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magpienja
13th May 2014, 10:25
Hi all....I'm hiring a car from the airport I fly into in July...I always worry when I hire a car that if it gets damaged I will get stung for the normal large excess,

Is there an extra insurance I can take out that will give me piece of mind that wont break the bank...I normally hire from Europcar Car Rental,

LOSS DAMAGE WAIVER (Excess to GBP 1035.00) is what bothers me...they do quote....Super loss Damage Waiver GBP 62.60 if req....I wonder does that cover the excess in the event of damage...As you can see I'm not a freq car hire user,

Its damage in the likes of a car park that bothers me where I have no control over it.

Nick.

glad rag
13th May 2014, 10:53
I had a 500 excess on the works rentals when I was in France. Insurance even for piece of mind, is a good idea.

Had lots of fun and games with various rental companies, just make sure you check the vehicle thoroughly inside and out before taking it away.

Can you speak even a little French? it helps.

gr

500N
13th May 2014, 11:00
Glad

"Had lots of fun and games with various rental companies, just make sure you check the vehicle thoroughly inside and out before taking it away."

I now wander around and take photos with my mobile, only takes
about 8 or so to get both angles of most panels.

And maybe one or two of any "spots" I see that they haven't marked off.

Although the companies here aren't too bad, never had them bitch
about anything !

Metro man
13th May 2014, 11:01
Definitely take out you own policy to cover the excess rather than use the one offered by the company. One off and annual policies are available. I've used this one before but others are available.

Cheap worldwide Travel Insurance, Single Trip Holiday Insurance, Car Hire Excess Insurance (http://www.worldwideinsure.com)

Capetonian
13th May 2014, 11:08
Or Car Hire Excess Insurance | Insurance4CarHire (http://www.insurance4carhire.com/) I have used them for years, excellent.

The biggest drawback with renting a car in France is French drivers.

sitigeltfel
13th May 2014, 11:23
The biggest drawback with renting a car in France is French drivers.
And drivers who have little or no experience of driving on the right.

glad rag
13th May 2014, 11:30
86.5% of french drivers are defensive drivers, it's the remaining ones that you have to really watch out for.....bet you've never seen what happens when it snows in Toulouse have ya :ok:

I never had a problem emerging from, say, a side street as, unlike the UK, they believe in manners...

ELondonPax
13th May 2014, 11:41
All car hire operators (right across Europe, not just France) are very strict on damage control. You should get a sheet when you collect the car showing pre existing damage. Unless the car is brand new - it will have some damage - they always pick up some scrapes. Make sure every scratch or scrape is already logged (including windscreen marks), and check the car before you drive away. If you spot pre existing damage that hasn't been logged, insist that the damage sheet is amended (and signed) before you leave the depot.
If there is any further damage during your rental (however caused) expect that it will be picked up - and if you haven't taken their insurance you will be charged.
I have my own annual insurance policy. It works fine for me. You need to be aware that if there is damage you will be charged immediately then you have to reclaim it from your insurer. I'm fine with that but some people don't want to accept the hassle.

CHAIRMAN
13th May 2014, 12:14
Touring the UK in September.
Leased a vehicle from the local travel agent here in Aussie - and now find out it's LHD:eek:
Sounds like a disaster in the making. I'm going to try and change to RHD.
Look out if I cant:ouch:

magpienja
13th May 2014, 12:37
Thanks guys lots of helpful advice,

So am I correct in thinking that if I pay for the "Super loss Damage Waiver @ GBP 62.60" that the car hire company want to sell...this will cover me for any excess I may incur.

500N
13th May 2014, 12:39
Your car hire places over there sound like Nazis.

Glad ours are a bit friendlier.

sitigeltfel
13th May 2014, 13:39
I have not hired a vehicle in France for some time but one constant complaint on pick-up was the stench of cigarette smoke. If you get one like that keep moaning and they might end up giving you a new fresh one.
If they offer a much bigger vehicle as an upgrade, think before you accept it. While main roads are very good, the country roads can be narrow and intimidating, especially if you are driving on what might be the "wrong" side.

Tailgating and gesticulating are normal and any incident can be diffused by shouting "branleur"! ;)

Davidsoffice
13th May 2014, 13:53
I've hired in France numerous times over the past couple of years and always take out the increased collision waiver to reduce the amount of excess.
I've never had a problem with cigarette smoke in any car I've hired from any of the major companies and all have been clean at pick up though not so clean at drop off! Only once have I been charged a cleaning fee!

My major problem recently has been the need for a substantial deposit or two credit cards depending on the rental company. Last year it was just Avis that didn't need credit cards, just a debit card and a reasonable deposit.

ExSp33db1rd
14th May 2014, 04:55
Touring the UK in September.
Leased a vehicle from the local travel agent here in Aussie - and now find out it's LHD

What twisted dwarf rented you a LHD drive car for use in the UK ?

Never ( never say never ) had a problem switching from LHD countries to RHD countries providing that the steering wheel relates to the country in use, but once returned from the USA and took my motor bike out at night ( RHD country ) Driving home - yes, some small modicum of alcohol had been consumed - down a narrow lane I espied the glow of approaching headights, and had a moment of panic as I didn't know which side I should be on ! I got it right,( left that is ) as otherwise I wouldn't be writing this !

moosp
14th May 2014, 05:53
I have also used Insurance4carhire and can recommend them. But when I tried to renew my annual insurance with them they told me the rules have changed and I have to be an EEC resident to be insured. As I am not I had to go elsewhere.

If you have Amex they may still have the excess insurance built into the card if you use it to pay for the rental. If you are resident in the USA your standard credit card often has hire cover. And also from the States, your own personal car insurance often has rental cover included. Shame it is not common for car insurance world wide.

Cyber Bob
14th May 2014, 08:15
'Brrinnngg, Brrinnngg'

Husband: Hello

Wife: Hi Honey, be careful on the way home. Just seen the news and there's some eegit driving on the wrong side of the motorway

Husband: One nutter? - there's dozen's of 'em out here love

Worrals in the wilds
14th May 2014, 09:14
If they offer a much bigger vehicle as an upgrade, think before you accept it. While main roads are very good, the country roads can be narrow and intimidating, especially if you are driving on what might be the "wrong" side.
Ooh yeah :ooh:. I hired a car for a week in Avignon and gave it back to them two hours later :O, fortunately without pranging it (though there were a couple of close calls). The combination of narrow, crowded streets and left hand drive scared the heck out of me, not to mention the very tired, unco-operative hire-car gear box that seemed to be trying to kill me.
I stuck with trains and buses after that, and found that the French public transport system was absolutely excellent.

moosp
14th May 2014, 09:18
Just looked through the docs for a Corolla I rented in Sydney a couple of weeks ago from a company that gave up using the "We try harder" marketing jingle when they stopped trying harder...

The daily rate was A$ 43.00 and the daily excess insurance came to $24 per day extra.

On a yearly basis that's $8,760. I could probably insure a 456 Ferrari for a 19 year old for that money, so you can see it is a rip off. It is well worth it to be able to turn to them and say, "No, I have my own insurances."

They also add "Registration Tax" at $6.50 (are they going to rent it out un-registered?)

Capot
14th May 2014, 10:30
I never had a problem emerging from, say, a side street as, unlike the UK, they believe in manners..Wasn't/Isn't there a rule about "Priorite a Droite"? Even if it's lapsed, or only applies when there's a sign telling you it does, I do know that lot of French drivers act as if it's in force at any T-junction. Emerging as you describe, you would have priority if/where the rule applies. If the other driver expects you to think that you have priority, they will let you out anyway in case you do think that and act accordingly. If you are the other driver, it pays to assume that the emerger thinks he/she has priority.