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Wingswinger
6th May 2014, 22:44
Continuing the Dylan Thomas centenary. If you haven't seen it yet, it's on the iPlayer. Categories>BBC Wales. It's only there for another 6 days. It's brilliant.

Tankertrashnav
6th May 2014, 22:57
There has been a lot of Dylan Thomas's poetry on Radio 3 in the last week, including many recordings of Thomas reading his own work.

Once again I was struck what a marvellous voice he had, and bizarrely, how "English" he sounded. I wonder if well-educated Welshmen of the period were encouraged to tone down the "Welshness" in their voices. Apparently his style is regarded as a bit stagey and theatrical for modern tastes, but at least he didnt put you to sleep in two minutes like some modern poets, like the present Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, who could bore for England, (or should I say Scotland!)

I've got the DVD of the Burton/O'Toole version of Under Milk Wood - is that the one that's on the iPlayer?

tony draper
6th May 2014, 23:01
Watched about ten minutes of it,will watch the rest later have to say much prefer the full radio version on youtube thus far.
:)
Hmmm,if you just want to listen to it in all its glory without the faffing about I have watched thus far on iplayer here is the link.
Plus of course Burtons voice.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuPO2Kvqlms&list=PLAC48B09B951F1B57&hd=1

Fox3WheresMyBanana
6th May 2014, 23:40
Thanks for the link tony; my parents only had about 20 LP's, but Under Milk Wood was one of them. I used to listen to it around midnight in the moonlight, sleeping on the living room couch when visiting aunts had my bed.
For those of you who would like to convert the YouTube .mp4 to .mp3 to listen to elsewhere, iTunes can do it (but Apple will deny it).
Use File-Add File to Library to drop the mp4's into the movie section
Highlight one, then hold the Shift key and select File-Create New Version. The .mp3 version will be available now (it isn't if you don't hold down Shift)
Repeat.
Afterwards, you will find the .mp3 versions in the Music section, probably under Unknown Album.

Fox3
one-time Apple iPod Technical Advisor

worth reminding people that Burton trained as an RAF navigator once upon a time. I was always conscious when dropping bombs at Pembrey that a bad miss could put a bomb in Dylan's old boathouse at Laugharne, and that one drink can kill you. I believe in his case it was the 20th -Depth Charges I read.

tony draper
7th May 2014, 00:02
To me the visuals are just a distraction, it needs them not,it should be listened to,Dylan's words are the wonder the pictures they paint should be seen in the minds eye.
IMHO.:rolleyes:

Worrals in the wilds
7th May 2014, 00:08
I saw a local theatrical version once that was very good. They did the first fifteen minutes of dialogue in complete darkness, very gradually brought the lights up over the next fifteen minutes then finished it as a full play. It's extremely difficult to hold an audience in the dark for more than a minute without them losing interest (or playing on their mobile phones :ugh:) but we all sat listening avidly.

Flying Lawyer
7th May 2014, 01:00
TTN Once again I was struck what a marvellous voice he had, and bizarrely, how "English" he sounded. I wonder if well-educated Welshmen of the period were encouraged to tone down the "Welshness" in their voices.

Dylan Thomas' father got a First in English at Aberystwyth University and later became senior English Master at Swansea Grammar School where he is remembered as having a deep and sonorous speaking voice. Although both parents spoke Welsh and had strong links to Welsh cultures and customs, they brought their children up speaking only English. This wasn't unusual in the Anglicised areas of South Wales. Dylan attributed his English accent to the elocution lessons to which both he and his sister were sent and attributed his pleasure in the sensual quality of language to his parents reading aloud to him from a very early age.


The Boathouse in the village of Laugharne, where Dylan Thomas lived and worked for the last four years of his life, is worth a visit.

http://www.dylanthomasboathouse.com/media/534/house-estuary.jpg

http://www.dylanthomasboathouse.com

Wingswinger
7th May 2014, 06:11
Apparently his manner of speech in his poetry readings and radio performances was not his normal voice. He adopted it to aid clarity.

Laugharne may be Llarregyb but it's a lovely spot.

TTN,

I've got the DVD of the Burton/O'Toole version of Under Milk Wood - is that the one that's on the iPlayer?

No, it's an updated remake with a who's who of Welsh performers taking the various parts. Tom Jones is Captain Cat, Bryn Terfel is Eli Jenkins, Sian Phillips Mrs Pugh, Charlotte Church Mrs Ogmore-Pritchard, Katherine Jenkins Polly Garter.

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-27051853

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 06:32
Laugharne may be Llarregyb but it's a lovely spot.

It is indeed and not too far from Barafundle Bay, my favourite beach in the world.

Thanks for the links. I can already hear Mr Cadwallader Davies dreaming... :ok:

Caco

Wingswinger
7th May 2014, 06:42
It is indeed and not too far from Barafundle Bay, my favourite beach in the world.

Ah, Pembrokeshire. Am I in heaven?

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 06:43
Am I in heaven?

It doesn't get much closer. :ok:

Caco

500N
7th May 2014, 06:48
Caco

"It is indeed and not too far from Barafundle Bay, my favourite beach in the world."


Just googled, that looks a superb beach and the photo above looks great as well.

Wingswinger
7th May 2014, 07:18
FL,

Although both parents spoke Welsh and had strong links to Welsh cultures and customs, they brought their children up speaking only English. This wasn't unusual in the Anglicised areas of South Wales.

Not just the anglicised areas. My wife (born 1949) was one. Her parents and grandparents were from families of farmers and master mariners living around St David's, Solva and Llawhaden. She is of the first generation of her family not to speak Welsh. Her father, a merchant navy officer, equated it with narrow-minded parochialism which he could not reconcile with his experiences at sea and around the world. He sailed in the Atlantic and Arctic convoys during WW2 and was torpedoed spending 12 days adrift before being rescued by the Nantucket Coast Guard. Welsh was his first language but he increasingly refused to speak it. I only ever heard the occasional word of it from him. His voice had that deep sonorous quality you refer to and, my wife says, his brother's voice was even more so. She thinks he was a voice double for Burton. I've often asked her if she feels a loss through not speaking Welsh but she says not. I think it's a pity. The interesting thing is that our daughter (Welsh/Scottish parents but educated in England) feels a deep cultural attachment and has been learning Welsh.

Ant T
7th May 2014, 07:29
Think it was Llareggub, not Llarregyb, a play on words read backwards.........

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 07:31
The standard of education in many Welsh speaking schools is high.

If I had had kids while living in Wales I would have had no hesitation in sending them to such and ensuring that they spoke Welsh (along with as many other languages as they could have mustered)...

Of course which dialect of Welsh is another thing altogether and is likely to start minor civil wars amongst those from the So0uth, West and North... ;)

Caco

Rather be Gardening
7th May 2014, 07:56
Absolutely magical place. I'm fortunate enough to live very close - used to walk the dog there often, and many times we had the whole place to ourselves.

http://www.exmod.co.uk/images/beach_barafundle_bay.jpg

http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/8a/03/fe/8a03fea28e393d34fa582c5266d0b618.jpg

Wingswinger
7th May 2014, 08:03
Ant,

Think it was Llareggub, not Llarregyb, a play on words read backwards.........

Yes, but Y in Welsh is pronounced U. Thomas originally wrote Llarrgyb I believe but I stand to be corrected.

Tankertrashnav
7th May 2014, 10:15
Flying Lawyer and Wingswinger - thanks for the info!

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 10:31
I am from Swansea, but not 'posh.'

Port Talbot, now there's posh! ;)

Many moons ago I was staying with some friends in Kidwelly and we repaired to the pub one evening whereupon two of the local lads, perceiving I wasn't a local asked me in none too friendly a way where I was from.

"I am from Cape Town I said "whereupon they looked quizzical and said "that's near Port Talbot isn't". "Just a little south from there" I replied...

Caco

Flying Lawyer
7th May 2014, 20:15
Port Talbot, now there's posh!
That's the first time I've heard Port Talbot called posh.


Ah, Pembrokeshire. Am I in heaven?

Very close.
It's not my home county but, I have to concede, it is heavenly - and still largely unspoilt.

We rented a delightful cottage last year on the banks of the upper reaches of the Cleddau estuary in the Coastal National Park - an area of outstanding natural beauty. After about ten or so minutes drive off the beaten track, ignoring the 'No Through Road' signs, the estuary comes into view and, shortly after, the cottage - a tranquil haven for sailing, birdwatching, walking, bike-riding, exploring Pembrokeshire or just relaxing and admiring the panoramic views across the wide tidal estuary and its wildlife, including heron and kingfishers.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v140/Rotorheads/74.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v140/Rotorheads/5c6aac8f-993e-4b41-9948-e93ab7f7dc87.jpg

No wonder this part of the estuary, away from the tourist areas and the busy ports downstream, is known as the 'Secret Waterway'.

Pembrokeshire's famous sandy beaches and other highlights aren't far away but we found ourselves spending more time than we expected just lazily meandering through the tiny villages and historic castles along the estuary.

When we went further afield, coming home to watch glorious sunsets across the estuary from 'our' cottage - in total silence except for the wildlife - was just perfect.

Heavenly indeed!



(Edit)

If anyone is interested I'd be happy to provide details of the cottage.
We've already booked our week for this year! ;)

Windy Militant
7th May 2014, 20:18
Ah Portalbot apparently the inspiration for Blade runner and Terry Gilliams Brazil! Or as one welsh comedian put it Portalbot It's like Blade runner with Burbery!

Now Talacharn to give it its proper name, is indeed a fine place, my niece got married there last year and as a young hooligan I used to take part in the exhibition grass track races which were held to raise funds for the rugby club.
Most of the money came from the prize giving after the racing where large amounts of beer and hot dogs were sold to the spectators in the rugby club, however competitors marshals and officials got free beer all night. It was brought round in large enamel jugs for us. :}

St Petrox and Pentlepoir now there's posh!;)

Cacophonix
7th May 2014, 21:15
Ah Portalbot apparently the inspiration for Blade runner

If I remember correctly a number of scenes from a recent Dr Who series were shot at Margam Park the rather more beautiful area near Port Talbot than the iron and steel works...

Port Talbot was always good to look at from the air but I am not sure I am tough enough to meet the reality on the ground. ;)

Caco

Wingswinger
8th May 2014, 08:35
FL,

If you don't already know of it here's a place to have a very pleasant alfresco lunch when you're there.

http://www.quaysidelawrenny.co.uk

Years ago I used to be a member of a small angling syndicate on the Eastern Cleddau, upstream of Canaston bridge to St Kenox Farm. It had a good run of sewin (sea trout for those not in the know) in those days and the months of July to September would see me bleary-eyed in the mornings having been out on the river night fly-fishing until midnight or later three or four nights a week. How I flew the next day I don't know but I did! My most memorable night was when a fish which took my fly turned out to be a 12 lb salmon, not the more usual 2-3 lb sewin! The salmon run on the Cleddau was small; they were sewin rivers mostly. Anyway, a 12 lb salmon on a trout fly, in the dark, on a river treed-in and no more than 25 yards wide where I was fishing? I had to get in and out of the river as I followed that fish in its bid to return to sea. In so doing I caught my wader boot on a stray strand of barbed wire and got a bootful when I stepped back into the water to land the fish. Worth it though, well worth it. Great sport. The fish was delicious unlike the pale, bland, tasteless farmed stuff which passes for salmon these days.

When I was posted away from Pembrokeshire I gave up my membership because I didn't think I'd get back often enough to justify the outlay. Daftest thing I've ever done. I wonder how it fishes these days?

Wingswinger
9th May 2014, 06:28
Ah yes, Scruff, the old rogue. I heard he had some misfortune some years ago.