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probes
7th May 2014, 11:28
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/74636000/jpg/_74636363_olgakotelko2bbc.jpg


At 95 years old, Olga Kotelko could be forgiven for sitting on the sidelines as people 60 years her junior jump over poles and hurl javelins into the distance.
But this sprightly 5ft-tall Canadian joins in - in a big way.

Dr Carol Holland, director of Aston University's research centre for healthy ageing, says one of the most surprising findings in recent years is that time spent with friends has a huge impact on ageing well.
And nurturing friendships in mid-life may offer some protection against frailty in old age.
Dr Holland says: "More and more research on ageing shows the more friends you have when you are 50-60 years old, the less likely you are to be isolated in later life. And the less isolated you are, the less likely you are to be frail as the years go by. "
And one of England's largest studies on ageing found that people who were socially isolated were less likely to survive over a period of seven years than those with good social networks.

BBC News - The ageing game: Could we all be 95-year-old athletes? (http://www.bbc.com/news/health-27207219)

airship
7th May 2014, 20:09
Looking at the photo, I'm reassured that this old lady had a little "less far to fall" on the other side of the jump. At that age, I understand that one's bones are much more prone to fractures etc.

Back in the days when I was once quite "sporty", if not also spotty, I remember doing the "back-flip" at about 5ft 6in aged 12 or so regularly. And landing on the other side of the jump on my back after similarly falling 5ft 6in into a 6in deep pit simply dug-out out of the sandy soil. I much preferred the "long" or "hop, skip and" jumps. :ok:

One also played soccer as a "right-winger". I did not like to "head" the ball even though I scored a few goals that way, once even ending up in the local newspaper having scored the best goal of the match. I was always concerned that heading the ball might lead to serious damage in later life, uhmmm not really, I just didn't like doing it. But as you will confirm, airship is fine in that (head) area!

PS. The elder Nigerian woman also competing was wearing the "419" and not "319" as Olga did.

500N
7th May 2014, 20:12
Pretty impressive for 95 years old.


Re bones, don't bones become more brittle from non use in older life ?
So if you sit around doing nothing, they become thinner ?

vulcanised
7th May 2014, 20:50
Footballs for the heading of were a lot different 50yrs ago to what they are today.

Like lumps of concrete, with lethal laces they were.

500N
7th May 2014, 20:52
Agree. Heavy as as well, especially after being used on a typical dewey or wet pitch at school :rolleyes:

I was talking about heading the other day and current kids, they seem to have lost the ability to head or duck !!!

Fareastdriver
7th May 2014, 20:57
Thre's nothng like a leather football on a wet day.

Nowadays when a corner is taken you see the players dodging around to get a opputunity to head it in. Then, if the ball was wet, they were dodging around trying to get out of the way.

500N
7th May 2014, 20:59
Yes, the balls nowadays are a totally different kettle of fish.

I was strong legged as a kid and could seriously belt a soccer or rugby ball
a long distance but when they were wet, you really knew what was what.

con-pilot
7th May 2014, 21:11
Hell, some of my bones break just watching some of the hits football (US) players take today. :uhoh:

airship
10th May 2014, 18:37
500N and vulcanised who wrote: Footballs for the heading of were a lot different 50yrs ago to what they are today.

Like lumps of concrete, with lethal laces they were.

I'd completely forgotten about those "laced-up and leather-enveloped" (soccer) footballs with the rubber air-bladder (the end simply being folded-over and tied) so that there was always a very hard and evident side to the ball which could really "hurt"?! Thanks for refreshing my memory and reminding me why I probably never liked to "head the ball" back in those days... :ok:

How about this 102 year old French cyclist (http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/general/others/cycling-102yearold-frenchman-robert-marchand-beats-own-world-record-9101226.html) still breaking his admittedly own official records...?

racedo
10th May 2014, 19:12
More and more research on ageing shows the more friends you have when you are 50-60 years old, the less likely you are to be isolated in later life. And the less isolated you are, the less likely you are to be frail as the years go by. "
And one of England's largest studies on ageing found that people who were socially isolated were less likely to survive over a period of seven years than those with good social networks.

Mentioned this to SWMBO and she said she notices it.
She regularly attends morning mass during the week and sees pretty much the same core group of people, majority retired. They all know each other by name, stop and chat and see how each other is doing. Occasionally there is tea and coffee afterwards which most attend and chatter away for a couple of hours.
Someone doesn't come along for a day or two then people will check up on them to see if ok.

Quite a few people travel to see family or on breaks so always someone away and majority of people have kids living elsewhere in UK or abroad.