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View Full Version : Badly designed products that have been unchanged for years


Mechta
9th May 2014, 01:47
A salute to all those products that have been around for years despite irritating you by how poorly they do their job, yet their manufacturers have never bothered to improve them.

To start the ball rolling, I offer soft jaws for vices, of the type shown. They either fall off when doing the vice up, because the balance is all wrong, or get stuck on if you hammer the tags round enough to prevent this.

http://uk.farnell.com/productimages/farnell/standard/42355617.jpg

Better designs are available (e.g. magnetic), but every workshop seems to have a set of this type waiting to cause annoyance.

What product is your pet hate?

India Four Two
9th May 2014, 02:39
Mechta,

Your nomination is well deserved, but somewhat specialized.

For something which generates more universal loathing, I nominate British Supermarket Trollies/BAA Luggage Trollies with four castering wheels. How could any self-respecting engineer have thought that was a good idea?

In North America, "shopping carts/baggage carts" come with fixed wheels at the rear, making them easy to steer. Just like a car - what a novel idea. ;)

Buster Hyman
9th May 2014, 03:41
I am reliably informed that Swedish Penis Enlarger pumps don't work. I pity all those blokes that have shelled out a small fortune....:O

Fox3WheresMyBanana
9th May 2014, 03:47
..and the number of girls who use tampons, yet still can't ride a bike or play tennis worth a damn like they do in the ads......;)

PLovett
9th May 2014, 04:01
Windows..........the computer ones. Never have so many people wasted so much money and time on something so bleedin' irritating. :mad:

onetrack
9th May 2014, 04:04
Hammers are top of the list. Despite being invented by cavemen and having been in use for 40,000 years, this pathetic piece of design work has improved very little in that 40,000 years.
Fancy handles have been added and head shapes altered - but the f%%$#* things still manage to hit your thumb or other hand parts with agonising results, on regular occasions. :{
In this day and age, surely someone with a modicum of design skills could have easily produced a hammer that instantly swerves away from any contact with a human hand in milliseconds, when it becomes mis-directed. :(

500N
9th May 2014, 04:10
The Can opener type with the circular saw tooth type blade.

It might be the design but it also might be the makers but either way, they fall apart or become loose that they are utterly useless for opening cans.

John Hill
9th May 2014, 04:21
The wheel might have been a great invention in its time but the round shape is totally wrong for applications where maximum contact area is required. Obviously the worst possible shape where traction or braking is required, square wheels would be much better for almost every application.

Lantern10
9th May 2014, 05:27
What about tables with four legs, they always wobble.:ugh:
Three legs will never wobble, plus three is cheaper than four.

The Nr Fairy
9th May 2014, 06:23
Evolution surely has produced one of the most fundamental (if you pardon the pun) cockups.

Pleasure parks near sewage outlets ? Please...

parabellum
9th May 2014, 06:32
In North America, "shopping carts/baggage carts" come with fixed wheels at the rear, making them easy to steer


In Taipei Airport they decided to go for the trolley with only one set of wheels that castored, trouble is they picked the front for the fixed wheels and the back for the castored! Hundreds of people with their trolley piled high milling round the terminal and all pulling their trolley behind them!

stevef
9th May 2014, 07:03
http://img.airport-data.com/images/aircraft/thumbnails/000/424/424936.jpg

The aircraft that evolution passed by. :)

mikedreamer787
9th May 2014, 07:28
..........
Me. http://www.mysmiley.net/imgs/smile/ashamed/ashamed0001.gif

Capetonian
9th May 2014, 07:33
Mothers-in-law.
Sisters.
Sticky tape rolls that you can never find the beginning of.
Radios with poxy little electronic buttons. Give me one with great big push buttons and rotary knobs :

Bring back these (made in Rhodesia ..... and they worked.)
http://www.radiomuseum.org/images/radio/supersonic_bulawayo/d28a_1495124.jpg
http://www.radiomuseum.org/images/radio/supersonic_bulawayo/ar125_1613537.jpg

acbus1
9th May 2014, 07:39
Marriage. :rolleyes:

goudie
9th May 2014, 07:41
Corned beef tins. Bloody things never open properly.


Teenagers

Akrotiri71
9th May 2014, 07:57
I was going to say SPAM tin keys.

A tiny little key that, when used, puts one's fingers perilously close to two razor-sharp edges, & results in an equally razor-sharp ribbon of metal.

Then it's a buggah to get the bloody stuff out!! Grr! :{

mikedreamer787
9th May 2014, 08:04
Airbus Industrie.

Deliberately complicating simplicity since 1980.

sitigeltfel
9th May 2014, 08:09
For something which generates more universal loathing, I nominate British Supermarket Trollies
Possible explanation

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02905/Matt-web-May-9_2905656a.jpg

tony draper
9th May 2014, 08:37
How about this,just when you think it is finished and working properly bits of it start to fall or break and hurt sometimes for no reason whatsoever,and this poor example hasn't even come with a willy.:(
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/second%20album/9TRbGzdTe_zps02375d02.jpeg (http://s11.photobucket.com/user/Deaddogbay/media/second%20album/9TRbGzdTe_zps02375d02.jpeg.html)

UniFoxOs
9th May 2014, 08:50
Better designs are available (e.g. magnetic)

They ain't any better. I bought some plastic ones with magnetic strips, especially because they had grooves for holding round material horizontal or vertical. These not only fall off the vice at every opportunity, but don't even hold the part firmly, so are actually a disimprovement.

Yamagata ken
9th May 2014, 08:56
BMC A Series engines. 20,000 miles, timing chain starts rattling. 40,000 miles; premature wear of the rocker shaft. Can't set valve clearances accurately. 50,000 miles; premature wear in the distributor shaft and carburettor spindle. Can't set the dwell angle or the mixture accurately. 70,000 miles; premature wear in the cylinders, starts burning oil. Nine-bolt (cantilevered) cylinder head. Head gasket failure probable at any time. Pissant transfer hose between head and block, can fail at any time requiring removal and replacement of the head.

Worrals in the wilds
9th May 2014, 09:49
http://www.electriduct.com/assets/images/3m%20adhesive%20hooks%20and%20hangers.jpg
Great if you want to murder a picture, generally at about 3AM when it falls to its death with a resounding clang/shattering sound. Useless for anything else. :*

Ancient Mariner
9th May 2014, 11:24
Soft jaws for vice? Sheet of lead, cut to size, hammer to fit, problem solved. Never used anything else.
Per

Lon More
9th May 2014, 11:28
Did you leave a big hole in the church roof AM?

OFSO
9th May 2014, 11:41
Tony, I was going to say women.....

Never shut up.
Never agree.
Always find fault.
High maintenance.
Fun bits are located near to the sewage department.

I keep expecting evolution to step in and improve things, but don't think I'm going to live long enough. Which, now I come to think of it, is how evolution will solve my whinging.

Ancient Mariner
9th May 2014, 11:44
Lon More: Did you leave a big hole in the church roof AM?

Only a small one. Never been on a ship that didn't use lead for the vice in the engine room's work shop.
Per

Keef
9th May 2014, 11:50
Did you leave a big hole in the church roof AM?

For other reasons, I've been looking up old Suffolk Faculties (ecclesiastical planning permissions, effectively). It's surprising how many I found in the 1820s-1850s to "remove lead from roof and replace with slate".

The documents I saw gave permission; they didn't state why it was being done.

500N
9th May 2014, 11:55
Keef

I thought lead was used to seal the edges and joins ?

Regardless of what the roof was made of ?

Was the whole roof made of lead ?

Just interested.

Mechta
9th May 2014, 13:54
The dishwasher at the Saturday morning eatery is a particularly unreliable beast, so its not unusual to see the disposable plastic cutlery brought out.

The knife and fork have slightly less compressive strength than the toast or fried bread served, so a pile of broken plastic accumulates through the meal. In addition, the fork handle has so little torsional stability, it is quite an achievement when it reaches one's mouth with food still attached.

http://www.refreshmentshop.co.uk/images/white_plastic_cutlery.jpg

tony draper
9th May 2014, 14:00
Large areas of flat roofs used to be covered in lead sheets,posh houses stately homes and such.
:uhoh:

500N
9th May 2014, 14:03
Metcha

I'd carry one of those KFS sets with me if that was the case.

Hate plastic crap.

Boudreaux Bob
9th May 2014, 14:04
Bell Helicopter Pilot Seats......nothing more needs said!:mad::mad:

sitigeltfel
9th May 2014, 14:13
Not sure if it can be described as a first in 8000 years, but a retired Finnish Air Traffic Controller has invented a better axe.

The Leveraxe (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2623425/Inventor-comes-redesign-axe-8-000-years-curved-blade-stops-swinging-straight-wood-leg.html)

Better still, get your wood delivered chopped and stove ready :ok:

onetrack
9th May 2014, 14:13
Mechta - YES!!! My pet hate, as well!! Bloody useless plastic knives, forks and spoons!!
All manufactured to the lowest bid price - and designed to be utterly incapable of the job they're supposed to do!!

Rwy in Sight
9th May 2014, 14:39
Politicians.

Rwy in Sight

simon brown
9th May 2014, 14:45
Service Station steel tea pots with cup avoiding spouts where the tea goes everywhere but the spout.

That's after you've pulled the cuff of your jersey down to protect against the heat of the cleverly designed steel handle.

Lightning Mate
9th May 2014, 15:18
TIGHTS !


Wot 's wrong wiv stockings ?

glad rag
9th May 2014, 15:24
The UK MOD?

Um... lifting...
9th May 2014, 15:35
Tea.

Nothing vexes the Briton as does tea. If not for tea, simon brown's jersey cuff would be unstretched and his brow untroubled.

Hot beverages and cold baths. Britain at a glance.

radeng
9th May 2014, 17:39
Keef,

Could some of the lead replacement have been that by 1833, the technique for getting silver out of the lead had improved to the point that the lead roofs were worth more, while at the same time, the price of slate had dropped?

I read somewhere that a few years back (but this century) that an enterprising vicar discovered from his records that his church had a lead roof dating back to the 1700s. It was found worthwhile to have the roof stripped and replaced and still have money over from the sale as scrap of the high silver content lead.

Kiltrash
9th May 2014, 18:05
Digital cameras.......

In the old days you would need to buy a 24 or 36 exposure of Kodak finest, set the picture up in the frame correctly, dont fiddle with the minimal buttons / options breath in hold your breath and press the shutter. Take the film, when finished, to Boots (other photo processing facilities are available) wait for 2-3 days and go back to collect the prints and gaze lovingly at them

Now snap 1000 pictures in different settings of any old jumbo jet, download and NEVER look at them again, buy a new 1000Tb external Hard Drive

angels
9th May 2014, 18:29
I have a kettle that dribbles water down the side when you pour the water out There are quite a few teapots around that do the same.

They can't even get a frigging spout right. :mad:

crippen
9th May 2014, 20:41
A forum I know of has been around since 1996 and still manages to have phantom pages ! :E

tony draper
9th May 2014, 20:52
Cylindrical tea cups,next door has em,one cannot stir furiously as one tends to do without the tea slopping into the saucer,this phenomena does not occur in proper cup shaped cups.
:uhoh:
Oh yes and square feckin dinner plates, I hate them bastards.:=

stagger
9th May 2014, 20:54
Separate hot and cold (non-mixer) taps in public toilet facilities.

What are you supposed to do?

If there's a plug (unlikely) then fill the sink (which is probably filthy) to get water of the correct temperature?

Or rapidly switch your hands back and forth between scalding hot and freezing cold streams?

Keef
9th May 2014, 20:57
Keef

I thought lead was used to seal the edges and joins ?

Regardless of what the roof was made of ?

Was the whole roof made of lead ?

Just interested.

It does seem so.

Another afternoon working through the faculties book at the Record Office didn't find the two I was looking for, but did find a lot more to "sell the lead, replace with slates". It seems that prior to the early 19th century, the roofs of quite a few Suffolk and Norfolk churches were lead-covered. I didn't know that previously.

Of our three, one has lead on the roof to seal some corners - recently repaired(I've been up there to inspect it). One has an area of flat roof, now plastic-covered because the lead was stolen three times in six months: the insurance refused to buy any more. One is blessedly undisturbed and I have no idea what's on the roof.

Keef
9th May 2014, 20:59
Keef,

Could some of the lead replacement have been that by 1833, the technique for getting silver out of the lead had improved to the point that the lead roofs were worth more, while at the same time, the price of slate had dropped?

That sounds highly plausible. The "rush" started around then. I found at least a couple of dozen "sell the lead, replace with slate" between 1820 and 1900.

wings folded
9th May 2014, 21:12
A church close by has a spolight or two aimed at the upper structures of a really quite nice edifice. Not the bell tower which is fairly distinctive and unusual in the region.

No.

The roof of the main body of the church (nave? help please, not religious) is clad in lead. So it is an anti thieving git artifice, not a "Let us allow folk to admire the bell tower" device.

Sad. Sad.

blue up
9th May 2014, 21:31
757/767 sun visors.

757/767 pilot seats.

Toilet seats. Surely there ought to be a better design out there???

Pencils. 8 inches long. Have you ever used one all the way to the end before it broke up?

Toasters. If we can put a man on the moon, why can't we make a toaster that browns bread evenly?

Lucas electrics. 'Nuf said!

The Julian Calendar.

SA 80.

Tannoy speaker systems.

737 overhead panel.

VP959
9th May 2014, 21:48
Tetra packs get my vote for being the most awkward form of packaging known, guaranteed to spill the contents whilst you struggle to get the damned things open.

In fact just about every form of modern packaging has been a retrograde step on tried and tested methods, the only exception being the screw top wine bottle...............

500N
9th May 2014, 21:52
VP

The only exception to that I would say is when they went from Carton's of milk to Screw top plastic bottles.

uffington sb
9th May 2014, 22:01
Mr D.
I thought ye were an old sea dog.
What's this not liking square dinner plates.
Square dinner plates come from the navy, three square meals a day.

Capetonian
9th May 2014, 22:07
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT1pb83cox8WQ_systOldWJnF5pTlGeSzw0p06G-Mbtw2Wlcdvc

These bloody things.
If you don't have decent fingernails you can't open them.
If you do, they often break (the ringpull, and/or the fingernails)
I like to drink out of the can at a braai or on the beach and then you have to wank the thing around to get it off, or it gets in the way of the beer.

tony draper
9th May 2014, 22:25
Please Mr Uffington when I went to sea our cannons were breech loaders.:rolleyes:

jimtherev
9th May 2014, 22:40
Windscreen wipers: crude contraptions which remove rain from the screen by dragging a piece of rubber across it. Design tweaked over the years, but basically 'tis the same as in the 1900s.
Pity the blades only last a few thousand miles, but still.


And on the lead debate: I was intrigued to see in some cities in Canada, roof coverings entirely made of alumin(i)um. Looks weird, but apparently cheaper in the long run than tiles, and vastly cheaper than lead.

barry lloyd
9th May 2014, 22:51
VP 959:

Ah yes, the Tetra-Pak. A creation of the Rausing family, who made a not insignificant amount of money from it, surprisingly. I concur that it is one of the most difficult packages to open.
Several of the family moved to the UK, but it was not without controversy:

BBC News - Eva Rausing found dead in Belgravia home (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-18789629)

Mechta
10th May 2014, 12:31
Tetra packs get my vote for being the most awkward form of packaging known, guaranteed to spill the contents whilst you struggle to get the damned things open.

In fact just about every form of modern packaging has been a retrograde step on tried and tested methods, the only exception being the screw top wine bottle............... Yes, VP959, Tetrapaks in all forms appear designed to cause maximum stress and aggravation. The ordinary ones are made from a material so tough, that they can't be opened without scissors. Tearing doesn't work and a knife is asking for injuries. Some have a moulded plastic pourer/lid, but these have a habit of coming partially unbonded when being opened for the first time, so causing leaks until this is discovered.

My pet favourite hate are the small ones that come with a straw. Usually children (and some dim adults) squeeze the flat sides of the box hard as they push the straw through the foil, resulting in a jet of fruit juice over all present when it finally goes through.

Even the manufacturers struggled with them:

2-p8YpR7rJc


The one thing that can be said for them is that they make a passable gasket material.

onetrack
10th May 2014, 12:43
Oh yes and square feckin dinner plates, I hate them bastards.:=Are you telling us, you're finding it difficult to get a well-rounded meal out of a square plate, Mr D? :)

Cacophonix
10th May 2014, 12:49
Badly designed products that have been unchanged for years...


I have always thought that when God designed women He was having a laugh! ;)

Caco

Capetonian
10th May 2014, 12:57
Funny that, because an ex-g/f of mine used to say that when God designed men, she was having a laugh!

ian16th
10th May 2014, 14:49
Jiimtherev
Windscreen wipers: Pity the blades only last a few thousand miles, but still.

I now know that this is location dependent

After many years of the dirty roads and ice & snow of the UK, here in sunny SA were it tends to rain very heavily or not at all, wiper blades last for years.

500N
10th May 2014, 15:02
I find wiper blades here in Aus are ruined by the sun more than anything else.

vulcanised
10th May 2014, 15:22
Keep them in the glovebox until it rains then. :ouch:

OFSO
10th May 2014, 15:48
Wiper blades need a lot of TLC; different sorts of care depending on where you live. In Germany you used to be able to buy supports to put under 'em when you parked in winter, so the rubber was held away from the glass.

seacue
10th May 2014, 16:07
blue up sayeth, in repect to poorly-designed products:
Pencils. 8 inches long. Have you ever used one all the way to the end before it broke up?

You would have been happy to have been a Civil Servant in the bad old days of Bevan's ?? Mini-Britain. Pencils in Govt offices were cut in two so that there were twice as many pencils. Of course they became too-short-to-use somewhat faster.

BenThere
10th May 2014, 17:22
I've treated the windshields of my cars with Rainex. All the rainwater beads up and blows off so that I hardly use the wipers anymore. Wish the airplanes I fly had it.

Sallyann1234
10th May 2014, 17:41
did find a lot more to "sell the lead, replace with slates". It seems that prior to the early 19th century, the roofs of quite a few Suffolk and Norfolk churches were lead-covered. I didn't know that previously.Simple reason: The lead was screening signals from 19th c. cellphones

Effluent Man
10th May 2014, 17:48
Renaults..

Krystal n chips
10th May 2014, 17:50
As various aspects of aviation have already been mentioned.....here's one that is more than qualified for the title

The A.T.P.

lomapaseo
10th May 2014, 17:54
I've treated the windshields of my cars with Rainex. All the rainwater beads up and blows off so that I hardly use the wipers anymore. Wish the airplanes I fly had it.

I seem to recall something about clear view in ships.

Can't you just put your plane into a spin and shed the rain that way?

UniFoxOs
10th May 2014, 18:45
Pencils. 8 inches long. Have you ever used one all the way to the end before it broke up?

Had to at one firm I worked for - you had to take the stub, which had to be less than a specified length, of your old one back to the stores to get a new one.

meadowrun
10th May 2014, 18:52
BenThere ------------------------------- Advertised for aircraft use

http://www.aircraftspruce.ca/catalog/graphics/09-42500.jpg

VP959
10th May 2014, 19:06
Quote:
Pencils. 8 inches long. Have you ever used one all the way to the end before it broke up?

Had to at one firm I worked for - you had to take the stub, which had to be less than a specified length, of your old one back to the stores to get a new one.

At the second lab I worked at, the stationery store was controlled by a Welshman who kept a junior hacksaw in the top drawer of his desk. Whenever you went to this chap and asked for a new pencil, he'd either give you half a pencil from his stock, or he'd get out a new one and carefully cut it in half. His comment was always the same: "I know you scientists, you'll always lose this before you've used it all up".

I think he'd come from the wartime generation, where being frugal with everything was the way everyone was brought up.

OFSO
10th May 2014, 19:29
Cut a potato in half and rub it on the windscreen !

R

Dushan
10th May 2014, 19:31
I've treated the windshields of my cars with Rainex. All the rainwater beads up and blows off so that I hardly use the wipers anymore. Wish the airplanes I fly had it.

I thought Rainex was routinely used on aircraft windshields.

I used to use it but on my car the combination of windshield and wipers somehow did not like it and smudges started to appear. Also the wipers would not flip when changing direction so they would make the "stuttering" noise. I stopped using it but the windshield was never the same, since.

Mechta
10th May 2014, 19:33
All this talk of parsimony with pencils has reminded me of another contender for this category; all those pencil sharpeners which break off 3/8" of the pencil lead, just as the new point is reaching completion...

I think he'd come from the wartime generation, where being frugal with everything was the way everyone was brought up.

Yep, that's Mechta Senior, he always has a ancient 2" long pencil in his back pocket. The pencil was probably first in service when the workplace was called The Balloon Factory.

Kiltrash
10th May 2014, 19:33
Shopping Loyalty Cards

All mommin have every store card, so where is the Loyalty?

Pubs, male area, dont have these cards, wonder why not?

Dee747
10th May 2014, 23:44
Candles.

Why do they still stink like hell when you snuff them out? And what's all that wisp of smoke about too? Gasping their last before dying?

I hate the bu**ers. Stink the place out every time they're lit. :mad: :mad:

alisoncc
11th May 2014, 01:44
Table knives. They should have a groove down the middle of the sharp bit to stop the peas rolling off sideways.

meadowrun
11th May 2014, 01:55
Dee747 - how to make use of that anomaly.


The Candle Trick.


1/ In a somewhat dark room - light a candle. Allow it a couple of seconds burning.
2/ Say to all and sundry - " I intend to light this candle but from 12 inches away .
3/ Ask one all and sundry to say a magic word.
4/ Blow out candle.
5/ Put lighter flame at the top of the smoke column.
6/ Flame will travel down the smoke column and re-light the wick.
7/ At least one all and sundry will gasp.

teeteringhead
11th May 2014, 09:30
blue up Lucas electrics. 'Nuf said!
I'm reminded by this of something I saw on the joke page of an American biker magazine some years ago: Q: Why do Brits drink warm beer?

A: Cos Lucas make their fridges! :ok:

500N
11th May 2014, 09:32
teetering

That is a good one :ok:

onetrack
11th May 2014, 11:22
Lucas electrics are the original anti-theft device.
The Lucas company Motto - "Get Home Before Dark".
If Lucas made guns, wars would never start.
Lucas is also the inventor of the intermittent wiper and self-dimming headlamps.
Lucas once diversified into vacuum cleaners. It was the only product they ever made, that didn't suck.

Capetonian
11th May 2014, 11:25
Paraphrasing an old joke :

Why did the sun never set on the British Empire?
(A. Because God didn't trust the Brits in the dark)
(B. Because the Brits didn't trust the darkies in the dark)

Because Lucas couldn't be relied upon to provide artificial lighting.

500N
11th May 2014, 11:26
You know, we talk about Lucas and cars.

I was told by my mechanic many years ago that the the wreckers used to break Bosch gear boxes that came out of imported cars (for spares) as they were too good and never broke down :rolleyes:

Limeygal
11th May 2014, 11:35
Cut a potato in half and rub it on the windscreen !

YES-I mentioned this to someone awhile back and they laughed at me. OFSO, you are the only other person I know who has heard of such a thing. I used to always have a spud with me when I had my first car, a little Fiat 500. The wipers were a bit iffy. :ok:

500N
11th May 2014, 11:37
Limeygal

I had also heard of it.

In fact, when I read it in OFSO's post above, I laughed because it
was such a long time ago that I heard it.

onetrack
11th May 2014, 11:37
500N - I may be corrected here - but Bosch have never built an automotive gearbox, to my knowledge. The Bosch-Rexroth company build industrial gearboxes for use in mining, industry, and wind turbines - but they don't get involved with automotive transmissions.
You may be thinking of ZF gearboxes? - a usually good, German automotive product (except when built by Ford, under licence). :(

spInY nORmAn
11th May 2014, 11:42
Ah yes - Lucas - Prince of Darkness!

http://www.triple-c.com/images_temp/1280480000bge_lucas3a.JPG

http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg20/tpribors/Miscellaneous/lucasswitch.jpg

Capetonian
11th May 2014, 11:43
The potato thing is an old trick. I drove from George to Cape Town in a 6 volt Beetle on a very wet and dark night, and the wipers stopped when you put the headlights on, and the headlights dimmed to nothing when you put the wipers on. Were it not for a couple of potatoes, I might not have made it.

500N
11th May 2014, 11:44
OneTrack

I am happy to stand corrected. It may well have been, it was 30 years ago :rolleyes:
I am pretty sure it was the gear box.



Didn't L R's have that toggle switch ???

500N
11th May 2014, 11:46
Old cars where the wipers slowed when the headlights were on etc.
Also indicators that got faster as you accelerated and almost stopped
when you were stationary at the lights.

Dushan
11th May 2014, 13:26
Never tried it but the potato thing was suggested as anti fogging method for a diver's mask.

FullOppositeRudder
12th May 2014, 01:43
Ball point pens.

All seem to be manufactured with the innate ability to disappear after first use, and to somehow congregate in a rarely searched drawer / cupboard / glove box only to be re-discovered months later when they invariably exhibit the symptoms below.

Those that are immune to this primary annoying predisposition either don't work at all, or else spontaneously conspire to leak their contents into the pocket of a newly laundered and ironed washed shirt at the earliest opportunity.

The caps supplied with them also disappear, or - if actually present by some miracle - fit only one of the other brands.

500N
12th May 2014, 01:48
Full

I agree.

Even if I grab loads of them and stash them all over, I still end up
a few weeks later without any.

mikedreamer787
12th May 2014, 06:35
Yep agree with the pen complaints above.

Most pens end up in one's shirt pocket. Fluid
dynamics dictate if the pen is upside down it
will take some shaking of the pen (or maybe
some disassembly so you can blow into the ink
plastic cartridge) before it will start writing.
The Parker mob et al knew this, which is why
their pens are designed the way they are. So
don't buy pens with removable covers. Always
get the retractable ones.

Another pet pissoff are milk cartons where you
have a silver seal with a pull tab so bloody tiny
it has no hope of sustaining the load you impose
to open the seal, and end up having to poke a
fork through it to get the milk out. This of course
results in the inevitable spillage of the first pour.

Yet another is hotel electronic door cards. The
chances of your door card failing is in tangential
proportion to how high your floor level is and how
busy the lifts (the ones that are working) at the
time, how many bags you are dragging to your
room because the bellboys are all busy, the fact
that the in house phone system at your level just
happens to fail, and the concierge and front desk
aren't answering your Iphone calls.

Bring back REAL door keys. No idiot is dumb enough
to rely on electronic keys to open the front door of
his own home! :*

ExSp33db1rd
12th May 2014, 10:31
Polo shirts without pockets. ( where do you keep your reading glasses -and no, a string around the neck won't do )

ExSp33db1rd
12th May 2014, 10:38
Shopping Loyalty CardsAbsolutely !!

We have similar things for fuel, Supermarkets give coupons for 4c off each litre if you spend more than $40, but if you spend more then $120 you still only get one coupon - so - I stop the till at $41 and pay, this takes some time, I then stop it twice more repeating the process. Such fun.

I usually end up with more coupons than I will ever need, so give them to my friends, or usually, because they expire after a month, end up throwing them away. Stupid system, why can't "they" just knock a couple of cents off the price of petrol, job done and a lot of time and money saved by everyone.

I only really used a loyalty card at one retailer in town, and just before I reached the magic 9 purchases - to get the 10th one free, the shop changed hands and the new prop. refuses to honour the previous cards.

A Pox on them all.

Rwy in Sight
12th May 2014, 10:39
Polo shirts without pockets. ( where do you keep your reading glasses -and no, a string around the neck won't do )

My father loves them and I have a hard time finding them. I hate them because I tend to overload the pockets. On the other hand I love vermuda shorts with large exterior pockets that end up needing a loading document to know what has been loaded where (wallet, two mobiles, keys, sunglasses).

Rwy in Sight

rjtjrt
12th May 2014, 11:46
ExSp33 wrotePolo shirts without pockets. ( where do you keep your reading glasses....)
Absolutely, as you say - and to find any with pocket is almost impossible now. A polo without a pocket is useless for a lot of us.

SawMan
12th May 2014, 11:55
Round door knobs.

With a sticky latch, wet hands, or even a band-aid in the wrong place they can be impossible :ugh: Levers are simpler and surer but knobs still prevail :confused:

Blacksheep
12th May 2014, 13:26
I suppose it has been mentioned already but I can't be bothered to read in.

Microsoft Windows.

OK at 3.11 but developed well beyond its ability to function properly since the 1998 version. I suppose Microsoft and the PC manufacturers are in too deep to back out and develop new computer architecture and write an operating system from scratch.

Smeagol
12th May 2014, 14:04
Slight thread drift so apologies:

How about reasonably designed items that have been "improved" to present a worse product than before!

A example of the above - light controlled, push button pedestrian crossings in city centres. Until recently these were straightforward, logical crossings, one arrived at the crossing looked directly ahead at the other side of the road where the visual display indicating the green or red man was clearly visible.
Someone has now 'improved' on these crossings to have the visual display on the traffic light support poles facing perpendicular to the pedestrian route. So as you approach the crossing one has to look at right angles to the direction of travel and when a crowd is assembled waiting to cross the lights are now much less visible.

How this an improvement?

seacue
12th May 2014, 15:02
Blacksheep

I suppose it has been mentioned already but I can't be bothered to read in.

Microsoft Windows.
I wonder how long before MS realizes that a fundamental rewrite is needed - and produces a new version of Windows based (internally) on UNIX. They would be joining Apple/OS X and Linux with a more-solid architecture. But, of course, that can be got wrong as well.

500N
12th May 2014, 15:16
rjt and others


If you want Large polo shirts in Aus, you can get them from the people who do the corporate logo type design. That's where I got my last lot from.

Rivers Australia also has some on an ad hoc basis - you just need to go in everytime you pass a Rivers shop.

or buy them on ebay as a last resort.

AtomKraft
12th May 2014, 15:22
What about those new- fangled CFL light bulbs?

The cost about five times as much, last about the same time or less, then pollute the environment with mercury vapour when disposed of. And the light they give off is utter crap.

Sure, you save a few pennies in lectricity, but the cost you more up front.

A complete pita.

airship
12th May 2014, 16:20
Noone has yet mentionned toilet-paper (rolls)...?!

I once innocently confectionned a pair of binoculars (where is Binos these days?) using the remnants of 2 inner-rolls and grey-duct tape on which I'd written "ZEISS 7X50", before throwing them down into the street one busy summer evening a few years ago. Several children rapidly discovered my "binos", much hilarity shared before they were simply discarded. Until one family passed by and the kids, like all the others joyously picked them up and started to play with them: "STOP! You don't know where it's been!" shouted one of their parents in a completely-foreign language which I never learned, but understood automatically by intonation...?!

Anyway, I congratulate Lotus' latest invention of the "AquaTube" core of their toilet rolls. And wish them well with their Formula 1 (or should that be F2?) endeavours and general car-making aspirations.

What we need today of course, are 2 toilet-rolls at our disposal. One from which we remove a single sheet so as to reduce "splash" effects initially. The other for normal use. Plus having a bidet so as to properly clean away our asses. :ok:

vulcanised
12th May 2014, 17:24
Binos died several years ago.

airship
12th May 2014, 18:15
I repeat, where is Binos these days?

G-CPTN
12th May 2014, 18:19
I repeat, where is Binos these days?
As mentioned, Binos 'left us' (and this Earth) some time ago.
In memoriam:- http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/178182-binos-pprune-world-retirement-tour.html#post1933231

con-pilot
12th May 2014, 20:17
I repeat, where is Binos these days?

Well, a few years ago he was standing in my bar knocking down a few Scotches.

Maybe he is still there, let me go check....

Get up, stretches, moans, groans,,,,,,,

Walks into kitchen, gets a glass of water, drinks it,,,

Walks across to bar,,,

Yells into seemly empty bar,,,

"Hey Chris, you still here or are you still dead?".

He said he's still dead.

Mac the Knife
12th May 2014, 21:46
"I wonder how long before MS realizes that a fundamental rewrite is needed - and produces a new version of Windows based (internally) on UNIX."

I wonder if you realise just how good an engineer Dave Cutler was? He wrote VMS and later NT and until people started sticking cruft all over it NT was a most elegant design. Now folks are cleaning up the codebase and designing clever workarounds for the obvious boo-boos (DLLs anyone?) it is getting pretty usable.

(Dave hated Unix with a passion BTW)

Mac

:ooh:

Lonewolf_50
12th May 2014, 21:50
Insofar as something I'll never understand the use of ... how in the hell does cellulite fit into an evolutionary benefit to the back of a leg or a buttock cheek?

What good is it? :confused:

Tankertrashnav
12th May 2014, 23:52
Why hasnt anyone invented a better system for securing the arms of spectacles to the main bit (excuse the technical terms!)

Every pair I have ever owned has ended up with the screw working loose and the arm falling off. Or do the posh ones that I cant afford have a different system?

alisoncc
13th May 2014, 00:15
I wonder if you realise just how good an engineer Dave Cutler was? He wrote VMS and later NTBS. Dave didn't write VMS or NT. VMS evolved from RSX-11M, with a bit of RSTS thrown in. Spent a lot of time at Maynard and Marlborough, and knew many of the guys who assembled VMS. Cutler just stole Micro-VMS at the behest of Bill Gates. Who it was said at the time employed more lawyers than programmers.

seacue
13th May 2014, 00:17
I've certainly heard of Dave Cutler, VMS, etc. But DEC closed the development lab he ran and he (and I gather the whole group) was hired by Microsoft. Whatever purity VMS and NT had seems to have been lost.

I find it curious that the basis of the widespread personal computer operating systems are attributed to a couple of people at Bell Labs or Cutler (ex DEC).

Rwy in Sight
13th May 2014, 08:02
how in the hell does cellulite fit into an evolutionary benefit to the back of a leg or a buttock cheek?

Not sure it is relevant here but I like the joke that goes around the last few weeks that the only ways men are going to get some peace and quitness (sp) at home is to persuade ladies that whining causes cellulite.


Rwy in Sight

500N
13th May 2014, 08:06
Rwy

I like that :ok: :D

ExSp33db1rd
13th May 2014, 11:11
Every pair I have ever owned has ended up with the screw working loose and the arm falling off.Agree, I have multi pairs of reading glasses lying around every room in the house - saves wondering where to put them when wearing a polo shirt with no pocket - all with one folding arm and one non-folding, 'cos rather than throw them away I re-attach by various means -epoxy glue, solder, heat-shrink tubing - depending on the design.

Most came from the $2.oo shop or equivalent, never paid more for any, so can't comment on whether the $200.oo ones are any better, I suspect not.

Once bought a pair with "lenses" that were solid, black plastic, with the "lenses" comprising of millions of very tiny holes, worked a treat, didn't matter what magnification one needed. I guess it was the same principle as a pin-hole camera, but the image wasn't upside down !

Got fed up with the queer looks I was getting, and they weren't very practical on the flight deck ! but still have them.

The only "proper" pair I' ve ever owned were those National Health half-moon things that were free, but they broke eventually, too.

Sunglasses don't seem to suffer from the same problem tho' ? Funny that.

500N
13th May 2014, 11:15
Ex

A mate of mine buys heaps of those cheap chemisty glasses
and like you have pairs everywhere.

MagnusP
13th May 2014, 11:19
The female larynx.

ExSp33db1rd
14th May 2014, 05:07
What we need today of course, are 2 toilet-rolls at our disposal.

Many bathroom suppliers now provide a toilet roll holder that carried two rolls, this more or less ensures that you don't find yourself pulling just the last sheet off a single available roll.

Had a mate who stacked 6 rolls on to to vertical rod, standing on some sort of base on the floor. Mrs. ExS said she'd refuse to use the last one, virtually stored on the floor for a few months. ( Not sure what her options were, tho')

Too fussy by half, some people ( cue to ... we DREAMED of toilet rolls, etc. )

500N
14th May 2014, 05:11
"Many bathroom suppliers now provide a toilet roll holder that carried two rolls, this more or less ensures that you don't find yourself pulling just the last sheet off a single available roll."


The real reason is so the lady of the house can have it here way
and you can have it the male way.

I get castigated all the time for not putting it on the right way.