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SpringHeeledJack
2nd May 2014, 15:52
One has been reading about Doggerland, not a wonderland for those who like to frequent carparks at night :}, but rather a land mass in what is now the North Sea off the coast of Norfolk that has been flooded by the sea many thousands of years ago. Apparently habitable and had a thriving population as well. Anyone else know much about it and them ? Doggerland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doggerland)



SHJ

G-CPTN
2nd May 2014, 15:57
There used to be references to 'Doggerbank' as a language - which was probably just a dialect spoken by North Sea fishermen . . .:cool:

tony draper
2nd May 2014, 15:59
Yer I've read of it,there was a good Horizon? documentary about it a few years back also Time Team did a thing on it or leastwise tony thingy did,its landscapes hills and rivers have been mapped now.
Mind you I questioned the name Dogger, it should have been called Geordieland.
:rolleyes:
Here yer go.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4P9wQj6qX2I&hd=1

pigboat
2nd May 2014, 16:46
Apparently habitable and had a thriving population as well.

Obviously the first victims of global warming. :p

angels
2nd May 2014, 16:48
Seem to recall a documentary where a boffin went out into the North Sea and was pulling up mammoth tusks, old trees and the like just by lobbing a big net over the side and trawling the bottom, there's that much lying around.

"Mammoths sir. Farsands of 'em." :p

Fox3WheresMyBanana
2nd May 2014, 16:58
'The Origins of the British' by Stephen Oppenheimer is a good scholarly read on the peopling of the UK. Genetics seem to show the English have a different genetic origin than the Irish/Scots/Welsh. They migrated mainly from the Ukraine LGM refuge, via the then dry land of the southern North Sea (including Doggerland); whereas the others are mostly from the area of what is now the Basque Country, with some from Scandinavia.

tony draper
2nd May 2014, 17:07
Thing on Sky News I think it was this morning, the DNA tests are so good now they can trace your ancestors back to the very village they were living in a thousand years ago,they did it for the Weather Lass and had her kin living in a small village on a island in Scottyland.
Amazing stuff,the sooner they have all our DNA on a data bank the better it will get.
:E

Fox3WheresMyBanana
2nd May 2014, 17:12
Cheddar Man - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheddar_Man)

The oldest complete skeleton in the UK is 9,000 years old. His mitochondrial DNA was an exact match for two children living today in Cheddar, and one adult had only one mutation, out of only 20 sampled.

The highest concentration of any one phenotype was IIRC (and it will be no great surprise) in Norfolk.

tony draper
2nd May 2014, 17:21
What about the the Red Lady of Paviland at 33,000 years? though admittedly not a complete skeleton.
:)

Tankertrashnav
2nd May 2014, 17:32
not a wonderland for those who like to frequent carparks at night :},

Shame - another boring history thread then :(


;)

Fox3WheresMyBanana
2nd May 2014, 17:51
The Red Lady is the oldest known buried remains in the UK, consisting of roughly the left arm, left leg and a few ribs. Originally thought to be a Roman-era female, but now identified as a pre-last Ice Age male.

tony draper
2nd May 2014, 18:13
Best not mention Piltdown Man.:\

Fox3WheresMyBanana
2nd May 2014, 18:16
"You wouldn't let it lie!!" ;)

tony draper
2nd May 2014, 18:25
Oldest found thus far though they will be proto human is about half a million years old, just a tooth and section of long bone,forget the name now.
:)

Lon More
2nd May 2014, 19:57
I renember something about wooden plough shares brought up in fishing nets in the middle of the North Sea. In a thousand years will someone dredge up an old Ferguson on the Zummerzet Bank?

Hydromet
3rd May 2014, 01:03
Thing on Sky News I think it was this morning, the DNA tests are so good now they can trace your ancestors back to the very village they were living in a thousand years ago,they did it for the Weather Lass and had her kin living in a small village on a island in Scottyland.
Amazing stuff,the sooner they have all our DNA on a data bank the better it will get.Should be easy in some of those villages, with their diamond-shaped family trees.

Solar
3rd May 2014, 05:13
Does this mean that if it hadn't been for global warming we could have walked to mainland Europe?
There was me thinking it was a new thing caused by us making a cup of tea.
Does Al Gore know about this!!!!

parabellum
3rd May 2014, 06:08
I'm guessing the Dogger Bank is what is left of Doggerland? Many a seafarer has come to grief on said bank, used to feature in the shipping forecast,
"White, Dover, Thames, Dogger" and so on.

sitigeltfel
3rd May 2014, 06:40
There was a feature on it in the Mail yesterday

Tsunami 8,200 years ago wiped out tribes on British Atlantis say researchers | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2618640/Tsunami-8-200-years-ago-wiped-tribes-British-Atlantis-say-researchers.html)

tony draper
3rd May 2014, 07:15
One a wee coaster once running betwixt Rotterdam and Newcastle every week the Old Man was a keen fisherman if we had made good time getting away and the run down the coast and weather permitting we would heave too over the Dogger BanK and out would come the fishing tackle,I was surprised I could clearly see the bottom and fishies swimming hither and yon over it,studiously avoiding the Captains hook.:uhoh:
PS One was warned with much finger wagging never to mention this piscatorial pause as the owners would have a fit,a stationary ship is not earning.:rolleyes:

Wholigan
3rd May 2014, 08:26
Still features in the shipping forecast.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/marine/guide/shipping/key.html

Lon More
3rd May 2014, 09:14
It is likely that until relatively recent times the Isles of Scilly, with which Lyonesse is often associated, were much larger, many of them being joined into a single island named Ennor. Rising sea levels flooded the central plain around 400500 AD, forming the current islands. and the Goodwin Sands may have been an island called Lomea until a couple of hundred years BC

RedhillPhil
3rd May 2014, 10:44
I seem to remember reading that farsands of years ago when the water level was lower - or was it the land mass that was higher? Anyway, in those days the Thames was a tributary of the Rhine. Certainly at school in the sixties the geography teacher explained how mammoth tusks, deer bones and the like are brought up in north sea trawler nets on a regular basis.

tony draper
3rd May 2014, 10:47
I know summat even worse than that,the Tyne used to be tributary of the Wear,for Gods sake dont tell the Macums.:uhoh:

Fox3WheresMyBanana
3rd May 2014, 12:55
I seem to remember reading that farsands of years ago when the water level was lower - or was it the land mass that was higher?

The water level was much lower, and the landmass was slightly lower. The UK is still 'rebounding' from the weight of ice that was on it during the last Ice Age, though currently that's a 'rad and a tad' up on the west coast and a 'smidge' down on the east coast, because the ice was mainly west-side.
Or so our Geography teacher told us.

beaufort1
3rd May 2014, 13:19
I believe that is called an 'isostatic rebound'. :8