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Nervous SLF
14th May 2014, 03:06
I expect you drinkers know this already but for those who don't yer tiz.

www.worldwhiskyday.com (http://www.worldwhiskyday.com).

.

Dushan
14th May 2014, 03:17
I expect con-pilot will be officiating.

Saratogapp
14th May 2014, 08:48
I really like to be ahead of the game, thus (spookily enough) I started my own personal celebration about 10 short minutes ago.

onetrack
14th May 2014, 08:58
Hoots, mon! Ah'll drink tae that!! :ok:

We'll hae a recital of the Great Calamity to remind oorsels o' the less fortunate!

http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/513138-favourite-poems-6.html

Groundgripper
14th May 2014, 09:19
So it's World Hangover Day on Sunday, then?:E

GG

onetrack
14th May 2014, 09:56
'Tis only those lower class beer-swillers, that develop a hangover, laddie! :)

Gude whiskey is sipped, and tasted, and tickles ye throat and taste buds, like the loving touch of a fair highland maiden! :ok:

PLovett
14th May 2014, 11:01
And just where was the world's best whisky made this year..................:E

onetrack
14th May 2014, 11:27
PLovett - Sssssshhhh!! Those Taswegian whiskey makers probably have Scottish ancestry, anyway! :)

airship
14th May 2014, 18:19
Very glad and even somewhat reassured, to see that Ballantine's (my own tipple) are not an official sponsor to this event.

**** all those countries who stupidly, unreasonably and inconsiderately over-tax staples such as Scotch though. Perhaps we should be the ones who go out and torch public buildings on a weekend though. :ok: :uhoh:

con-pilot
14th May 2014, 19:21
I expect con-pilot will be officiating.

Yes I will, at least in my bar I will. :ok:

B Fraser
14th May 2014, 20:10
If I may make a minor correction, it's "The best country in the world whisky day" this coming Saturday.

Strangely, I'm savouring a nice calvados as I type this. You have to share the love I suppose.

HyFlyer
14th May 2014, 20:34
Simple....

EVERY day is single malt Scotch whisky day......:ok:

Zaphod Beblebrox
14th May 2014, 23:40
I intend to hold up the American side here. I will make it a point to have an evening with my good friend Jack Daniels. To be as correct as possible it is actually Bourbon, but still a member of the Whiskey family.

I invite all those to uphold the locally or regionally distilled spirit that meets the requirements to be called Whiskey.

gupta
15th May 2014, 04:39
The queue for an entry ticket to con's bar starts here...

sirwa69
15th May 2014, 08:12
I had a dry run last night, although it wasn't dry Hic!

I suppose what I should have said is that I had a practise night last night, its hard to think coherently when your head is screaming at you Hic! BURP hIC!

Roll on Saturday, I have a nice Port Wood finish Glenmorangie just staring at me across the bar........................bugger, I'm in the mood now, it might not last :O

Andy_P
15th May 2014, 10:35
Did not know there was a world whisky day, but I am up for it. Not sure what everyone else is into, but for me its the islay single malts. Got a bit of a collection here, but have to say for me the ardbeg that really gets my juices flowing.

onetrack
15th May 2014, 13:44
Andy - There's some extremely varied opinions below, on your peaty Ardbeg malt.

https://www.danmurphys.com.au/product/DM_903743/ardbeg-10-year-old-scotch-whisky-700ml

The nicest I've been able to afford is a bottle of 18 yr old Glenfiddich Ancient Reserve.
Added to filtered water with ice made from the same water, and it's verily, nectar of the gods.

Basil - That's a good move as regards the grandweans; and it sounds like you have the gift-givers sorted, as regards your birthday requirements. Had a birthday myself a couple of days ago, but no-one gave me any whiskey! :(

Lightning Mate
15th May 2014, 14:03
My ex-wifes' uncle, one Pat Mair, was the senior stillman at Fuddich for forty years.


'Twas he who advised to never pay for a malt more than nine years old.


He said that after that time the spirit derives nothing further from the cask.


He knew what he was talking about and I have heeded his advice ever since.


Slange.

Andy_P
15th May 2014, 14:17
Andy - There's some extremely varied opinions below, on your peaty Ardbeg malt.

Yup, the peat is not for everyone.. I have in my collection, ardbeg alligator, lagavulin, bunahabhain (or however you spell it) and caol ila.

Best time to drink scotch, after a good meal. Forget your cognac and crap, a neat scotch is the perfect end to dinner. And a good end to dinner means more than one :ok:

MagnusP
15th May 2014, 14:37
Forget your cognac and crap,

Nothing wrong with a good crap after dinner. :p

Ardbeg Uigeadail or Laphroaig Quarter Cask for me, please.

TomJoad
15th May 2014, 20:33
I'm safeguarding a 20 year old Port Dundas for the 18 Sep - celebrating or commiserating one way or the other it's going to be enjoyed.:ok:

PLovett
16th May 2014, 03:50
Added to filtered water with ice made from the same water, and it's verily, nectar of the gods.


WATER for pity's sake.........it rots your boots, just imagine what it'll do to your stomach. NEAT man.....thats the way to drink it. :ok:

chevvron
16th May 2014, 04:35
First time you taste Laphroig, you think there's something wrong with it, so you have to try another just to make sure, by which time you think it's not so bad after all.
There's a chap who flies from Fairoaks who owns a distillery on Islay (also owns a merchant bank)
In the Officer's mess at Manston, asked for a Glenmorangie; barman asks would I like something with it; I reply 'pardon'! He says 'oh sorry sir'. Couple of days later, not enough left in the optic for a full measure (must've been some other b'stard drinking it - surely I couldn't have drunk the lot) so he offers it to me gratis!

TomJoad
16th May 2014, 18:47
Well just like music everybody has their own taste and there no right or wrong way to drink whisky - it's entirely an individual thing. A spot of water is the traditional form in Scotland - it releases more of the flavour (flavonoids). This is particularly so for the cask strength and grain whiskies. But anyway, drink it how you like it and enjoy, a fine whisky is one of life's pleasures.:ok:

BabyBear
16th May 2014, 18:54
Love the stuff. Agree a little water releases flavours from cask strength, 'Standard' strength already has it added.

BB

PS now I am in the mood and the cupboard's bare.

Capetonian
1st Jun 2014, 14:16
I was fortunate to have celebrated WWD in Edinburgh, where I had a very pleasant day starting with the new tram and then spent a few hours walking around the 'tourist trail' and buying a bottle of the newest Ardbeg Auriverdes on the Royal Mile from one of the tourist shops, no doubt paid a premium for the location but it will last me a year and the pleasure of buying it from there rather than a bottle store elsewhere is well worth the possible extra few pounds spent.

It is, of course, a top quality whisky and according to the Ardbeg website, already sold out.

Ardbeg Auriverdes | Ardbeg (http://www.ardbeg.com/ardbeg/auriverdes)

TomJoad
1st Jun 2014, 15:24
I'm a big Ardbeg fan and this one sounds lovely, perfect for special occasions. You savour it Capetonian. And you are right, in the gloomy winter months, you will enjoy it all the more thinking about your enjoyable day in Edinburgh when you bought it:ok:

Tom

Um... lifting...
1st Jun 2014, 17:16
ZB-

I intend to hold up the American side here. I will make it a point to have an evening with my good friend Jack Daniels. To be as correct as possible it is actually Bourbon, but still a member of the Whiskey family.

Actually, JD tain't strictly Bourbon 'tall, if you ask a Tennesseean. Now the gummint in the guise of NAFTA maintains that 'tis straight Bourbon, but the makers maintain tain't. So, legally, it's Bourbon. Spiritually, tain't.

It's Tennessee whiskey which, in general, is subjected to a thing called the Lincoln County Process. Likewise, many purists boycott those whiskeys that have been purchased by Japanese consortia (American whiskeys becoming popular with discerning Asian customers over the years).

Lest this seem to be pedantic, would an Islay man wish his tipple to be called Highland? Or would he be calmly accepting of his peaty Ardbeg or Laphroaig being generically called simply "Scotch". One thinks not.

Lately, one has been sampling the potables purveyed through the good offices of High West Distillery, which probably are difficult to come by outside American shores.

TomJoad
1st Jun 2014, 19:07
ZB-


Lest this seem to be pedantic, would an Islay man wish his tipple to be called Highland? Or would he be calmly accepting of his peaty Ardbeg or Laphroaig being generically called simply "Scotch". One thinks not.




I understand what you are getting at Um but I've never really given any credence to names, categorisation, ownership etc. All of that is marketing smoke and mirrors. I just go on taste - if I like it, that's good enough for me. JD has its place, but it's a different place than the better single malts. Jut my opinion.

Tom

onetrack
2nd Jun 2014, 09:13
Reading an item about whisky the other day, and the distillery manager of Ardbeg states that a wee drap o' water at the right temperature (16-18 deg C) "opens" the whisky up.
If the water is too cold, he says the whisky "closes up". I guess he's a man who'd know. :) I still know what I like. :)

What type of whisky fan are you? (http://www.watoday.com.au/executive-style/top-drop/what-type-of-whisky-fan-are-you-20140529-3975x.html)

bar fly
2nd Jun 2014, 09:50
If you ever come across a bottle of Midleton Very Rare I strongly recommend that you take advantage. It isn't cheap (even the latest years) but is beautiful stuff, and the finest that has passed my lips.


Midleton Very Rare - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midleton_Very_Rare)

TomJoad
2nd Jun 2014, 12:14
Reading an item about whisky the other day, and the distillery manager of Ardbeg states that a wee drap o' water at the right temperature (16-18 deg C) "opens" the whisky up.
If the water is too cold, he says the whisky "closes up". I guess he's a man who'd know. :) I still know what I like. :)

What type of whisky fan are you? (http://www.watoday.com.au/executive-style/top-drop/what-type-of-whisky-fan-are-you-20140529-3975x.html)

The man from Ardbeg has my vote - a wee drop of water releases more of the flavour.

MFC_Fly
2nd Jun 2014, 12:21
But anyway, drink it how you like it and enjoy, a fine whisky is one of life's pleasures.:ok:
Will wonders never cease - I actually find myself agreeing with you for once :eek:

The only way to drink whisky is the way YOU like it :ok:

Capetonian
2nd Jun 2014, 13:08
I drink whisky neat, but was told that adding a few drops of water brings out the flavour, but that if you do this, the water should be pure and flavourless.

TomJoad
2nd Jun 2014, 13:34
I drink whisky neat, but was told that adding a few drops of water brings out the flavour, but that if you do this, the water should be pure and flavourless.

Agreed, and be wary of ice cubes - the flavour can often taint the whisky. Must admit though sometimes I do find some whisky better neat. It's all about experimenting and enjoying it.

MagnusP
2nd Jun 2014, 14:39
Ice cubes, as well as dulling the flavour, can also cloud the dram (harmlessly) as fatty esters precipitate out. When I could still drink whisky (:{), I preferred an Islay cask strength, non-cool-chill-filtered, with about 20% room temperature water added.

AtomKraft
2nd Jun 2014, 14:53
The trick is to use water out of a tap.

Ideally, some of the soft, cool water found coming out of taps in Glasgow would be ideal. ;)

Another vote for Ardbeg. I had a bottle of Uigedall. A real treat, if a wee bit pricey. :ok:

MagnusP
2nd Jun 2014, 14:57
Another vote for the Uigideall. I also liked Laphroiag quarter-cask and, if I had to stray on to the mainland, Longrow from Campbelltown.