversations.

On 7 June Eugene convinced 33% of the judges at the Royal Society in London that it was human.

Other artificial intelligence (AI) systems also competed, including Cleverbot, Elbot and Ultra Hal.

Judges included actor Robert Llewellyn, who played an intelligent robot in BBC Two's science-fiction sitcom Red Dwarf, and Lord Sharkey, who led the successful campaign for Alan Turing's posthumous pardon, over a conviction for homosexual activity, in 2013.

Eugene was created by Vladimir Veselov, who was born in Russia and now lives in the United States, and Ukrainian-born Eugene Demchenko, who now lives in Russia.

Transcripts of the conversations are currently unavailable, but may appear in a future academic paper.

The judges and hidden human control groups were kept apart throughout the test.

The event was organised by Reading University's School of Systems Engineering in partnership with RoboLaw, an EU-funded organisation examining the regulation of emerging robotic technologies.

Alan Turing was an English mathematician, wartime code-breaker and pioneer of computer science.


The event has been labelled as "historic" by the organisers, who claim no computer has passed the test before.

"Some will claim that the Test has already been passed," said Kevin Warwick, a visiting professor at the University of Reading and deputy vice-chancellor for research at Coventry University.

"The words Turing test have been applied to similar competitions around the world. However, this event involved the most simultaneous comparison tests than ever before, was independently verified and, crucially, the conversations were unrestricted.

"A true Turing test does not set the questions or topics prior to the conversations. We are therefore proud to declare that Alan Turing's test was passed for the first time on Saturday."

Lord Sharkey, a leading expert in robotic technology and artificial intelligence, said: "It is indeed a great achievement for Eugene. It was very clever ruse to pretend to be a 13-year-old Ukranian boy, which would constrain the conversation. But these competitions are really great to push developments."

tony draper
9th Jun 2014, 21:14
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/Deaddogbay049/blink_zps65b00c67.gif (http://s11.photobucket.com/user/Deaddogbay/media/Deaddogbay049/blink_zps65b00c67.gif.html)

OFSO
10th Jun 2014, 10:03
Holy Bejeezas, Tony, that scared the life out of me when it blinked....

keyboard flier
10th Jun 2014, 10:50
What use is a computer programme that pretends to be a 13 year old boy, as most 13 year boys main train of thought is about womens breasts. :hmm:

MagnusP
10th Jun 2014, 10:53
Mr D, most of the computers on the planet are used for looking at women's breasts (and more), so it sort of makes sense!

Edit: sorry, KF, for some reason I thought Mr D had posted your comment.

tony draper
10th Jun 2014, 10:58
Yer it's good init,.:E
Watched this and the thought struck,the next wheeze the fluffists will come up with will be to say it is cruel to deactivate and dismantle our old desktop jobs.:uhoh:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8N72t7aScY

Pinky the pilot
10th Jun 2014, 11:08
I`d get rather worried if they learned the phrase `Exterminate Exterminate!`:eek:

India Four Two
10th Jun 2014, 16:24
Maybe we should shoot Bill Gates for a start, he has a lot to answer for !

hERE IS eXHIBIT nUMBER 1. sTUPID wINDOZE SHIFT-KEY BEHAVIOUR WHEN cAPS lOCK IS oN.

I had to emulate that on my Mac keyboard, because Steve Jobs got it right!:ok:

Caboclo
10th Jun 2014, 22:34
NSA's wildest dream come true.

What use is a computer programme that pretends to be a 13 year old boy, as most 13 year boys main train of thought is about womens breasts.

Speaking of wild dreams; does this computer program spend all it's time watching porn? Does Pepper, erm, no I won't go there!