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View Full Version : Career Bank Robbers - it's what they do.


Sir George Cayley
7th May 2014, 21:17
Allegedly.

BBC News - Fugitive 'Skull Cracker' Michael Wheatley in custody (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-27315001)

I'm in the 'Life means Life' corner but would be interested to hear from someone who thinks otherwise.

SGC

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 21:20
Less said about the career nincompoops that let this guy into an open prison the better!

Caco

500N
7th May 2014, 21:23
Just another example of someone either on parole, out on day leave or given a cushy in a low security prison who escapes and then commits another crime.

Life means life - and i bet this guy doesn't get it !!!

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 21:27
He may be a self confessed career criminal but he is clearly not a very successful one having amassed only 45,000 during his long and at times very violent career (if we are to believe the press).

Caco

tony draper
7th May 2014, 21:34
Must tick off the Judges,at the end of the trial they pass a sentence that is utterly meaningless once the buggas get into the system,they may as well stand up remove their wigs stick their index finger to their lips and go bwwibble! bwibble! bwibble!
:uhoh:

PTT
7th May 2014, 21:39
People can rehabilitate: BBC News - US man freed after being sent to jail 13 years late (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-27285840)

A US man, who authorities forgot to send to prison for 13 years, has been released after 10 months behind bars.

Cornealious "Mike" Anderson was sentenced in 2000 for armed robbery but only sent to prison in July last year.

In that time he got married twice, had children and started several businesses.

He said he made no attempt to hide his identity from the authorities, and even reminded them about his sentence.

Anderson said he was "very happy" after being released on Monday.

"My faith has always been in God, I'm just so thankful, thank God for everything," he said after the verdict.

Judge Terry Lynn Brown praised Anderson's behaviour since his conviction, saying: "You've been a good father. You've been a good husband. You've been a good taxpaying citizen of the state of Missouri.

Tankertrashnav
7th May 2014, 22:14
It seems that Wheatley was given a minimum 8 year tariff when he was sentenced. He had already overrun that by four years at the time of his escape, so it's a reasonable bet he wasn't convincing the parole board that he was fit for release yet. That adds to the disbelief that he was both in an open prison and also being granted day/weekend release to prepare himself for life on the outside.

One advantage of the life sentence is that you are always serving it, even if you have been released, so there is no need to try him again - he can just revert to his life sentence, hopefully not in an open prison this time and with a possible parole date moved way into the future.

I'm not in favour of whole life tariffs for robbers. If a bank robber knows he is going to get a full life tariff if convicted he is far more likely to kill to evade capture - after all, what would he have to lose?

con-pilot
7th May 2014, 23:14
I know I've told this story here before, but seeing the title of the thread, I'll repeat it. A back in the Marshal days story.

One Monday morning I was ordered to take one of our small jets (a Sabre 80 for those that care) to a city on the East Coast. Usually when one of the Sabres were launched on a deadhead mission to pick up a prisoner, it was one of a few reasons. A extremely dangerous and violent prisoner, a known political prisoner, a famous by recent headlines and news stories prisoner, a famous, movie star/recording star prisoner, someone in WITSEC, drug lords, those sort of passengers.

Well this time it was none of the above. After we land and park, I see a G-car, two Deputy US Marshals and a little old man, about a hundred years old. Okay, he looked a hundred years old. They were standing by the G-car talking, next thing I noticed was that the old man, the prisoner, only had a pair of handcuffs on, loosely fastened. This was against about every rule we had concerning prisoner transportation. So I figured there had to be a hell of a story behind this.

Well, turns out there was a hell of a story. The prisoner had been in prison since his teens serving a life sentence for murder. For the last 40 years he had been a model prisoner and had really never been in any real trouble during all the time he had served. On his 80th birthday, he received a Presidential pardon (Clinton), the thinking being that he had served enough time and that he should be allowed to live the rest of his life a free man. So he had been released, sent to the city he had been convicted in and released.

He didn't last a month. He had no family, in the city he was released in he knew not a soul and modern technology was a mystery to him, in short he was an alien in a strange, nearly incomprehensible land. But he knew there were still banks.

So he robbed a bank. Now not in the traditional way, no screaming "GET DOWN, GET DOWN, THIS IS A ROBBERY!". No he calmly walked in, waited in line at a teller's window, when he got to the window he told the teller that he was robbing the bank and 'would she please give him 500 dollars'. She complied with his request, setting off the silent alarm while she did so. He thanked the teller, apologized very sincerely and walked out the front door of the bank.

Where he sat down on the sidewalk (pavement) to wait for the police. Of course the police arrived very quickly, place this guy under arrest and off he went to jail. He refused counsel and plead guilty at his trial. I was told it was the shortest trial for bank robbery in federal court in history.

Pleading guilty, he was of course given another trip to a federal prison. It turned out that he could not handle living outside of prison, it was the only life he had known for over 60 years. He didn't know how to live outside of prison, he was lonely and frighten.

But, there was a problem, seems there always is, doesn't it. Remember the Presidential pardon. Well that was the problem. Powers upon high, very, very high didn't like this guy going back to prison after he, err, a Presidential pardon was granted, it was an election year after all. So the midnight oils burned in Washington DC. What to do, what to do?

Finally someone came up with a solution, most likely by a White House janitor. The old man would be placed in "Special Prisoner" status. Minimal restrains, lose handcuffs in front, a ride to a 'white line' prison in his 'own private jet' and serve the rest of his life in a country club prison.

He thanked me for the flight and off he went to work on the golf course next to the 'white line' prison, if he wanted to that is.

And off we rode into the sunset, me very happy that I had gotten out of the office for the rest of the week.

For once 'they' dispatched one of the small jets out, they stay out for the rest of the week.

Private jet
7th May 2014, 23:25
Isn't physically robbing banks a somewhat outdated crime now? All the security ink bombs etc etc and there's not much cash held in bank branches to start with these days.

500N
7th May 2014, 23:37
They seem to go for Milk Bars, Convenience stores, betting places now or at least over here in Aus they do.

G-CPTN
8th May 2014, 00:07
He has gone on the run twice in the past and each time staged a series of violent robberies before he was caught and re-jailed.
Seems it's all he knows.

Sort of like an alcoholic falling off the wagon.

At least he will get fed and housed.

sitigeltfel
8th May 2014, 06:59
People can rehabilitate: BBC News - US man freed after being sent to jail 13 years late (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-27285840)

Anderson was 22 at the time of the robbery and had never been convicted of a serious crime before his 2000 sentence.Wheatley had 13 life sentences. Do you honestly think there was the slightest chance of rehabilitation?

Get real :ugh:

PTT
8th May 2014, 07:04
Is that what I said? No. Learn to read.

BDiONU
8th May 2014, 07:14
Just another example of someone either on parole, out on day leave or given a cushy in a low security prison who escapes and then commits another crime.The crimes he got 13 life sentences for were committed 3 weeks after release on parole from his previous 27 year sentence. Who decides on letting these idiots out?

tony draper
8th May 2014, 08:14
Shot whilst trying to escape used to solve a lot of these problems.:rolleyes:

PTT
8th May 2014, 09:15
Your inference is not my implication. Learn to tell the difference between my statements and your assumptions.

sitigeltfel
8th May 2014, 09:15
Is that what I said? No. Learn to read.

The only thing you said was "People can rehabilitate", the rest was copy and paste. I read, and fully understood what you were getting at.

Your post dealt with the rehabilitation of offenders in a thread that highlighted the attempt to reintroduce a dangerous and obviously unrepentant criminal back in to society.
You obviously believe, like I do, that some offenders can be let free after a period of time, but in this case a massive error was made, putting innocent members of the public at risk.
If you cannot see that then maybe it is you who requires a lesson in comprehension.

PTT
8th May 2014, 09:48
You obviously believe, like I do, that some offenders can be let free after a period of time, but in this case a massive error was made, putting innocent members of the public at risk. Where did I say otherwise? While this individual did not rehabilitate it is no reason to get rid of the possibility of rehabilitation for others.

Worrals in the wilds
8th May 2014, 11:50
He didn't last a month. He had no family, in the city he was released in he knew not a soul and modern technology was a mystery to him, in short he was an alien in a strange, nearly incomprehensible land. But he knew there were still banks.
Interesting story. Sounds like a dude who wanted to get back 'home'.

Flap 5
8th May 2014, 12:05
Career bank robber - It's what they do. It's certainly what this guy does. He walks out of an open prison and robs a bank. Having been in prison for robbing banks.

We talk about prison being about rehabilitation. The primary reason for prison is to protect the rest of society. This guy is a sociopathic bank robber. He just can't stop himself. Society needs protecting. Lock him up.

Blacksheep
8th May 2014, 13:28
so there is no need to try him again Yes there is. If he simply serves his 13 life sentences he will be out in just 17 years. If he's tried and convicted of the latest episode, the judge can give him a "whole life" tariff and he'll come out in a wooden box.

M.Mouse
8th May 2014, 14:44
Interesting story con-pilot but am I the only one who read it with a tinge of sadness that a teenager, who obviously committed a very serious crime, should have wasted his entire life in prison?

I am not a soft in the head liberal and do not know the full story of his crime and he may have well deserved all he got but looking at the mistakes we all make when young to have, in effect, forfeited his entire life for his crime strikes me as a (probable) waste of taxpayers money and that there was a possibility that he may have been able to be rehabilitated into a useful member of society many years previously.

500N
8th May 2014, 14:47
Mouse

I tend to agree and now I think you would have other options, especially if he was young.

Look at the time when he was convicted, it was arrest, trial, throw him in jail and that was that.

G-CPTN
8th May 2014, 14:52
Some people yearn to join the military, and as soon as they are old enough they join up and spend many years as part of an institution.

Prison is no different in many respects, as the inmates become part of the community and their friends are also prisoners, so they know no other way of life.

G-CPTN
8th May 2014, 19:47
Iwao Hakamada: Boxer on death row for 48 years proven innocent in Jana's Supreme Court after a DNA test | Metro News (http://metro.co.uk/2014/03/27/boxer-on-death-row-for-48-years-proven-innocent-after-a-dna-test-4681143/)