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Cacophonix
2nd May 2014, 16:10
Now I know we shouldn't judge people by their accents but let's be honest, some are better than others.

I am proud and delighted to have a South African accent which of course (as everybody knows) is a charming, intelligent, nay, sexy one...

Lee Mack - South African Accent - YouTube

What accent do you have, is it a miserable whiny Brummie one like Nigel Mansell's or do you sound like the chap that did the voice over for Shere Khan in the Disney film version of the Jungle Book (good if you work as a Senior Captain for a British airline for example)?

Don't be shy because whereever you come from there's bound to be someone with a worse accent than you...! ;)

Caco

ian16th
2nd May 2014, 16:16
Accent? Accent?

As i keep telling all these blerry Seth Effricans, I don't have an accent!

I speak English.:ok:

Cacophonix
2nd May 2014, 16:27
I speak English!

Ah Ian that sounds like an Afrikaans friend of mine who was mortally offended by the following sketch... her point was they they are all speaking English and therefore are not Afrikaners...

Actually the sketch is a true calumny because most Afrikaans cabin crew I have met have been charming in any language but must admit I did laugh at this anyway... (despite the dodgy Afrikaans accents)...:ok:

Air Afrikaans funny airline video worst airline in the world - YouTube

Caco

rgbrock1
2nd May 2014, 16:35
Caco:

South Africa? Is that part of Canada? Or is it in New Hampshire? :E

Having been born and raised in NYC I certainly had a very strong NYC accent. Things like cawfee, for coffee, or yawk for New York.

However, I spent many moons living in different areas of the United States and also in Europe. I found out that my NYC accent didn't always make me understandable to others so I worked on dissolving myself of that seeming affliction.

To date, everyone I meet has a hard time placing me due to my lack of any accent whatsoever. :ok:

Crabman
2nd May 2014, 16:41
I don't have any accent. Many other people do, however.

Cacophonix
2nd May 2014, 16:46
To date, everyone I meet has a hard time placing me due to my lack of any accent whatsoever. :ok:

Ah like some of those refined American stars of the 1950s movies (think Orson Welles)... or even Higgins from the TV series Magnum P.I. from the 70s. ;)

I mean listen to this guy (he is from Texas for goodness sake)...

Domineering woman vs Higgins - Magnum P.I. - YouTube

Caco

SMT Member
2nd May 2014, 16:54
To me the most gruesome to the ears is the English accent, where they draw out the last syllable of a sentence. 'Please come and see me at the officeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee', 'We welcome you onboard this flight to Londonnnnnnnnnnnn'. :yuk:

I have a Copenhagen accent, or rather an Amager accent, to be precise. It's not very pretty, but then again the language in itself is a bit of throat disease.

Tankertrashnav
2nd May 2014, 17:11
... the chap that did the voice over for Shere Khan in the Disney film version of the Jungle Book (good if you work as a Senior Captain for a British airline for example)?


That would be George Sanders who carved out a good career playing smoothies. The excellent Roger Allam who plays the first officer who is really the captain in Radio 4's Cabin Pressure has a very similar voice.

Favourite accent - has to be Norfolk - least favourite a toss-up between Brummie and Scouse!

Capetonian
2nd May 2014, 17:19
Brum has to be the worst UK accent, apart from being ugly it makes the speaker sound stupid. I've had four days there this week to confirm my sentiments. Favourite UK accent, Narn Irish by far, although there are variants which are less attractive than others.

As for foreigners speaking English, I loathe the French accent specially when spoken by whining women in a silly nasal 'little girl' voice that they think is sexy. Best, Polish, I think.

LGW Vulture
2nd May 2014, 17:20
Spitting Image-Never met a nice South African - YouTube

rgbrock1
2nd May 2014, 17:29
My ex comes from the area of Liverpool. The Wirral to be precise. I always thought her accent, as well as the same accent of her friends and family of that area, rather grating. I'm not one able to discern the different nuances in English accents but that one always seemed to grate on my nerves. I believe that's a Scouse accent?

Lightning Mate
2nd May 2014, 17:39
One should be aware that a real Englishman does not have an accent.

sitigeltfel
2nd May 2014, 17:49
One should be aware that a real Englishman does not have an accent.
"It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him."
GBS.

sitigeltfel
2nd May 2014, 17:52
Favourite UK accent, Narn Irish by far, although there are variants which are less attractive than others.

I know what you are getting at

IaadphJyy50

Capetonian
2nd May 2014, 17:54
When I was working in Houston TX I one of the bimbos in my group asked me if I could 'do her a favour'. I was hoping it wasn't going to be what those of us with dirty minds might imagine as she was about three times my size. She was from some hick town in Georgia (US, not Tbilisi) and one of the other US American girls said even they had difficulty understanding her.

When I asked what she meant, she said : "See, y'all got a real strong accent and we can't understand you .......... could y'all try and speak REAL ENGLISH like we do ..........!"

Mac the Knife
2nd May 2014, 18:00
Whatever Lee Mack sounds like it isn't South African - Monegasque perhaps?

I've never heard a good imitation of the various Afrikaans accents (of which to my mind the funniest is the Pretoria sound) by a non-Afrikaans speaker. My brother tries (and thinks he's very good) but in fact sounds more like the Muppets Swedish Chef.

But there's nothing to beat Salt River, Ravensmead or Manenberg - along with a whiff of pickled fish...

Mac

:p

SMT Member
2nd May 2014, 18:27
Oh, just thought of another one that really grinds my gears: German, as spoken in the Eastern (former DDR) part of the country. It's harsh, has no rhythm and is just plain ugly. Comes into its own, so to speak, when uttered by a 'person of authority'.

On the other hand, I really like the Austrian version of German. Not that of Vienna, mind, it's snobbish, rather that spoken in the Tirolean part of the country.

English-English is not, in my opinion, a very pretty language these days.

seacue
2nd May 2014, 18:31
To my mind, the "generic" American accent is easy to understand and does not place the speaker in any particular region of the country. Curiously, a few years ago many the main presenters on the US evening TV network news had a toned-down Ontario accent.

The Nu Yawk accent is best forgotten.

One of my co-workers was from North Florida and went to graduate school at the Univ of Miami (Fla). Educated Miami speaks with a northern / generic accent. He HAD to rapidly lose his regional "Southern" accent to avoid ridicule. He said that after three days back at his north-Florida home, the Southern accent was returning.

500N
2nd May 2014, 18:35
Caco
I just logged on and was speed reading your post when I came across this

" is it a miserable whiny Brummie one like Nigel Mansell's"

and did a double take :rolleyes:, thinking how does he know my accent and name :O

Although the Brummie accent has kind of gone now although some pick it up.


Had a GF who had an awesome Irish accent that used to be stronger when
she was with her parents :ok:

Fox3WheresMyBanana
2nd May 2014, 18:44
Worst: Essex girl - far whinier than the Brummie accent, and at least whilst Brummies sound dumb they also sound sincere.

The best accent is a foreign one.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6QUFqiJx9k

My relatively polished English accent, with a hint of Australian, seems very popular over here.

500N
2nd May 2014, 18:50
Fox3

" My relatively polished English accent, with a hint of Australian, seems very popular over here."


Likewise over here in Aus. The women loved it ;)

brickhistory
2nd May 2014, 18:51
As a son of Georgia (US, not Tbilisi), I lost my Southern accent (which worked pretty well to charm non-Southern ladies) after entering the military and having to use the new-fangled radio.

The accent reappears when re-immersed in the area. One's sister, one's first wife, and one's cousins all sound as though fresh from the remake of "Gone With The Wind." That seems to work a treat to non-Southern men.

I wonder if there are 'hick towns' complete with 'bimbos' in some green and pleasant land?

No doubt "Little Britain" isn't representative...

As to my favorites, a lady with a West End accent or one with an Australian lilt is enchanting. As for guys, they all become ersatz Piers Morgan to me...

Perhaps we like that which is unfamiliar yet not totally foreign?

Fox3WheresMyBanana
2nd May 2014, 19:02
A classic

How to seduce a woman - YouTube

Matari
2nd May 2014, 19:56
Americans tend to spot an Englishman about 50 IQ points just on the basis of his very exotic accent. Bless his heart.

tony draper
2nd May 2014, 20:23
Just finished listening to Bryson's book on the English Language,the NY accent is mutated cockney,fascinated read or listen.
Here it be for them as cant read.:rolleyes:
Journeys in English - by Bill Bryson - Unabridged Audiobook [ FULL ] - YouTube

redsnail
2nd May 2014, 20:43
I have a strong Sydney Australian accent. :suspect:
When I first moved to the UK, a fellow student said to me "oh I wish I had an accent." My reply "You do." :ok:

brickhistory
2nd May 2014, 20:55
What are the regional differences for Australian accents?

I am vaguely familiar with some of the UK - Yorkshire, Essex, etc, but not with those of Australia.

Illuminate please?

603DX
2nd May 2014, 21:06
Comment on this would be superfluous ... (except that the Aussie that I know best is called ........ yes, you've guessed it ....... Bruce!)

_f_p0CgPeyA

con-pilot
2nd May 2014, 21:06
When I moved to England from Austin, Texas, where I had lived for two years, the longest I had ever lived in one spot up to that time, I had a slight Texas accent.

But after living in England for six year, five off base and going to English schools then an American school for two years, I had more of a English accent at age 15 when I moved back to the United States. However, even after six years living in England, there were places in England that I didn't have a clue what they were saying.

Then I moved to Oklahoma and didn't have a clue what they were saying there either.

Yet all of it was supposedly in English.

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd May 2014, 21:08
...to my mind the funniest is the Pretoria sound...


Wat jy waar kry, rooinek...?:}



Despite being a native, one has been accused at times of being Australian, British or German by other natives of the city.

TWT
2nd May 2014, 21:08
There isn't much difference in Oz accents from coast to coast,but Sydney male accents are more nasally than say,Adelaide ones, where there was more of a slight English (UK) flavour.

Fantome
2nd May 2014, 21:12
the spoof and the guts of this is in the first six minutes, as Philip Adams reads
a draft submission for a preamble to the Australian Constitution at the time
in the late nineties that the nation was warming up to vote on whether to ditch the
monarchy and go for a republic instead. Sadly, the monarchists prevailed.

http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2007/06/lnl_20070622_2200.mp3


It does grate to hear your average Jetstar ('Death star') hostie come out
with eggs-it for exit. And depart-cha.

We had a GG, (Governor General) RG Casey . . (a keen airman BTW, also his wife) . ..
who became Lord Casey. Upon appointment to the highest
vice-regal office, he made a speech that received a wide airing
in which he bemoaned the decline in clear speech and other
bastardisations of the language. He called for greater care in homes and schools
so that, while preserving the essential idioms, we did not decline into
a nation of incoherent sloppy ungrammatical mumblers.

A few years ago there was a thread on here about accents from Annie Atcos and
other ATC women with pleasant intonations. One such had in particular
the unconscious knack of giving the blokes who needed to speak with her
the hots. She sat at a radar consol somewhere in Europe, as I recall.

Tony Greig was once mercilessly satirised for his accent, based on an imagined
exchange between him and Richie Benaud, while commentating the cricket.

RB - Ah c'mon Tony . .. . We're sick to death of hearing you
go on and on with this grudge of yours all the time

TG - Grudge Richie? . .. Grudge? . . . .. Yew listen to me . . . .
a grudge is where I pork my corr

BenThere
2nd May 2014, 21:15
I have Australian in-laws and I can't understand a word they say, though spoken in their version of English, until I've had a week or two to acclimate.

Aussies use so much slang and jargon it's almost like being in a foreign country.

I've found, though, that when I talk to them in a Southern US drawl, which I can affect as I've spent a good deal of time there, I get their attention and an eager ear just because they like to listen to the accent.

rgbrock1
2nd May 2014, 21:18
The one accent which always grates on my nerves every time I hear it is the accent spoken by citizens of the Indian subcontinent when speaking English. It's like nails on a chalkboard to me.

ian16th
2nd May 2014, 21:20
Aussies use so much slang and jargon it's almost like being in a foreign country.Errr, surely to an American, Oztralia IS a foreign country?

con-pilot
2nd May 2014, 21:26
Errr, surely to an American, Oztralia IS a foreign country?

Oh yeah, you bet. :rolleyes:

BenThere
2nd May 2014, 21:32
surely to an American, Oztralia IS a foreign country?

Not to them, it ain't.

500N
2nd May 2014, 21:39
"The one accent which always grates on my nerves every time I hear it is the accent spoken by citizens of the Indian subcontinent when speaking English. It's like nails on a chalkboard to me."


I had one on the phone for an hour yesterday, it grated, plus the fact
that he was trying to solve a problem that I don't think he quite grasped
and which turned out was being caused by something totally different to
how he was trying to solve it.

TWT
2nd May 2014, 21:57
Ah yes Fantome,PA announcements at Oz airports make me cringe.'Depar-cha'
indeed.

500N
2nd May 2014, 22:26
Sometimes the Kiwi accent or method of speech gets me with the raised ending and "hey" at the end as though everything is a question.

vulcanised
2nd May 2014, 22:36
And then there's Robert Peston..

Lancair70
3rd May 2014, 00:28
As a born and bred Aussie, I have very little accent and am often asked by other aussies where I was from originally ? ?

After living and working in the UK and Europe in the early 90's for 12 months, I returned home on a BA flight to Brisbane via Sydney. On the flight from Syd to Bne about 50 Australian female travel agents joined the flight. I was cringing at the accent, I wanted to go back to the UK. LOL

stevef
3rd May 2014, 00:42
On the other hand, listen to BBC Weather's delightful Carol Kirkwood. (https://www.google.co.uk/url?q=http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DKxiWPmLc-EM&sa=U&ei=CyxkU7q5KIemO7nLgcgD&ved=0CFAQtwIwCg&usg=AFQjCNHIU_JF7sXNNjmOeQd8DFSxuR3srQ)
I could watch and listen to her all day. :)

Hydromet
3rd May 2014, 00:46
There was a particular woman to whom I spoke on the phone every morning, although I had never met her. She had a delightful English accent, but I don't remember where she was from. I finally met her over Christmas drinks, and she was quite different in appearance to what I had imagined - not slim and petite at all - but a delightful person.

Our neighbours in PNG were locals from different parts of PNG. Each spoke 3 languages and he spoke English with a strong accent, but Pidgin and Motu were their only common languages. Their children spoke all their parents' languages, and spoke English with a plummy English accent.

Ogre
3rd May 2014, 01:45
I must admit I don't have a problem with the Aussie accent, I've got used to most regional UK accents, and for most of the countries where English is not the first language I can get by after a few minutes of readjustment.

But sitting in a business meeting with a colleague from darkest Lancashire is very frustrating, because trying to listen to a highly technical description of a problem just sounds like they are describing how to make black pudding......

Raine Emerson
3rd May 2014, 02:48
I don't think there is a worst accent but I love hearing people converse in English or Australian accent. Very 007 :D

FullOppositeRudder
3rd May 2014, 04:07
Our very good friends across the ditch (ie the Kiwis) are doing some very imaginative things with the English language and now have a quite distinctive accent which, once one is attuned to it, will "out" them in any conversation after only a minute or two.

We go there quite often and it's becoming ever more universal and entrenched over the 40+ years since we started.

The Australian accent does vary, more between social groups perhaps than by location. Often it the choice of words for certain objects which give a clue as to their origins - ports/cases, films/fillums.

I'm flexible, most of the time I use the Adelaide somewhat cultured accent and speech pattern. However I do catch myself mimicking the accent of the person I am speaking with, most especially on air in my Amateur Radio activities. SHMBO has been known to walk past the shack door and comment "He's the German (or American / Englishman) - not you!".

I find all accents fascinating and enjoy talking with people wherever they are from and however they say it. There is no best or worst which I can identify.

Seeyerlateron,

FOR

ruddman
3rd May 2014, 05:02
I'm flexible, most of the time I use the Adelaide somewhat cultured accent and speech pattern.

Adelaide has culture? :eek:

Ok....:D

parabellum
3rd May 2014, 05:58
Adelaide - A cemetery with lights!


The nicest USA accent I have heard, to date, is the North Western one from around Seattle, had six weeks of it. (Sounds good on the pillow too! ;)).


Not sure about Alaska as so many people there seem to have moved in from elsewhere in the USA but always enjoyed my Anchorage trips, all nice people.

mikedreamer787
3rd May 2014, 06:35
What is hell to my ears is the last 2 generations of
Aussies making a statement ending with that bloody
annoying question-like inflection? Maybe they're not
feeling quite secure in what they're saying?

I can't talk to these people for long? I'd rather listen
to some raving Indian carrying on about how I done
something wrong with my config settings? At least
when he makes a statement it sounds like one?

Worrals in the wilds
3rd May 2014, 07:11
What is hell to my ears is the last 2 generations of Aussies making a statement ending with that bloody annoying question-like inflection?I blame the Australian soapies such as Neigbours. Most of the young female characters use the upward cadence pattern, and as a result it's become very common. :( I don't remember it being around much before the 1990s.

There are regional variations between Australian accents, but they're hard to pick. I agree with TWT that the choice of words and use of slang is a more reliable measure, and even that's not 100% reliable.

mikedreamer787
3rd May 2014, 07:17
Thanks Worrals. Now I know who to hate for starting it.

I first noticed the questionising statements inflections
creeping in during the early 80s myself.

BTW those in FNQ can be easily identified hey, just as
Northern Terrestrials have big mobs of accent too.

Capetonian
3rd May 2014, 07:21
An accent that really grates on me, although it's more an affectation than an accent, is that awful fake 'Jamaican' type accent that many young people in the London area have adopted, it sounds so utterly stupid specially when used by blonde haired blue eyed kids from Hampstead and Weybridge. Someone should have taken 'Ali G'/Sacha Baron Cohen and stood him against a wall when he started that bloody awful trend.

ian16th
3rd May 2014, 08:54
Surely one of the worst Oz accents is that Welsh bird they had as Prime Minister for a while.

Mind you she did make a stand for us Brit Ex-pat pensioners when she visited Dave.

Achieved nowt though :sad:

AtomKraft
3rd May 2014, 18:29
I'm with Caco on this one. The SA accent, particularly from a lady is quite lovely.
Even the yarpies sound Oh- kiy to me....

500N
3rd May 2014, 18:31
" Surely one of the worst Oz accents is that Welsh bird they had as Prime Minister for a while."


Julia Gillard.

Was my local MP for years.

Nasal voice, then had speech coaching !

Lightning Mate
3rd May 2014, 18:43
That would have been very unpleasant for the coach since she talked out of the other end of her body.

IFMU
3rd May 2014, 20:09
I see several folks have no accent. Had no idea there were so many Connecticut natives here. I didn't have one either, till I had a concussion at age 11. Now people ask if I am from Canada.
Bryan

BenThere
3rd May 2014, 20:31
I find it odd that my Aussie in-laws and other Adelaide and Queensland locals understand me perfectly. I just have trouble understanding them.

I speak English with a California/Midwest flatness that enunciates the language in the mode you will find common with national broadcasters. I have no Southern drawl, Northeastern clip, or any other manifestation of regionality.

I just got back from a 10 day vacation in Ireland. Same thing. They all understood me, but I had to focus and concentrate so as to discern what they were saying.

con-pilot
3rd May 2014, 21:10
I speak English with a California/Midwest flatness that enunciates the language in the mode you will find common with national broadcasters. I have no Southern drawl, Northeastern clip, or any other manifestation of regionality.

I just got back from a 10 day vacation in Ireland. Same thing. They all understood me, but I had to focus and concentrate so as to discern what they were saying.

I'd say I have the same accent, less the Californian, at least from what people have told me that don't live in Oklahoma. But then again, some people around here have trouble understanding me because they claim I speak too fast like a Yankee. So go figure.

While I've lost nearly all of my English accent, I still on occasion use English phrasing and have to watch myself on spelling, such as spelling words like harbor, harbour, humor, humour, etc.

As for Ireland, same with us when we were there. The Irish had no trouble understanding us, but on occasion we did have problems understanding them.

I think this is due to US television shows that are shown in Ireland. Could be wrong about that. :p

B Fraser
3rd May 2014, 22:59
The last time I checked into an Aussie hotel, I was pointed towards the "egg nishna". I was totally baffled until it was explained that if the room was too hot, I could turn on the egg nishna.


At work, I was given a team of Brummie engineers who were all from the Black Country or "Black Controi" as it is pronounced. I was asked if I wanted a "kipper tie". I was again totally baffled until I was offered a "kipper coffee" instead.

TWT
3rd May 2014, 23:27
I find it odd that my Aussie in-laws and other Adelaide and Queensland locals understand me perfectlyIt's the TV.Most shows are US sourced.I've seen documentaries that have been shown on US TV and they have subtitle captions when the Aussies (truck drivers,farmers) speak.Good idea,I could barely understand them myself.

I once picked up a hitchhiking dairy farmer in Ireland.I gave him a lift to town and he pointed to a pub.We went in,he ordered 2 pints then I ordered 2 pints
and he walked out onto the road with his thumb out to go home.

I did not understand a single word he uttered in the 1 hour I was in his company.
kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
JJJ
b

ChrisVJ
4th May 2014, 07:32
When I was twenty I Hitched to Reggio Calabria. After a few weeks I got a job teaching English and shared an apartment with a guy called Michael who was from Australia. The first night we went for dinner at the local tavola calda and met a couple of his Italian friends. He explained that he studied accents and the way people talked.

"Chris here lives in North Nottinghamshire or South Yorkshire, within two or three miles of the border and he used to live in Oxford." At the time I had lived in Blyth for seven years and gone to school in Oxford for five.

What I couldn't believe was the Michael had never been nearer to England that Reggio Calabria!

We moved to Canada 1989 and after about five years I heard most neutral English people as East London. Strange effect of hearing so many Canadians. Seemed to have worn off now though.

bcgallacher
4th May 2014, 09:33
You dont know what an accent is until you have heard a Glaswegian! The Glaswegian accent/dialect ranks alongside Korean Engish as the most unintelligible.

B Fraser
4th May 2014, 10:15
The genius of Stanley Baxter....


Stanley Baxter - Parliamo Glasgow Sketches - YouTube

tony draper
4th May 2014, 10:28
Once doing some work in Vancouver,we had a meeting with the Shipping Superintendent afterward we were standing around yacking and I asked him how long ago he had left Tyneside,he was shocked,"how did you know I was originally from Tyneside"? you speak Canadian with a tiny wee tad of Geordie in there somewhere,buggah! he said I came out here over thirty years ago as a 12 year old.
:uhoh:

B Fraser
4th May 2014, 10:34
There's a saying that your accent is fixed the moment your bollocks drop. I think there's more than a grain of truth in that.

tony draper
4th May 2014, 10:52
Probably something that inserts itself into the hole in your brain pre prepared to except a language in the first ten years of life.
Mebbee accent also serves a Darwinian purpose,it shows you are a member of a particular group or tribe and therefore should not be killed the instant you walk into the village,though if I were the headman I would not advise you to walk into my village.
:E
Kill him!
But chief he speaks like us.
Very well he can join us for dinner
Kill him and cook him.

Capetonian
4th May 2014, 10:52
I was served in a cafe in Weybridge the other day by a waiter in his late forties. As he walked towards me, I knew he was South African, intuitively. He had the merest trace of an intonation that gave away his nationality of origin. He was amazed at the question and said he'd been in England since he was a small child (so presumably before his bollocks dropped although I didn't ask for that level of detail), but he was originally from Brakpan. No wonder he kept quiet about it!

I suppose you pick your accent up from your parents too.

Blues&twos
4th May 2014, 18:12
conversely, I have a friend who's Glaswegian parents have lived in SA for over forty years. They visited the UK last year to attend a wedding and not only was there no trace whatsoever of a SA accent, I'd have put money on them having just arrived from the heart of Glasgow.

I reckon that somewhere in SA there's a small town where all the locals have picked up a broad Scottish accent....

Fantome
4th May 2014, 18:36
In the mid-sixties a little book came out called LET STALK STRINE (let's talk Australian) . It was by Afferbeck Lauder (alphabetical order)


some corrupted phrases were -

gloria sarah titch (glorious heritage)

emma chisset? (how much is it?)

Air Fridge: A mean sum, or quantity; also: ordinary, not extreme. As in: The air fridge person; the air fridge man in the street.

Aorta (pronounced A-orta) is the vessel through which courses the life-blood of Strine public opinion. Aorta is a composite but non-existant Authority which is held responsible for practically everything unpleasant in the Strine way of life; for the punishment of criminals; for the weather; for the Bomb and the Pill; for all public transport; and for all the manifold irritating trivia of everyday living. Aorta comprises the Federal and State legislatures; local government councils; all public services; and even, it is now thought, Parents' and Citizens' Associations and the CSIRO.


much more of this here . . . . .. if you feel stroganoff -

http://www.textfiles.com/humor/strine.txt

con-pilot
4th May 2014, 18:41
Probably something that inserts itself into the hole in your brain pre prepared to except a language in the first ten years of life.

If that's right, no wonder I have such a strange, to some, accent. As by the age of ten, I had lived in Japan, Texas, Florida, Washington D.C., New Mexico and England*. :uhoh:

Oh, not in that order.


* Was living in England at age 10, moved back to the US, Oklahoma, at age 15.

tony draper
4th May 2014, 19:04
Keep trying Mr Con eventually some country will accept you.:rolleyes:

pineridge
4th May 2014, 19:17
I was privileged to know for many years a grand old man who was a farmer in Southern Alberta, Canada, who passed away at the age of 102.
He and his family emigrated from South Wales when he was 12 years old to homestead on the Prairies, eventually settling in Alberta.
Until his death he still spoke with a distinctive Welsh accent.

B Fraser
4th May 2014, 20:13
You keep your accent until you hear a better one.


Being a Scot, I won't be changing anytime soon.

Capetonian
4th May 2014, 20:24
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51oxcO7QpVL._.jpg

The author looks at the way in which a type of South African pronounces English words, has been an institution. The author writes about of himself as a Woozer who has lived, at various times, in Jonnsperk, Kaypdown and Pertouria, and he feels he has a reasonable acquaintance with STI (q.v.). After five years as an Arkie (q.v.), he taught in a Woozer school; also acting and directing, compiling school anthologies and generally distrupting people's lives. At one stage he thought he was experiencing the dilemma of his generation; nut now he's decided there's no real point in dropping-out anyway. And so, he believes that he may as well go on working 18 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year in some kind of self-imposed neo-Stalinist 25-year plan. No that he has retired, nothing has changed. He likes working with young people and he likes keeping his ears flapping, listening out for interesting pronunciations of South African English.

seacue
4th May 2014, 20:43
I have worked with or met many people in the USA whose original language was not English. My theory is that only those persons who learned English before the age of 12 spoke with essentially no "foreign" accent.

The one major exception was a Dutch chap who came to the USA to go to University. His accent was so purely American that few people realized he wasn't a native. He was a teen-ager in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation.

vulcanised
4th May 2014, 20:45
Not strictly an accent but the speech of a young lady presenter on a programme currently on iPlayer is most odd.

Stacey Dooley is a cute chirpy girl presenting a show on sex life in Prague. She has a nice voice but (for example) does not speak the letter 't' if it's contained within a word. Thus, the t in Britain is silent, as are both in 'batting', 'hitting', etc..

It's a most odd experience listening to her but she's nice to look at.

BenThere
4th May 2014, 21:04
Yes, the Dutch. I had a gig a few years ago as a 747 FO flying to and laying over in Amsterdam 2 or 3 times a month. The front desk staff at the hotel spoke absolutely perfect, accent-free English. It was easier for me to understand them than it ever was to understand the aforementioned native English speakers encountered elsewhere. In fact, I did better there than in New York, itself.

I'm reminded of the old Rod Stewart song referring to the girl with a Dutch accent. I always thought, "What accent"?

Solid Rust Twotter
4th May 2014, 21:19
Charlize Theron's faux North American accent makes my teeth itch.

brickhistory
4th May 2014, 23:50
If by "teeth itch" you mean 'schwing...!' then I believe the phrase translates into American 1980s English as well...

Davaar
4th May 2014, 23:57
Better, possibly, than an accent is an obscure language variant from the Indian sub-Continent or China. I cherish the memory of the elderly professor of one of these who was obviously ill-at-ease as the flight filled up. It was easy (except for the cabin crew, evidently) to see how the plot would unfold, and it did. All safely on boards and the doors sealed the dear soul made it clear in obscure language that she for one was sure as Hell not coming, and be damned in obscure language to the eager relatives awaiting her at London. Some hours later we all re-embarked and the baggage was reloaded and off we went.

Tankertrashnav
5th May 2014, 00:02
She has a nice voice but (for example) does not speak the letter 't' if it's contained within a word. Thus, the t in Britain is silent, as are both in 'batting', 'hitting', etc..




The famous glottal stop, surely, as epitomised in both cockney and geordie speech (agreed Mr Draper?)

Drives me bonkers. My Oxford educated daughter, who is neither cockney nor geordie and should know better, tells me she lives in somewhere called Nohingham :ugh:

reynoldsno1
5th May 2014, 00:35
I had always associated the glottal stop with the Thames Estuary environs & London, but it seems to have extended much farther North these days. As a former Dorset lad, it was non-existent in the SW of England.
I always think of myself as pretty well accent-less nowadays after a life of globe-trotting - however, apparently there are some phrases or words where I retain that 'burr' ... and I still ask people "Wazzon my cocker" as a greeting from time to time - probably a bit of a giveaway:ooh:

B Fraser
5th May 2014, 08:30
Stacey Dooley is a cute chirpy girl presenting a show on sex life in Prague. She has a nice voice but (for example) does not speak the letter 't' if it's contained within a word. Thus, the t in Britain is silent, as are both in 'batting', 'hitting', etc..

Now there's one presenter whose name will never be uttered in the same sentence as "intellectual". I have no idea what qualified her for the job of presenting. She must have an influential relative.

Back to the topic, Mrs F was raised in some obscure Canadian town called 'Trono. I have tried to find it on a map but to no avail. She also has problems pronouncing the word "ice". During the winter olympics, I asked what was on tv, she could only say "hockey" when the players were wearing ice skates. Try as I did, she could not be coaxed into saying "ice hockey".

Rather be Gardening
5th May 2014, 09:46
I've always liked the Geordie accent - could listen to it all day.

I think a lot depends on your experience of the speakers. I'd never really thought of the Wolverhampton accent as being particularly pleasant to listen to, then I had a two-year tour in that area. The people I met and worked with were lovely - friendly, kind and helpful. The accent is now on the 'like to listen to' list.

I have to agree with that rising intonation thingy though - sounds whiny and needy to me.

Capetonian
5th May 2014, 09:53
Charlize Theron's faux North American accent makes my teeth itch. If you meet her in person she sounds just like what she is, a chick from Brakpan! I sat next to her on a 'flart' once.

Tankertrashnav
5th May 2014, 10:06
I've always liked the Geordie accent - could listen to it all day.



So did I until they put that irritating git Matt Baker on Countryfile and basically made the programme unwatchable for me!

(Yes Mr Draper, I'm aware that the bloke comes from Co Durham, and that probably means he isnt a proper Geordie, but my Southern ear can't tell the difference and thinks you all sound the same!)

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 10:54
Charlize Theron's faux North American accent makes my teeth itch.


Amen to that... Arnold Schwarzenegger hasn't lost his accent after years of living and working in the US so I can't see why little Charlize, South Africa's very own divine koeksuster's accent should have become all US.

What is it about the USA that people who live there for just a few months come back with such weird accents? I appreciate that it is one of the abiding strengths of the American way that immigrants want to and seem to assimilate very quickly there, but please, 'losing' one's native accent on a six month working visit isn't credible and just looks like pretentiousness or fickleness at the very best.


Talking of faux American accents some of the American accents I have heard on Radio 4 plays etc. are so ludicrous that they are amusing...

Caco

tony draper
5th May 2014, 11:05
Cockney? great stuff,proper cockney that is not this modern mockney,here be a rendition, Forty Farsand Fevers on a Frushes Froat,not very broad cockney one admits.
:rolleyes:
Stan Greening and his Orchestra - Forty Thousand Frushes (1929) - YouTube
My Aunt Jenny married a Cockney so we were accustomed to the twang up here.

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 11:17
There's of couse, cockney and there's mockney...

This character's accent brings me out in hives...

Jamie Oliver - 30-Minute Meals - YouTube

Caco

tony draper
5th May 2014, 11:20
Think he speaks Essex,one can hardly blame him, that lot only evolved the power of speech a century or so ago.
:rolleyes:

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 11:23
Think he speaks Essex

I live in Essex Mr Draper and believe me he doesn't sound like any Essex man or woman I have heard (although he may want others to believe he does)... :ok:

I suspect he may have been brought up in a nice middle class area/pub in Essex where he adjusted his accent to suit his own particular version of what he believes is cool and 'right on' maybe but he just sounds silly, patronising and pretentious to the trained ear...

PS - his parents' pub "The Cricketers" in Clavering is well worth a visit not least because the food is excellent, the ales even better and you can stay overnight if you over imbibe...

Caco

Vercingetorix
5th May 2014, 11:44
Milanese Italian and Viennese German. Melodic and sweet to the ears.

And the worst gutteral Boer speak Africaans

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 11:50
Afrikaans doesn't have to be gutteral at all. There are many Afrikaans accents. Listen to the mellifulous sound of Jan Smuts' Malmesbury accent as he calls on South Africans to fight for Britain in the Second World War... :ok:

Field Marshal Jan Smuts - YouTube

Caco

CargoMatatu
5th May 2014, 12:27
Essex and/or "Estuary" English really gets my back up! :yuk::yuk::yuk::mad:

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 12:36
Essex and/or "Estuary" English

Can't say that I blame you...

I am a sucker for Welsh English accents even like the Cardiff and old Barry Docks accent!

Caco

500N
5th May 2014, 12:40
Cargo

Can you expand on what you mean by ""Estuary" English"

It's a long time since I've been in the UK.

Capetonian
5th May 2014, 12:49
Afrikaans doesn't have to be gutteral at all.
Pik Botha.
Kurt von Schirnding (who was Austrian by birth).

ian16th
5th May 2014, 13:38
a chick from Brakpan!

And here's me that she came from Benoni.

A knowledge of Sefrican helps to understand this next story.

I had family visiting from the UK. My cuz, born in Wigan, educated at Fettes and Cambridge, lived in Sarry for most of his adult life.

They night stopped in Bloemfontein, in the darkest Free State. Asking directions, they were advised to 'turn off at the Pecan Pie'!

After a while they discovered a corner on which there was a supermarket from the large SA chain called 'Pick & Pay'.:ok:

Capetonian
5th May 2014, 13:41
Benoni/Brakpan/Boksburg .......... pretty much the same, although Benoni has a better area down by the Lake, Farrarmere.

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 13:50
'turn off at the Pecan Pie'!

;)

My ex wife hails from Kimberley and when I was courting (such an old fashioned word that) during the days of calvinism and apartheid the town was galvanised by the news that a stripper named Glenda Kemp was going to appear in the lounge of a local hotel.

My ex's sister's boyfriend jumped to book tickets for this classy show and I thought I heard him on the phone asking what sort of snakes were available at the show. Now I knew that Ms Kemp used to include a python called Oupa as part of the show but thought that asking about the snakes was just a little OTT and even a bit perverse. Turns out he was asking what snacks were available. Happy daze... :ok:

GLENDA KEMP - YouTube

Caco

500N
5th May 2014, 14:02
Caco

A certain ex PPruner would not be impressed by her due to lack of assets ;) :O

Capetonian
5th May 2014, 14:06
I remember seeing Glenda Kemp, considered very risqué in those days, at a club in that bastion of Afrikanerdom, Pretoria. The show was rumoured to involve the insertion of a snake into somewhere where a snake would not normally venture (unless it was of the species known as a 'one eyed trouser snake'.)

Caco, as you well remember, in those days women did not have nipples. they had black strips or stars ........... unless the woman was black in which case they were allowed to let it all hang out.

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 14:09
A certain ex PPruner would not be impressed by her due to lack of assets ;) :O

Unlike Slasher, we took what ever we could get in those verkrampte old days.

Breasts were verboten and the closest you could get to them outside marriage was a quick peek in the old Scope magazine and even there nipples had black stripes painted over them (lovingly painted there by the censor).

So bad was the situation that the first time a girl saw fit to take off her blouse with me I assumed she was deformed because there weren't any stripes there... ;)

Reminds me a little of this song...

Bachman Turner Overdrive You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet Lyrics - YouTube


Caco

Damn - Capetonian beat me to it :-)

Capetonian
5th May 2014, 14:29
http://www.helenbrain.co.za/uploads/snakedancer2[1].jpghttp://myportelizabeth.co.za/wp-content/plugins/rss-poster/cache/69f44_Jacob_Zuma_Censorship.jpg

Scope used to have a 'centre fold' where everything was well concealed. There was usually a bit of blurb about the model : "Mandy is 23 and comes from Bellville, she likes horseriding, Chinese food, and meeting people."

There was a classic boob, pardon the phrase, where they obviously lifted the 'blurb' from a US magazine and it said something like : "This week's model is Tammy, she's 18 and comes from Louisiana, she's a dancer and a photographic model and specialises in open beaver shots'.

That got past the Publications Control Board because they had no idea what it meant!

500N
5th May 2014, 14:31
I remember the black stars covering things in UK magazines as well.

GearDown&Locked
5th May 2014, 14:51
Funny_Yorkshire_Airlines_comedy_Sketch_BestOfAirlines.wmv - YouTube (http://youtu.be/aLFlsMpssDs) :ok:

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 15:21
The Glenda Kemp memory inspired me to try and find out whatever happened to Ms Kemp...

And listen to this... (you couldn't make it up)...

Jacaranda FM Mobi site - Snake Dancer, Glenda Kemp (http://www.jacarandafm.com/post/snake-dancer-glenda-kemp/)

Caco

Fantome
5th May 2014, 15:51
the incomparable elocution of Professor Henry Higgins -



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhninL_G3Fg

Cacophonix
5th May 2014, 15:56
Ah the beautiful Audrey Hepburn...

"Cease this detestable boo-hoohing..."

Cor strike a light guv...

Wonderful stuff...

Caco

stevef
5th May 2014, 18:50
Scope used to have a 'centre fold' where everything was well concealed.

Remember it in 1995 when it was the closest thing to mens' magazines available in Gaborone. Then they went all evangelistic and put a stop to anything risque. That was the end of them. Cain't argue with testosterone...

Mechta
5th May 2014, 20:34
Cacophonix wrote: Talking of faux American accents some of the American accents I have heard on Radio 4 plays etc. are so ludicrous that they are amusing...Hear! Hear! Come to think of it, I have never heard a real American accent in a Radio 4 play. Its almost as if they do it to say, ' This ridiculous accent is to indicate to the listener that the person portrayed is an American, not that we happened to employ an American to play the part.'

The same now applies to Eastern Europeans.. The Radio 4 'Russian' accents particularly make me cringe.

Fantome
5th May 2014, 22:18
remember the banter of Milligan, Seccombe and Sellars when they used
to 'shamelessly ad lib'?

on occasion they'd remark on an accent put on . .. . . . 'desist from that execrable accent on the talking type wireless. . . . or 'you should be shot for that Glaswegian type talking.'