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airship
17th May 2014, 21:31
British cuisine is increasingly "simple and violent (http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-china-blog-27442398)".

Apart from my general agreement (excluding fresh pork pies, Scotch eggs and baked beans, all of which are difficult to come by here), I tend to generally agree. Unsure about the numbers of Chinese tourists in UK, but here in France, their custom is taken very seriously...?!

Suffice to say that neither Selfriges or their French equivalents ca. 2014 would willingly welcome folks calling these customers frequenting their stores by the usual derogatory terms.

"This is the highlight of Britain's dark cuisine," said one microblogger. Another posted: "I envy them. At least they don't have to crack their minds every day thinking what to eat for the next meal."

What do you have to say in the defense of British cuisine (if anything)...?! ;)

tony draper
17th May 2014, 21:43
We conquered three quarters of the World on it? whilst the French the Chinese and Indians got their arses kicked on a regular basis on their cuisine?
:E

pigboat
17th May 2014, 21:45
What do you have to say in the defense of British cuisine...
When I visited Great Britain last I thought it was great. All except the bacon, it was only mediocre.

..and now the Chinese...

Right.

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m8/Siddley-Hawker/menu_zps85503fa2.jpg

airship
17th May 2014, 21:47
That's because the "best British bacon" (and the cheapest) comes from, uhmmm, Denmark... :ok:

PS. We conquered three quarters of the World on it?. Are you absolutely 100% sure that Lawrence of Arabia or most of the troops there at the time benefitted from 2 eggs, fried sausages and mash when going up against their foes back then...?!

500N
17th May 2014, 21:49
But that still doesn't make it good !


British or English cuisine - not a huge amount to crow about.

Scotch eggs
Roasts
Yorkshire pud


The food is good but nothing exceptional.

I will say that at least they give good portions and not nouvelle cuisine :O

500N
17th May 2014, 21:51
Having eaten various wild pork, the flavour seems to vary cording to what they have eaten.

TomJoad
17th May 2014, 22:38
We conquered three quarters of the World on it? whilst the French the Chinese and Indians got their arses kicked on a regular basis on their cuisine?
:E

:D:D:D Well said Mr Draper. There is more than a wee bit of pretentious crap talked about the excellence of various national cuisines.

Dushan
17th May 2014, 22:42
I think it contains Brussels Sprouts, so expect con-pilot to be by, shortly, to tell you how much he enjoyed it while living there.

glad rag
17th May 2014, 22:54
One thing you soon realise about @ships supposed superiority is that it has come at a price indeed.........




having seen many ex pats fall into the same routine I do understand the old buggah, here have a fish

superq7
17th May 2014, 23:59
I think a traditional British Sunday roast dinner is hard to beat, sprouts being optional of course! there again some people might prefer frogs legs with frites, but maybe @ship has a recipe to share ? :)

Capetonian
18th May 2014, 00:02
Good old British cuisine. Curry and chips, pizza and chips, spag bog and chips ...........

Seriously, whatever one may say about British cuisine, many of the world's best chefs (and I'm not talking about little cockney gits like Jamie Olivier and posers like Nigella Lawson) are Brits. The French have had their superiority blown out of the water long ago.

con-pilot
18th May 2014, 00:04
When I started flying back to England after living there during my formative years, I was shocked just how hard it was to find proper fish and chips. :(

In fact, I didn't find a good, proper meal of fish and chips until last year while on holiday in Ireland, in a Pub on a small island.

Actually the fish and chips were way passed good, they were excellent. I swear to God it tasted like the fish had been swimming around in the ocean that morning. And fresh cut potatoes for the chips. :ok:

ruddman
18th May 2014, 00:18
I'd take butter chicken over 'bangers and mash' anyday.

Sorry.

Shannon volmet
18th May 2014, 00:20
Perhaps they should have sampled some of the sh1t that local 'Chinese' take away's sell throughout the UK before they spoke. Who was it that said, "The Chinese will eat anything that has legs, as long as it's not a chair or a table"?

500N
18th May 2014, 00:41
"Seriously, whatever one may say about British cuisine, many of the world's best chefs are Brits. "


Name a few ?

Plenty of good and very good chefs around, not from the UK.

meadowrun
18th May 2014, 00:44
In all cookery there are stars and flops. The kind of food I dislike most is pretentious food. That is, essentially. any food where the chef utilizes tweezers in the preparation and more attention is paid to final visual extravaganza than the honest transformation of good quality ingredients into well cooked meals. That and paying through the nose for the "artistic" processes and expensive real estate.


There are a large number of very good English restaurants. Enough to rival Paris and certainly Shanghai.

oldpax
18th May 2014, 00:53
If you eat at roadside stalls or eg., filling stations etc then you will find around a basic ten dishes .Nothing like you find in Thai restaurants!However go to a bigger place in the evening and then you can see a different menu entirely.Your basic roadside menu is chicken and rice, beef soup with noodles or a spicy minced pork ,also the spicey salad called som tam which is to be found everywhere.There many British restaurants here and you can get the usual fare but not many Thais will be in evidence there!!!

West Coast
18th May 2014, 00:54
More importantly, where's the best fish and chips in Dublin? I remember as a kid spending my summers in Eire hitting some really good places in the Dalkey area, same for Dun Laoghaire.
Want to introduce the kids to proper fish and chips on the next visit late this summer.

V2-OMG!
18th May 2014, 00:56
It's not so much what you eat, but how many times you eat/day that confuses me.

I once had a very nice "British high-tea" at a swank North American hotel.
The tea was served at 5 p.m. We "dined" or "tea'd?" on finger sandwiches, green salad, tons of pastries, and more substantial items like mini beef pies, sausage rolls, and a huge pork/beef meat-loaf covered in pastry. I considered it a "meal" - dinner! BTW, I enjoyed every bite - very tasty. Nothing to "ridicule."

From reading this forum (and other sources) you also have "supper." (I am assuming after "tea" or "high tea.") So, do you eat 4X/day: Breakfast. Lunch. Tea/High Tea. Supper??

Can someone please explain the typical UK meal schedule to me?

Ta!

superq7
18th May 2014, 01:22
V2

Breakfast, self explanatory.

Lunch, some call it dinner.

Dinner, some call it evening meal.

Supper,

Snack in between if you want to put on weight !

Regards, Stuart.

evansb
18th May 2014, 01:32
What is "Tea" then?...a meal of some sort I do believe, normally eaten between 4pm and 6pm. Why name a meal after a beverage I'll never understand.

onetrack
18th May 2014, 01:37
British cuisine - Chip butties smothered in tomato sauce or gravy. Only the British could appreciate something like that.

However - I understand the British invented fish and chips. Now there's something that saved their food reputation.

V2-OMG!
18th May 2014, 01:42
Thanks, stuart, but like evansb, I'm still confused. When I was visiting Oz, they called their 5 - 6 p.m. meal "tea" and did not have another meal after that.

JimR
18th May 2014, 01:48
I couldn't agree more C-P. Fish and chips in England are just not the same anymore. Big problem seems to be that the fish are not fresh but have probably been frozen. The fish meat I remember from my youth would slide apart; it didn't need a knife. I can only comment about the south, so maybe the north (Draper country?) is different. Another thing I notice that some of the more acceptable shops are actually run by forriners.

ruddman
18th May 2014, 01:51
Is it local fish over there?

Here it's all flake and anything else the price goes up considerably and it's no guarantee its local.

I was at one that never had ANY local fresh fish. All important and it was in fishing town.

Disgraceful.

bosnich71
18th May 2014, 02:06
When I arrived in Oz,40 years ago, the main item on just about every Aussie menu was "Chicken Parmagiana", and FFS it still is.
And they eat chips at 8 o'clock in the morning !

CoodaShooda
18th May 2014, 02:09
Come to Darwin, Ruddman.

We have a former, multi gold plate award, al la carte restaurant that turned itself into a fish and chipperie. Same standard of food preparation but with local caught, fresh fish at fish and chip shop prices. :ok:

onetrack
18th May 2014, 02:12
ruddman - You're not wrong there. Over 60% of Australia's fish consumption is now imported - yet we're surrounded by the largest oceans in the world with some of the finest fish types.
The problem is that huge numbers of other countries rape our fish supplies from those oceans.
The imported fish we get is pure garbage, produced in polluted Asian fish factories and in polluted rivers. :yuk: :yuk: :yuk:

The first question I ask as soon as I sit down in a local pub, cafe or restaurant, is - "where's your fish from? - imported or local?"
Sometimes there's a lot of hedging before the answer is produced - sometimes they lie outright - and sometimes they tell you straight-out whether they only supply local fish.

I'll pay extra to eat local fish, but many restaurants seem to think that selling local fish is a licence to print money, and double the price for the local "gourmet varieties" of fish.

We buy our fish from a local "van man" who sells both local and imported fish and both fresh and frozen. Amazingly, some of our local fish is sent to Asia for processing and then returned to us, because of high local labour costs, and an inability to source local processing labour.

ruddman
18th May 2014, 02:12
Sounds good. I do love being out on the pier their enjoying the seafood and ambience when its packed.

onetrack
18th May 2014, 02:15
Cood Shooda - Right on. Darwins local fish supply and the range of restaurants is outstanding.
The little fish and chip shop in the Arcade in Mitchell St alongside Coles, that sells a feed of Barramundi and chips for about $14 or $15, is up at the top of our fondest fish-feed memories.

500N
18th May 2014, 02:34
Fish and Chips in Darwin are superb.

The Fish and Chippery on the old wharf, had some last time I was up there and couldn't believe the taste.

It does help that Darwin has plenty of easily caught fish !!! LOL

Just wish they would let us have a go at the crocodiles :O


Funnily enough, went to a place in Geelong that was on a specially built
shed over the bay and they had superb fish and chips as well.

Far better than the local Melbourne places.

Almost all are run by Foreigners, mostly Chinese.

ruddman
18th May 2014, 02:53
Must admit though that in Cairns and Port Douglas, there is some unbelievable caught local reef fish which is some of the best in the world. I said 'some' for those defending their counties local fish. But it's good. Trust me. :)

I had some Red Emperor in Port Douglas that was the nicest fish I've ever had. Was like butter. Cooked to perfection. Had the same in a Cairns restaurant that was terrible. Overlooked and dry.

Had some freshly caught - only minutes earlier by brother in law and may or may not have been undersized...ahem - barramundi that was sensational.


Many countries - shall remain nameless - say how good their fish is. But aussie fish is sensational. My wife and I used to by Flathead tails at the Melbourne Markets and shed crumb them. As tasty as many overseas fish I've had that many consider top shelf. And a flathead ain't considered top shelf here!!


That was long. I've had too many tequilas and beer. Thank goodness for ipad auto spelling g becaus ps tha would a,l be gibberish. Haha.

:ok:

cavortingcheetah
18th May 2014, 03:04
The word Cuisine which implies art and creativity seems altogether utterly inappropriate when used in the context of cooking in Britain.

500N
18th May 2014, 03:27
ruddman

I agree. Flathead tails are superb.

As is Snapper and some of the other bay fish.

I really like Whiting.

evansb
18th May 2014, 04:17
The 2014 Michelin Guide for restaurants in the Uk and The Republic of Ireland lists the following:

4 Three Star in England all located in London

19 Two Star in England

1 Two Star in Scotland

1 Two Star in Ireland

53 One Star restaurants in London

63 One Star restaurants in the rest of England

15 One Star restaurants in Scotland

3 One Star restaurants in Wales

8 One Star restaurants in The Republic of Ireland

impressive.

meadowrun
18th May 2014, 04:27
......."sells a feed of Barramundi and chips for about $14 or $15"


Struth mate.


British Columbia - typical - Fresh cod and chips - $7.00...... Fresh halibut and chips - $8.00...well, I'm assuming fresh...tastes like it, looks like it, but have never asked.

ruddman
18th May 2014, 04:45
Welcome to Australia. Home to overpriced everything.

onetrack
18th May 2014, 04:46
meadowrun, you sure know how to make me envious. :{ But this sort of pricing is excellent in Oz - where restaurants regularly charge $35 for a "premium" local fish feed. :{

Of course, we all know the title of this thread should actually read, "British cuisine improved by the French, Indians, and now the Chinese... :E

meadowrun
18th May 2014, 05:00
"British cuisine improved by the" French, "Indians, and now the Chinese..".


And if you get UK Border Force (Youtube, if interested) ......mostly the restaurants are staffed by illegal aliens for authenticity.

mikedreamer787
18th May 2014, 06:18
The problem is that huge numbers of other countries rape our fish supplies.....


I didn't know foreign fishing vessel crews raped your fish! :bored:

Certainly a Barramundi would put up one a hell of a fight though...

500N
18th May 2014, 06:24
"Welcome to Australia. Home to overpriced everything."

Was having breakfast this morning, home cooked, Bacon, scrambled eggs
on Toasted Turkish Bread, Coffee and Juice. GF commented that it would
have been a minimum $35 meal if we had gone out to eat it :rolleyes:

meadowrun
18th May 2014, 06:30
You need some diners or some Denny's. Bacon, eggs, hash browns, reg. toast, coffee. $12.00 for two at local diner, $8.00 if you catch the early-bird special before 0900. Maybe it's just real estate that's uber expensive here.

500N
18th May 2014, 06:35
No, it's the wages as well.

mikedreamer787
18th May 2014, 06:36
Bloody expensive alright 500!

Was down there not too long ago in
MEL and SYD few days and couldn't
get over how any form of grub now
costs a bloody fortune. How does
anyone survive?

Sydney - nice resty in town. Not in
any way upmarket. Just a 2 course
dinner for two (me and a mate) of
good quality food but bugger all on
the plate. One beer each.

Total? 153 bucks for shit's sake! :*

Melbourne - counter lunch at a pub
in Essendon (just me). Nothing at
all fancy but bugger all on the plate
again. Two beers from the tap.

47 bucks! :ugh:

500N
18th May 2014, 06:45
Mike

I think you need to look before you buy, those are 4 or 5 star prices.

Find the right pub and you can get a good meal for a good price.

B Fraser
18th May 2014, 09:09
I saw a sign outside a Chinese restaurant that said "Come For Breakfast". Those Chinese will cook anything.

Take a walk around the deep freeze section of a Chinese supermarket. There are things for sale that are unknown to science.

Worrals in the wilds
18th May 2014, 09:40
Find the right pub and you can get a good meal for a good price.
Or a club; they subsidise the food so you'll come in and then play the pokies. If you enjoy the food and dodge the gambling you can do well. :E

bosnich71
18th May 2014, 10:25
Ruddman..... "and a Flathead ain't considered top shelf".....around here in Victoria it's certainly what I consider expensive,then again I'm a poor pensioner.

Metro man
18th May 2014, 11:00
Eating out in Australia has become so ridiculously expensive that I rent a place with a small kitchen so I can prepare most of my own meals when I go there on holiday. A few years ago a cafe on the strip in Freemantle had spaghetti bolognaise at $35 as it's cheapest main dish.

500N
18th May 2014, 11:17
Bos

You live near done of the best flathead fishing,
You need to go catch some yourself ! :O

Fliegenmong
18th May 2014, 11:59
Quote: No, it's the wages as well.

They're required to meet the ever increasing cost of living here!! Pointless having multiple investment properties, if you can't rent them out!

In the QF crew hotel in Perth last year........the hotel restaurant advertising on the wall of the elevator was for $75 steaks!! :eek: I was tempted to call up and ask if one received the whole beast for that price!!

Quote: Take a walk around the deep freeze section of a Chinese supermarket. There are things for sale that are unknown to science.

Great isn't it?

I understand that the bulk of quality Oz Seafood goes O/S. Any good quality Oz seafood consumed here would be by politicians only!

I am too impatient to fish the local rivers, but Mrs Fliegs will from time to time........generally bagging Silver Bream, whiting or Flathead.....all of which when cleaned and consumed within the hour, are incredible!...Almost 'sweet' :ok:

500N
18th May 2014, 12:02
I believe you are correct in that our seafood does go O/S

At the price they get for Tuna, they can have it :rolleyes:

Windy Militant
18th May 2014, 12:11
A few years ago some friends of my mums went for a ruby wedding anniversary meal at a highly recommended restaurant. The place was given rave reviews in the papers had been mentioned on telly the whole banana.
When they got there the food arrived on huge plates, but what they got at vast expense, was as they described it to mum as a piece of meat the size of a shilling and a couple of carrots the size of match sticks surrounded by a bunch of squiggles! Needless to say they were not impressed and stopped on the way home to buy fish and chips!
Personally I prefer the type of cafe not far from home on the coast road which serves farmers food in industrial quantities. It's nothing fancy but plain home cooked fare which, as the owners of the Caffi, it is welsh, also have a farm the food is seasonal, fresh and local. The place is always full whenever you go there with mix of customers from local trades men, pensioners, young families both local and holiday makers. Oh yeah and no sgiggles there's no room on the plates.:ok:

Metro man
18th May 2014, 12:20
Some places try to justify their prices by providing oversize portions instead. Charge a high price but hope the customer reconciles it with the quantity of food provided even though it's far in excess of what he wants.

At a coffee shop I will share one slice of cake with the wife and be quite happy with that. At a fish and chip shop in New Zealand recently we ordered a half portion of chips between us with our fish fillets and didn't finish it.

I would rather have a reasonable portion size at a lower cost but that would affect the owners profit margin.

alicopter
18th May 2014, 12:26
There can be good food in the UK but you pay the price for it!!!! I think the secret of a good dish is the freshness of its ingredients.... Drive through the countryside of France or Italy, and you will be able to pick on the roadside some products coming from the field behind the stall.... or from the farm next to it.... I think it is not the british's fault if their food is bland ond boring... nothing can grow locally apart from potatoes and leeks or in greenhouses from a very few selected hybrid species that can keep in gigantic cold storage for months!!!.... So, every single vegetable, fruit has to travel half way through Europe to get to your table.
Just look at the country of origin of them at the supermarket or your corner shop!!!!!! How can it be tasty???? or of any nutritional value????? Blame the weather, not the cooks. (I still have in my mouth the taste of wild "fraises des bois" the chef's wife (in her beautiful light, near transparent dress delightfully showing her curves!!!) was serving us half an hour after picking them down the lane behind this little french restaurant at 12€ the menu and could hardly get off the table my stomach was so full and my eyes just as much......) Not talking about international chefs here, just good honest products, sourced locally and very fresh. After 24hrs of being harvested, most plants have oxyded too much to retain any goodness vitamins etc...) A very important point is (and the difference is enormous when comparing French and British!) the ambiance of the place. I do not find in the uk the connection, border intimate and cerebral between the client and the host that you feel in a South of France or Meditterranean restaurant....

Wingswinger
18th May 2014, 12:40
Windy,

a piece of meat the size of a shilling and a couple of carrots the size of match sticks surrounded by a bunch of squiggles! Needless to say they were not impressed and stopped on the way home to buy fish and chips!

I agree. Can't stand "nouvelle cuisine". I blame Masterchef and all the rest of the food-porn on TV. Why do they feel they have to do something "clever" to it and blend flavours? Over-priced sh1te. Why didn't they send it back to the kitchen?

Good food comes from good ingredients well cooked and left to "speak for themselves" without spices and additional flavourings. There's PLENTY of good food in the UK if you look in the right places.

And while I'm at it: Where did this idea of putting chorizo in fish dishes come from? I don't want greasy Spanish sausage. I want freshly caught, cleanly cooked fish! And another thing, when ordering sea bass or a sea bream I want the whole fish, not a fillet. Charging £16-24 for a fillet which is half of the fish is a rip-off! :* Doubly so when one knows its a farmed fish which cost 50p to produce!

I don't think the quality of food can't be talked about without taking social class into consideration. Chav-fodder is appalling whatever country you are in. It's perfectly possible to eat VERY badly in France. As for Chinese, Indian, Thai, Nepalese, Indonesian or any other ethnic cuisine, I've not touched it for years on the basis that you don't really know what meat you are eating its so doused in spices, other flavourings and MSG.

Limeygal
18th May 2014, 12:45
Have to agree about British cooking. To be fair, pub food has improved over the years, although I still enjoy a good ploughman's. IMHO, the further north you go in Europe, the worse the food gets. Perhaps the cold freezes the taste buds and we who live there don't notice the blandness. Maybe that's why we Brits enjoy Indian food so much-wakes up the old taste buds :)

TomJoad
18th May 2014, 13:01
It's not so much what you eat, but how many times you eat/day that confuses me.


From reading this forum (and other sources) you also have "supper." (I am assuming after "tea" or "high tea.") So, do you eat 4X/day: Breakfast. Lunch. Tea/High Tea. Supper??

Can someone please explain the typical UK meal schedule to me?

Ta!

V2 - its rather easy, that schedule ( Breakfast. Lunch. Tea/High Tea. Supper) is the preserve of Downtown Abbey, Buckingham Palace and any other period drama flogged to the rest of the world by the BBC to reflect the quaintness of times gone by in Blighty - there is a market for it and it sells. Sorry to disallusion you but the average Brit's eating schedule is likely no more different than any other - Breakfast, lunch, evening meal. And sadly, for a great many, most of this is provided by ready meals from the local supermarket and consumed in front on the TV. I believe even the Queen has been known to do such - probably didn't do the supermarket thing herself though:p

Tom

Fliegenmong
18th May 2014, 13:16
Knowing a few QF crew reunions, that this place has been visited....

RQ's at Robina | McGuires Hotels (http://www.mcguireshotels.com.au/rqsrobina)

Mrs Fliegs and I will sometimes go for lunch....$7.90 for lunch after the purchase of a drink

So a pint of XXXX Gold and a roast meal for lunch becomes very good value!!! :ok:

Remember the old days when $5 would get you a 'Countery' ...(Counter Lunch), with a beer thrown in!!! :ok:

evansb
18th May 2014, 14:22
So "Tea" is a supper of microwaved Chicken Tika Masala and a can of ale. Got it:ok: Rule Britannia!

onetrack
18th May 2014, 14:45
Fliegs - We just spent 10 days with son/stepson and his wife at Burleigh Waters and tried quite a number of pubs and eateries around the Gold Coast.
Varsity Lakes Tavern is only a short walk from his house and does very good feeds for quite reasonable prices.

You can buy a "member card" for $15 and the card then entitles you to buy a second meal for only $5, from Monday to Thursday.
They run $10 lunches every day of the week, and all the meals we had there were good.

There's also a really excellent Indian restaurant down at the shops on the corner of Christine Ave., and Bermuda St. ("Christine Corner").
We also tried a number of the clubs and pubs from Surfers down to Coolangatta and always got a good, reasonably-priced feed. ,
We didn't eat in Robina, we had enough trouble trying to find our way around the rabbit-warren streets!

It appears, as Worrals says, the clubs and pubs on your side of the country do very reasonably-priced feeds, because the pokies carry them as well.
As W.A. has never had, and never will have pokies, the pubs and restaurants in the West are reliant only on food and drinks for income.
I'm happy enough to pay a little more for food, not to have pokies. IMHO, they're the biggest social curse ever introduced.

In Perth city, there are plenty of ripoffs on food - but it only takes a bit of looking around to find a decent feed at a reasonable price.
Next time you're in town, take a taxi, CAT bus, or a bit of a walk, over to 150 Bennett St in East Perth, and find Baileys Hotel/Motel.
The Italian restaurant attached to Baileys is called the Bella Vista and it does excellent, consistent meals, for very reasonable prices.

meadowrun
18th May 2014, 14:45
Most everyone working is not home for "teatime", unless on weekends or other days off. It's three squares or if like me, two and a bit. Lots of tea though.

tony draper
18th May 2014, 16:43
If you dont like the grub,bring a large bag of sandwiches with you.:rolleyes:

V2-OMG!
18th May 2014, 18:19
V2 - its rather easy, that schedule ( Breakfast. Lunch. Tea/High Tea. Supper) is the preserve of Downtown Abbey, Buckingham Palace and any other period drama flogged to the rest of the world by the BBC to reflect the quaintness of times gone by in Blighty - there is a market for it and it sells. Sorry to disallusion you but the average Brit's eating schedule is likely no more different than any other - Breakfast, lunch, evening meal. And sadly, for a great many, most of this is provided by ready meals from the local supermarket and consumed in front on the TV. I believe even the Queen has been known to do such - probably didn't do the supermarket thing herself though.

Tom, thanks so much for the explanation - although, it did shatter those British high-tea fantasies somewhat. I am in the process of setting-up a small food-related business in a very quaint tourist-oriented area across the pond. The bistros and bakery cafes now offer "tea." There is a market for it and they are popular - especially this past Mother's Day. $35/person and up.

Windy Militant
18th May 2014, 18:30
In that case you need to offer cream teas which seem to be growth industry in nostalgia hereabouts, especially with steam railways!
http://www.gwili-railway.co.uk/en/dining/afternoon-cream-tea.aspx

evansb
18th May 2014, 19:30
"Chopsticks are one of the reasons why the Chinese never invented custard". Spike Milligan (1918-2002)





By the way, what are "pokies"?

Capetonian
18th May 2014, 19:34
"Chopsticks are one of the reasons there are millions of starving people in the Far East".A more recent quote.

sea oxen
18th May 2014, 19:59
By the way, what are "pokies"?

Australian for slot, gaming, or 'poker machines'. They raise considerable revenue for the venues hosting them - in particular clubs, whose prices reflect the additional income stream. For some reason Western Australia doesn't have them.

500N
18th May 2014, 20:03
Evans

I think "slot machines" and one armed bandits is how I knew them in the UK.


"For some reason Western Australia doesn't have them."

Because WA is a wowser state :O

uffington sb
18th May 2014, 20:04
English food throughout the day starts of with breakfast, then elevenses (tea/coffee and biscuits), then at midday it's lunch but lunch is called dinner in working class households or by Other Ranks in the forces. Next comes High Tea at about 4 o'clock, but this is for posh people and shouldn't be confused with Tea, which is at 5 to 6 o'clock for the working classes. Next comes Dinner for posh people at 7 o'clock.
Supper is a late evening meal, often a curry on the way home from the pub.

Posh.
Early morning. Breakfast.
Mid morning. Elevenses.
Midday. Lunch.
Afternoon. High Tea (sandwiches etc)
5 ish. N/A.
7 ish Dinner ( main meal)
Late. Supper (home from the theatre)

Working class
Early morning Breakfast
Mid morning elevenses
Midday. Dinner
Afternoon. N/A
5 ish. Tea (main meal)
7 ish. N/A
Late. Supper (home from the pub)

Tankertrashnav
18th May 2014, 20:23
What is "Tea" then?...a meal of some sort I do believe, normally eaten between 4pm and 6pm. Why name a meal after a beverage I'll never understand.


evans b

Put on full protective clothing because you are now entering a mine-field, with many class-ridden booby traps.

It goes like this:

"Tea" (or afternoon tea) - said beverage, accompanied by a combination of cakes, pastries, scones (does not rhyme with stones) etc. The point is, this is NOT a cooked meal. Usually taken around 4- 5 pm. Many from the other side of the pond assume that the elaborate afternoon teas sold at eye-watering prices in London hotels are called High Tea (qv) - not so.

"High Tea" - can consist of many different items, maybe a mixed grill or similar but the point is, this is a light cooked meal of usually no more than two courses and not as elaborate as dinner. Eaten early in the evening.

HOWEVER - Many people from what might be loosely referred to as the "working classes" (self included) refer to their evening meal as "tea", and this can be taken any time from around 6 - 8 pm.

NB. The "middle classes" (or those who aspire to that sector) tend to call their evening meal "supper" (often pronounced "suppah"). The plebs (self included) will only use this term for a late night snack after coming home from the pub.

"Dinner", a term for the main evening meal is tending to fall from use, to be replaced by "supper" (I have noticed the term "supper party" is replacing "dinner party" (I rarely give or attend either).

Finally just to confuse matters further, the old usage of "dinner" to mean the main meal of the day, even if eaten in the middle of the day, has not been entirely supplanted by "lunch" - whoever heard of school lunch ladies, for example?

Alles klar? ;)

uffington - Just noticed your version. I repeat, "posh" afternoon tea is NOT high tea! Otherwise I pretty much concur.

con-pilot
18th May 2014, 20:29
whoever heard of school lunch ladies, for example?


I've never heard of 'school dinner ladies', not even when I lived in England, only 'school lunch ladies'. So that is a new one to me.

The main evening meal I have always called/considered dinner and I always will.

Old fart you know. ;)

Oh, served around 19:00/20:00 (7pm/8pm).

Tankertrashnav
18th May 2014, 20:30
Just a short one on English food itself. It's the rhubarb season now - stewed rhubarb and custard is sublime, and quintissentially English. The poor benighted French with their inferior cuisine have probably never even heard of it - I'm not even sure there is a French word for rhubarb!

500N
18th May 2014, 20:32
" Put on full protective clothing because you are now entering a mine-field, with many class-ridden booby traps."

Isn't it ever !


"It's the rhubarb season now - stewed rhubarb and custard is sublime, and quintissentially English."

Agree, very English !


What about out "Toad in the hole" ?

con-pilot
18th May 2014, 20:33
I'm not even sure there is a French word for rhubarb

Merde? :p

alicopter
18th May 2014, 20:41
Rhubarb was only introduced from Russia in the UK in the 18th Century but was known and cultivated on the continent since Marco Polo and his Chinese trips...... The French word for it is... of course... THE original Rhubarbe...

Capetonian
18th May 2014, 20:43
Tankertrashnav Thank you for an excellent de-obfuscation of the class and regional variations on the naming conventions of meals in the UK. It is a bloody minefield, even for someone like myself who was born in the UK and spends a lot of time there. I fell into the 'tea' trap once when visiting the parents of a friend in Lancashire late afternoon (about 17h00), and was asked if I'd like 'some tea'. I expected a 'cuppa' or a 'nice brew' as they call it, so replied affirmatively and the good lady went into the kitchen and I heard the sounds of a meal being prepared, and then out came trays of fried food, doorstep thick slices of bread, then sickly coloured deserts and cake appeared.

Food in the UK has improved beyond recognition since Oi were a lad, when it used to consist of salty brown soup, grey meat, and overboiled vegetables with the consistency and feel of what Rudyard Kipling described as the 'grey-green greasy Limpopo River'.

We eat 'dinner' in the evenings, and even my partner and son know that and they are 'foreigners'.

I note with pleasure that French cuisine has been well and truly knocked off its perch and the myth of its superiority debunked.

500N
18th May 2014, 20:48
I just remembered the word used to describe English food.

Stodgy ?

(I hope the spelling is correct !)

evansb
18th May 2014, 21:11
Re-naming some of the traditional dishes could help. Who salivates at the thought of Cock a Leekie? Spotted Dick? Blood Pudding? Hagis? Pasty?, (even though it is a lovely baked pastry, don't you dare say "I'll have a Cornish Pastry please"). Note that "pasty" may not be pronounced how you think it should..and how is the plural of "pasty" pronounced? A Canadian lad must be careful..

I do love a traditional British Sunday Roast, (roast beef, Yorkshire pudding, gravy, mashed potatoes, and some regional vegetables), alas the roast beef is usually overcooked and subsequently too dry. Beef cooked rare to medium-rare with a tad of horse radish is a simple delight. No HP dark sauce required. A dash of Lea & Perrins? Sure, why not? The mash should be creamy smooth, no chunky bits. The Yorkshire light and fluffy. The gravy should have a deep beefy flavour, not too fatty or floury. The veggies should have a bit of a crunch, not the traditional soggy and limp. "Soggy and Limp" sounds like another British dish...and no I AM NOT A FAN OF GORDON RAMSAY...although he has does a lot of good for British cuisine. Nuff said.

500N
18th May 2014, 21:36
Tuck shop lady :p

Tuck shop, a very British school thing !

B Fraser
18th May 2014, 21:41
A Scottish feast such as Cullen Skink followed by scallops, sage and bacon then cranachan (which is very similar to Eton Mess but with oatmeal and honey), topped off with Cornish Yarg, English Stilton or Highland cheddar is a damned fine meal.


I used to live within walking distance of an amazing butcher who made the most wonderful game pies. They cured their own bacon and made many varieties of pork, lamb and beef sausages which would give the French a run for their money. I love French food and admire the French (but not their engineering, flying skills etc.) however the culinary gulf is not as wide as they would have us believe.

reynoldsno1
19th May 2014, 00:24
Most Chinese food outside China seems to be essentially Cantonese - which is probably the most bland & boring of all their regional cuisines. I like the Thai style of eating - if you're hungry, you eat, whatever you like. No set times, no matching times with types of food ...

500N
19th May 2014, 00:31
We have a great Thai chain of restaurant here in Aus.

I hadn't eaten Thai much and the GF insisted we go.

I loved it.


Re Chinese food, I have been told that Chinese take away is not much
like true Chinese food. Never been to China so don't know.

Limeygal
19th May 2014, 00:48
500N-Food in China is very different from the westernized versions-I liked it. Even in Hong Kong where the western influence is strong the food tastes different.

BenThere
19th May 2014, 01:35
I stayed at the Darwin Atrium Hotel in November, 1995 for 17 days. That's where I met my wife. My second best experience was enjoying the walk down to the wharf and enjoying the fabulous fish there. I'd never had barramundi before. Don't think I've enjoyed fresh fish more.

Also had marvelous whiting (several times) in Adelaide years later. Based on my limited horizons and exposure, one of the best things about Australia is the fish, among many contending excellent attributes of Oz.

Also was dazzled by my visits to the local butcher shop in Innisfail, where I could order 1 and 1/2 inch thick T-bone steaks from farm fresh beef. Heavenly. We don't get much lamb in the US, but I've acquired a taste for it thanks to my wife. The butcher also had lamb roasts to die for, and after the meal, ground into shepherds pie - another delight, or folded into pasties - equally exquisite..

500N
19th May 2014, 01:41
BenThere

Re Lamb, over the years, Lamb here seems to have lost a bit of it's taste so I try to get two tooth or
mutton which is older sheep - not so old that they are grandpa's but past 2 - 3 year old.

The flavour is stronger, some people don't like it but I find it great.


We have a plant here called Salt Bush, lives in very dry areas. If sheep have been
feeding on that it taste awesome.

ruddman
19th May 2014, 02:36
I stayed at the Darwin Atrium Hotel in November, 1995 for 17 days. That's where I met my wife. My second best experience was enjoying the walk down to the wharf and enjoying the fabulous fish there. I'd never had barramundi before. Don't think I've enjoyed fresh fish.


Sill trying to figure BenThere's statement out. 2nd best? What was first? Did you have Chinese the night before? Indian? Lamb?

:confused:

500N
19th May 2014, 02:40
"Innisfail"

Cattle from the Atherton Tablelands and channel country inland.

They do product good meat !

BenThere
19th May 2014, 02:40
A true romantic you are, ruddman.

ruddman
19th May 2014, 02:45
Thank you BenThere. My wife also agrees. :8

Nothing like a butter chicken with saffron rice and naan bread to set the mood with what follows.


Hopefully some cheesecake. :p

onetrack
19th May 2014, 03:11
Despite the putdown on most things French on here - you'd have to admit, the French excell at pastries and breads. Must be a hangover from Queen Marie-Antoinettes days. :)

I have fond memories of consuming some of the lightest, tastiest croissants, baguettes, and other delicious pastries, that I have ever tasted, when staying in Paris.

500N
19th May 2014, 03:15
One Track

I agree, french bread et al when I was there was superb.


I will say that Coles now has an excellent range of fresh baked breads that is very good and I think Brumby's also has a few that taste great.

Solid Rust Twotter
19th May 2014, 09:14
The Karoo lamb in these parts live on the wild sage that grows in the arid regions. The flavour permeates the meat, making it one of the best tasting roasts you can get. Sadly, the price is outrageous due to stock losses running close to 80% because of widespread stock theft and useless police who fail to do their jobs.

Many farmers have quit farming with sheep for that reason. It's so bad that the local nickname for lamb is take aways because of the ease of carrying them off in a pick up truck or a matatu pulled up to the fence of the farm along the road.

Tankertrashnav
19th May 2014, 10:09
evans b - traditional English Roast with mashed potatoes? Bizarre idea - roast potatoes surely. George Orwell wrote an essay entitled In Defence of English Cooking in 1943 in which he maintains that roasting them under the joint is the best way of cooking potatoes. Mind you, he always looked as though he could do with a damn good meal, so maybe he's not the best authority!

Re French bread - never been a huge fan - they have nothing to touch an English crusty farmhouse loaf. Four months of living in Paris had me pining for one! Their baguettes are lovely at breakfast but are suitable only for beating the kids on the head by lunchtime! And as for croissants - nothing but a mouthful of crumbs!

Lonewolf_50
19th May 2014, 13:38
The best bread I have ever eaten was the kind made fresh, first thing in the morning, in Naples, Italy. It has a lot of flavor, sort of like a sourdough but not quite the same. Crust nice and strong. The bugger about Italy is that in the south, it is sometimes a reach to get butter. Up north not such a problem, but the bread in the north isn't as good. (In Florence, it tastes like clay, even though the meals themselves are quite good).

To really enjoy bread a la Naples, have it with a bit of Provolone, sharp, from the locale where they make it a few hours north of that usually dirty but quite interesting city. And a glass of local wine.

tony draper
19th May 2014, 15:25
Bah! keep yer girly furrin food gimmee a proper mans dinner any day.:rolleyes:
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/second%20album/bm_zpsb5dfc53b.jpg (http://s11.photobucket.com/user/Deaddogbay/media/second%20album/bm_zpsb5dfc53b.jpg.html)

meadowrun
19th May 2014, 16:18
Aye, seconded...


http://s3-media4.ak.yelpcdn.com/bphoto/D-oy84xozEnEfxh8a6PB_g/l.jpg

Lonewolf_50
19th May 2014, 16:30
Ploughman's lunch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman's_lunch)

I had no idea there was a formal name to one of my favorite lunch combinations. Bread, cheese, pickles, beer, and now and again meat is a good lunch at home for when I am working in the garage for most of the day.

Huh, coincidence.

BenThere
19th May 2014, 23:40
The best bread I have ever eaten was the kind made fresh, first thing in the morning, in Naples, Italy.

I, too, loved the fresh bread in Naples. The year I spent working at Capodichino and living in Lago Patria, as I'm sure many others here did, was one of marvelous flavors and new cuisine experiences.

I couldn't get enough, also, of the inimitable mozzarella, less than one day old, dipped from the barrel at the local market. That and broiled fresh lobster are my lifetime favorite palate pleasures.

TomJoad
19th May 2014, 23:48
Yes, agreed. I have fond memories of home made Italian bread made on the wood stove. Heaven on Earth.

cattletruck
20th May 2014, 13:19
With Britain being so well connected by low cost carriers servicing main Europe, eating out has taken on a whole new meaning.

Then there is mall (food court) food which is universal the world over.

nomorecatering
20th May 2014, 13:47
british ans cuisine are oxymorons. Traditional food involes boiling it until every vestage of goodness is gone and the pulp that is left is eaten. A Sunday roast is ok, but the vegies are tradionally boiled to within an inch of their lives. Most pubs offer a limited menu, the plowmans lunch being universally inedible and tasteless. You cant find a decent hamburger, some places do good fish and chios but you cant eat it everyday. Thankfully the Asians in the UK offer far superior food.

MagnusP
20th May 2014, 14:17
british ans cuisine are oxymorons
As are, apparently, nomorecatering (anyone see the irony?), capitalisation and spelling. :p

There is some superb food out there. Scottish game and fish are among the best in the world. Tayside soft fruit is delicious.

jez d
20th May 2014, 14:46
Hear, hear, Magnus

It's fair to say, however, that our 1970s restaurants weren't the most inventive.

Back in the day, a typical menu from our neck of the woods (southwest England) would consist of:

Starters

Whitebait with white bread
Melon half
Melon half with Parma ham (a la carte only)
Grapefruit half
Pink grapefruit half (a la carte only)
Glass fruit juice (from concentrate)
Prawn cocktail (rubber shrimps in mayo/ketchup sauce, lovingly thrown on a heap of wilted lettuce).

Mains

Steak & Kidney pudding (mash or boiled potatoes, peas & gravy)
Gammon eggs & chips (baked beans, mushy peas or gravy)
Fish & chips (baked beans or mushy peas)
Lamb chop (mash or boiled potatoes, peas & gravy)
Pork chop (mash or boiled potatoes, peas & gravy)
Beef stew (contents variable)
Lamb hot pot (contents variable)
Spaghetti Bolognese (rice or chips 10p extra)
Coronation Chicken (rice & salad Ė carrots, cabbage & wilted lettuce)
Liver & onion (mash or boiled potatoes, peas & gravy)
Rump steak Ė please specify well done, burnt or cremated (mash or boiled potatoes, peas & gravy)

Deserts

Instant whip (brown)
Fruit salad, fresh from tin
Tip Top choc bar (sans chocolate)
Cup of tea

MagnusP
20th May 2014, 14:58
jez d, oh, how I remember those days. You forgot chicken in a basket, or scampi in a basket. :yuk:

The UK is awash with good restaurants (and good pub food); I suspect there were always a few fine dining places around, albeit with less choice than now if you wanted locally sourced food made to traditional-style recipes. We had a great lunch at Tom Kitchin's "gastropub" in Edinburgh. Sheep's heid scotch broth (possibly the best soup I've tasted) and roast pheasant. Wonderful.

The SSK
20th May 2014, 15:07
Bah! keep yer girly furrin food gimmee a proper mans dinner any day.

Well here in Brussels you will see sausage and mash on most pub menus.

Capetonian
20th May 2014, 15:16
There are few countries that offer a wider selection of good (and bad) food than the UK. Apart from many excellent pub restaurants, there is a huge choice of ethnic, mostly Asian, take-aways and sit-downs.

The only countries that beat the UK in this regard are South Africa, Australia and the Netherlands. Germany and Austria also offer excellent food but apart from the ethnics which are common in Germany, there is little variety.

France is a culinary disaster, despite the perception. Most restaurants serve the same unvarying menu of over-priced and over-elaborate unvarying dross, tarted up with fancy names and sauces, and offer poor service at high prices.

If I were restricted to only ever being able to eat in restaurants in one country, I would probably choose the UK. That may sound very insular and narrow minded, and coming from someone who had never left the UK apart from a weekend in Paris and a week in Benidorm, it would be, but that is far from being my situation.

BenThere
20th May 2014, 15:29
You have a lot more choices in the US - McDonald's, Wendy's, Burger King, Arby's, Subway, KFC, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut - the list goes on and on.

Tankertrashnav
20th May 2014, 15:45
Ben There - with the possible exception of Arby's, all on that list are available in the UK - if you are desperate ;)

nomorecatering - I will give your illiterate post a response it does not really deserve.

Your comments may have been valid around 40 years ago, but taking vegetables (I assume that's what you mean by "vegies") it is now almost impossible to obtain vegetables in restaurants which have been sufficiently cooked. The pendulum has swung from overcooked and mushy, to practically raw, with chefs seemingly unaware that there is a happy medium.

I have just been listening to the Food Programme on Radio 4 where one of the presenters listed food items for which Britain excels, including proper pies with a raised crust, heavy fruit cake and sponges and steamed puddings, of which Christmas Pudding is a good example. None of these are present in the much vaunted French cuisine (I do not except the ubiquitous tarte tatin as an acceptable alternative to an apple pie) and a gateau is simply NOT a cake, no matter what the dictionary may tell us.

The SSK
20th May 2014, 15:54
Limoges potato pie?

BenThere
20th May 2014, 15:57
with the possible exception of Arby's, all on that list are available in the UK - if you are desperate


That's the power of the American culture.

jez d
20th May 2014, 16:06
You forgot chicken in a basket, or scampi in a basket.

Oh god, yes, and chicken a la creme, and, of course - how could I have forgotten - duck a l'orange made with orange squash (no kidding) !

Naturally the wine list was the perfect accompaniment to the fine dining experience:

Blacktower
Blue Nun
Piat d'or
Frascati
Babycham
Lambrusco (red or white)
Bulgarian Red (anti-freeze included)

Tankertrashnav
20th May 2014, 16:25
Limoges potato pie?

Yes, but even then that's made with puff pastry, and I dont really count that as a proper pie!

All these hilarious comments about British restaurant menus in the 70's are about as relevant as saying you cant take a dump in France without squatting over a hole in the ground. Both countries have moved on since then!

The SSK
20th May 2014, 16:38
In the bit of France I'm moving to, the most ubiquitous dish is Welsh Rarebit (menus say Nos Welshs). Last place I was in boasted 'made with Wyke Farms Cheddar'

BenThere
20th May 2014, 16:43
I know it's not haute cuisine but I think my favorite place to eat is Mexico City, at the better restaurants there. The flavors and seasonings are robust and piquant, which suits my personal taste. The prices almost make me feel guilty.

I travel there every month, and bid the trips primarily for the food, and also to get my boots energetically shined to a gloss for $2.

Capetonian
20th May 2014, 16:52
I have enjoyed proper Mexican food in Mexico and in Texas and California, and it's excellent. Shame on the shit that passes as 'TexMex' in Europe and the UK ....... substandard ingredients cooked and then sprinkled with chili powder and passed off as 'Mexican'. I had one of the most memorable (for the wrong reasons) meals within my recent memory in a pseudo TexMex in Salford Quays last week. I should have known better, in fact I did know better, but it was the only place open at the late hour when I wanted to eat, apart from a pub which I had been warned about!

jez d
20th May 2014, 17:01
All these hilarious comments about British restaurant menus in the 70's are about as relevant as saying you cant take a dump in France without squatting over a hole in the ground. Both countries have moved on since then!

Quite, but the gentlemanly art of self-deprecation hasn't - at least I certainly hope it hasn't - and as long as we know that we're God's gift to the kitchen then whatever the rest of the world thinks is but orange squash off the back of the aforementioned duck :ok:

Tankertrashnav
20th May 2014, 17:27
Yes, I guess I'd go along with that :ok:

500N
20th May 2014, 17:36
Cape

I have heard that said about Mexican the world over.

tony draper
20th May 2014, 17:44
I read a snippet about Duck a l'Orange once, Napoleon was staying overnight somewhere his chaps had recently laid waste too,local Chef was dragged before himself and commanded to cook him a good dinner,the chef seething with hatred for the Little Corporal,flung together some disparate ingredients that he hoped would result in a revolting dish to put before the Emperor that he could claim was the local speciality thus saving his neck,however Napoleon loved it and we have had Duck a l'Orange ever since.
How true this is I know not,
:rolleyes:

cumulusrider
20th May 2014, 18:16
Fond memories of a childhood living near Peterhead on the east coast of scotland. Fish straight off the boat, potatoes from the fields round the village all cooked on a coal fired chip shop.
Standard portion of chips was sixpence (2 1/2p)
Also self caught trout and sea trout, duck and hares I shot myself.

School dinners included Cullun skink, Tatties and neeps. sponge pudding with pink something on it, spotted dick, etc. and of course the 1/3 pint of school milk

500N
20th May 2014, 18:20
Tony

Let's hope the same theory of how a dish came about doesn't apply to "Spotted dick" ! :O


"the 1/3 pint of school milk"
Remember all the above well but especially the the 1/3 pint of school mil.

TomJoad
20th May 2014, 18:48
british ans cuisine are oxymorons. Traditional food involes boiling it until every vestage of goodness is gone and the pulp that is left is eaten. A Sunday roast is ok, but the vegies are tradionally boiled to within an inch of their lives.


And we send our children up chimneys. Been a while since you were in Blighty then:ugh:

cockney steve
20th May 2014, 21:36
Several local pubs do fantastic meals....generous portions, beautifully cooked, fresh locally sourced meat and veg wherever possible.
a beer,three courses and a tea or coffee, change from a tenner

There is a lot of farmland around Southport and Blackpool (the Fylde Coast) which grows a wide variety of produce.

Scotland... Morning rolls!!!! fluffy ,delicious bread. warm from the bakers, tear open, butter generously and enjoy.....the hot mutton pies, also served at many bakers' unbeatable delicious and nourishing.
Aberdeen, used to stay in the Douglas on Market St. Breakfast accompanied by morning-rolls or a flaky pastry reminiscent of a Croissant...but far superior :p They were a local speciality, never did get the name.
Benbecula, overnight stay, late sixties. "high Tea" about 4 of us residents, enough sandwiches, cakes , scones,etc. to feed about 30.
A truly sumptuous feast and worth every penny my employer paid for it.

Fish and Chips...same trip,whiting and chips,change from half a crown
(Stornoway)

For UK fish and chips , there's an "app" for i-phone thingies..."I fish for chips" which directs you to the the best local friers.....also, visit the National Federation of Fish Friers website.....Fish and chips is a professionally produced, quality meal,nowadays.
Factoid ! properly cooked Fish and Chips has the LOWEST FAT CONTENT of any takeaway meal.

There's a huge debate within the Trade, Wet fish V Frozen at Sea.

Wet (NOT "fresh") can be several days old. Frozen at Sea is filleted and frozen, the freshness locked-in, within 12 hours of the fish hitting the deck. Some will say that it needs a couple of days for fish to developit's flavour.... At home, I buy frozen Canadian Pollock....delicious,moist, flaky fish,close to Cod in texture, between Cod and Haddock for flavour.

Another fallacy debunked! "fried fish"-ISN'T! the batter is fried and forms a jacket within which the fish is steamed in it's own juices.

feeling hungry now!

I have NEVER eaten Mc. D's, KFC, or any of the major-chain junk food.

Tankertrashnav
20th May 2014, 21:56
Scotland... Morning rolls!!!! fluffy ,delicious bread. warm from the bakers, tear open, butter generously and enjoy.....


Fantastic - havent had any in years - I'd swap a dozen croissants for one Scottish roll!

Lonewolf_50
20th May 2014, 22:24
I have enjoyed proper Mexican food in Mexico and in Texas and California, and it's excellent. Shame on the shit that passes as 'TexMex' in Europe and the UK ....... substandard ingredients cooked and then sprinkled with chili powder and passed off as 'Mexican'.
For my money, the best "Mexican" food is served in New Mexico, in some local eateries in Santa Fe.
Tastes vary, of course.

The best chile relleno I ever had was on a mom and pop place on the California/Mexico border. None has come close since.

There is a lot of latitude in the breading and the stuffing, a few recipes here:

Chiles Rellenos Recipe - CHOW (http://www.chow.com/recipes/29565-chiles-rellenos)
Two Tips to Delicious and Fluffy Chile Rellenos (http://www.fullcircle.com/goodfoodlife/2011/10/12/two-tips-to-delicious-and-fluffy-chile-rellenos/)
Chile relleno - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chile_relleno)

I never had a bad meal when I was in the UK.

A full English Breakfast? Great food.
Many was the lunch we had with some sort of pie and a pint.
Dinner varied, which of course included a few kebabs and curries ... hey, whatever's available, right? :ok:

con-pilot
20th May 2014, 22:30
Can't say I've ever been in any country that the food is consistently bad.

Oh wait, I take that back, Iceland.

Sorry, but nothing I ate there was very good. Think one needs be born there.

Rossian
20th May 2014, 22:31
........in Aberdeen it's called a "buttery rowie". There used to be a bakery on George St where they were ready at 3AM as one wibbled one's way home from an evening out. Three or four in a bag, still warm - great! Only down side was the hideous indigestion resulting from wolfing them down too quickly. Sigh....

The Ancient Mariner

500N
20th May 2014, 22:31
Someone mentioned the UK and boiled vegetables.

I do tend to agree, when I was there veggies tended to be boiled to the n'th degree.

Although I expect things have moved on since then !

Capetonian
20th May 2014, 23:36
Can't say I've ever been in any country that the food is consistently bad.
Oh wait, I take that back, Iceland.Odd that you found that as we spent a couple of weeks in Iceland and found the food excellent, in particular the seafood, and my partner and son said the lamb (which I don't eat) was the best they'd ever had, better even than our Karoo lamb.

con-pilot
21st May 2014, 00:26
Odd that you found that as we spent a couple of weeks in Iceland and found the food excellent, in particular the seafood, and my partner and son said the lamb (which I don't eat) was the best they'd ever had, better even than our Karoo lamb.

I might have be a bit too harsh or judgmental. But I am one that tries the local, traditional fare and in the twos days I was there, that was what I ate.

To my sorrow.

Iím sure if Iíd tried what would be normal food to me, cooked international style, it would have been different.

And Iíve eaten some weird foods in my travels around the world and in every country Iíve found local food that I would go back for, but not in Iceland.

Sorry, no intent to offend anyone.


PS, Didn't try the local lamb, I can get lamb anywhere, well almost anywhere. :p

BenThere
21st May 2014, 02:05
I've had at least 100 days at Keflavik, and I always found the food available, especially the salmon, top notch.

I distinctly recall trekking to the harbor restaurant just off base. We Americans show up at 6 PM for dinner, while the Icelanders don't come out until 8 or 9. We showed up at 6 as the doors opened.

The special is '3 fresh fish on a wood slab'.

"What are the fish", I asked the waitress, who was one of the most beautiful women in the world.

"I don't know yet. The boat just now docked outside. Look."

There it was, offloading the fish I would later eat that night.

Can it get any better than that?

10Watt
21st May 2014, 02:29
Lean belly pork roasted. Err ..... that`s it.

MagnusP
21st May 2014, 08:04
10W, slightly fattier pork belly (skin off, bone in) marinated overnight in Coca-Cola with garlic, sage, shallot and carrot, then slow-roasted for about 4 hours. Meanwhile, strain and reduce the marinade to make a sticky glaze for the last 20 minutes of roasting.

Aberdeen rowies for breakfast - agreed, they're delicious. As indicated above, however, you then have Zantac for elevenses. :p

Metro man
21st May 2014, 09:14
Bernie Inn's most popular dinner combination:

Prawn Cocktail
Rump Steak
Black Forest Gateaux

The list of 1970s menu items bought back a few memories, in those days Chinese food was very exotic. ;)

Tankertrashnav
21st May 2014, 09:16
Never been to Iceland but I once watched an Icelandic film where the central character called in at a drive-in on the way home where he picked half a sheep's head (handed in through the window like a MacD - really!). Once home he sat at the kitchen table where he shovelled all the "edible" bits, including the brains, out of the skull :eek:

As con-pilot said - I think one needs to have been born there!

Capetonian
21st May 2014, 10:56
Bernie Inn's most popular dinner combination:
Prawn Cocktail
Rump Steak
Black Forest GateauxFunny you should mention this. I remember one of my very first 'dates' when I was about 18 and invited a girl I worked with out for dinner. We went to a Bernie Inn ('posh' in them days!) and I am pretty sure that's exactly what we had. I remember that she asked for 'red sauce' on her steak, which turned out to mean 'tomato sauce', and when I told my mother, who was very old-fashioned and an utter snob, she said : "I really don't think that's the sort of girl you should be 'courting'." My mother was right, I'd rather have been 'courting' the sort of girl who'd drop her broekies after a takeaway and a pint of shandy!

Ancient Mariner
21st May 2014, 12:33
Tankertrashnav, you mean like this:
Bon appetit!
Per


Before
http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o702/perebs/Smalahovefoslashr_zps23c9ee07.jpg (http://s1339.photobucket.com/user/perebs/media/Smalahovefoslashr_zps23c9ee07.jpg.html)

After
http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o702/perebs/Smalahoveetter_zpsfa4f42da.jpg (http://s1339.photobucket.com/user/perebs/media/Smalahoveetter_zpsfa4f42da.jpg.html)

cockney steve
21st May 2014, 12:56
BEFORE....AFTER except, it's 2 different halves.....2 different plates........
hat, coat, cleaver.....:8
Thanks for "Rowies" I'll try to remember that.

felixflyer
21st May 2014, 13:03
Fish and chips have to be cooked in beef dripping, every southern chip shop I have been to use oil which is just wrong. It usually results in a flat batter that oozes oil and dry fish inside. Give me proper northern fish and chips any day, light fluffy batter with flaky haddock inside.

Much of what is now considered 'posh nosh' was once upon a time peasant food, what we call chav food now. I wonder if in the future masterchef contestants will be knocking up donner kebabs and beans on toast.

Who was it that said mashed potato's with a roast dinner? that is just wrong.

I am hungry after reading this thread.

tony draper
21st May 2014, 13:47
Mashed tatties wi a Roast is fine if you dislike roast tatties which I do:rolleyes:

Tankertrashnav
21st May 2014, 16:45
Fish and chips have to be cooked in beef dripping, every southern chip shop I have been to use oil which is just wrong. It usually results in a flat batter that oozes oil and dry fish inside. Give me proper northern fish and chips any day, light fluffy batter with flaky haddock inside

Rick Stein's in Falmouth must be one of the most Southerly chippies in the country and they use beef dripping only - and the haddock and chips are great. (Oh, and they dont pour gravy over them like 'oop North :yuk:)

Ancient Mariner - you are a braver man than I am!

con-pilot
21st May 2014, 17:02
We lived in Felixstowe for about two years, before it became a container port, back when it was more like a fishing village.

At the end of the street we lived on there was a fish monger's shop that sold fish and chips, but only on Wednesday through Friday. We never really knew what type of fish would be served, as he only fried the fish he bought fresh that day. Oh, and it was take away only, no place to eat in his shop.

I have never eaten fish and chips as good as those since.

One more thing, the fish and chips were not fried in vegetable oil, it was fried in good old animal grease, what we call lard over here in the US.

BenThere
21st May 2014, 18:24
Much of what is now considered 'posh nosh' was once upon a time peasant food

If the lore is to be believed, the poor kids in Maine a couple of generations ago were sent off to school with lunch boxes of lobster sandwiches, lobster being the most available and economical protein ready to hand. How they must have suffered!

con-pilot
21st May 2014, 20:24
Much of what is now considered 'posh nosh' was once upon a time peasant food,

Very true, at the turn of the last century, 1900, the most expensive meat one could order in a New York City restaurant was chicken. As there was no refrigeration back in those times, the chickens were kept alive in the back of the restaurant, then killed, cleaned, cooked to order and then served.

Lobster, oysters, clams, mussels and etc. were considered junk or poor peopleís fare.

500N
21st May 2014, 20:34
I was in a very good, discount meat shop the other day. They tend to sell
lots at cheap prices but the quality is still there.

Was having a look for a Pork leg and noticed some small portions of Pork Belly - and I mean small, 10 - 12 inch wide flap folded over so it was
probably 12 x 12 in total.

The price - $17.34 :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes: (I probably throw away between $100 and $500 worth of Pork belly a year, I did this year)

I nearly had a heart attack, especially when I spotted last night a "managers special" of a Pork Leg at $4.99 a kg and the whole thing (two different legs) were only $14 and $17 !

Can't understand it how offal, off cuts have become so expensive !

Lonewolf_50
21st May 2014, 23:16
Scarcity does funny things to price. So does marketing. ;)

500N
21st May 2014, 23:21
This is not due to scarcity !!!

Good marketing !!!

MagnusP
22nd May 2014, 10:42
Good marketing + demand fuelled by chefs who are reintroducing lesser-used cuts to the public. "WOW! If Tom Kitchin is serving pig's ear, it must be good; get into the queue at the butcher!" (Properly cooked, it IS very good, BTW).

Had some hot-smoked salmon last night, with Jersey Royals and a rocket and pea-shoot salad. Pork sausages tonight. :ok:

Yeah; Brit food is rubbish, eh? :ugh:

Tankertrashnav
22nd May 2014, 10:46
Good marketing !!!


Precisely - who would have thought 20 - 30 years ago we would have whole supermarket aisles stocked up with water?

Worrals in the wilds
22nd May 2014, 10:46
If the lore is to be believed, the poor kids in Maine a couple of generations ago were sent off to school with lunch boxes of lobster sandwiches, lobster being the most available and economical protein ready to hand. How they must have suffered! Ausssie/Italian comedian Vince Sorrenti does a great routine wrt oysters, and how people used to laugh at the Italian immigrants collecting oysters off the Sydney rocks. Now the aforementioned oysters are worth about a million dollars a kilogram. :\

Ancient Mariner, what is that? Jurassic Lunch? :eek: