PDA

View Full Version : What's a Jiggle Test


lomapaseo
26th Apr 2014, 16:41
http://msn.foxsports.com/content/dam/fsdigital/fscom/nfl/images/2014/04/25/042514-NFL-Buffalo-Jills-cheerleaders-perform-during-a-stoppage-PI.vadapt.955.medium.35.jpg




Bills cheerleaders' rules | FOX Sports on MSN (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/bills-cheerleaders-rulebook-opinions-bad-mouthwash-good-042514)


A 12-page Buffalo Jills handbook has been released by the law firm representing five former Buffalo Bills cheerleaders who filed a civil action on Tuesday claiming subjection to illegal workplace rules.

The handbook is a series of do's and don'ts for the cheerleaders, including step-by-step guidance on everything from female hygiene to proper eating etiquette.

Here are some highlights of the rulebook.

*Remove make-up every night before going to bed!

*Never eat in uniform unless arrangements have been made in advance.

*When trying to "capture" a small piece of food onto a utensil, it is acceptable to use another utensil for aiding it aboard. Never use your fingers.

Try to brush your teeth or use a mouthwash before an appearance. Bad breath is offensive. Always keep it in check.

Jills must also avoid discussing religion, politics and other "strong opinions, " while wearing their three required eye shadow colors.

The lawsuit claims that defendants Stejon Productions and Citadel Communications implemented penalties including revocation of game tickets or dismissal from the squad if certain problems arose.

Infractions included posting pictures online in Jills attire, failing to pass "the jiggle test" -- a judgment on physique -- and "any conduct unbecoming of a Jill."

tony draper
26th Apr 2014, 16:52
When trying to "capture" a small piece of food onto a utensil, it is acceptable to use another utensil for aiding it aboard.:uhoh:

If Muricans would teach their sprogs the correct use of knife and fork this instruction would be unnecessary.:rolleyes:

SOPS
26th Apr 2014, 17:17
Yes they do seem to have a strange way to use a knife and fork.

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 17:20
Yes they do seem to have a strange way to use a knife and fork.

Can't be any stranger than holding the fork upside down. Makes as much sense as holding yer spoon upside down. :p

tony draper
26th Apr 2014, 17:31
I have a theory that the fork had not yet been invented when those pilgrim father blokes buggad off across the pond, thus they still ate with just knife and fingers,after their rebellion 1776 when we started talking to them again we agreed to send them some of these miraculous new inventions from England, the fork in exchange for some baccy,but still feeling a tad ticked off with them we omitted to send the instruction manual on how to operate the new kit ,and thus we have the present situation of the continuing complete lack of eating iron skills in the USA.
:rolleyes:

beaufort1
26th Apr 2014, 18:06
Can't be any stranger than holding the fork upside down. Makes as much sense as holding yer spoon upside down.

When you stab a morsel off your plate using a fork and convey it to your mouth you will notice that the fork 'upside down' as you call it, ergonomically slips into the mouth where the food can be held by your mouth without jabbing a tine into any soft tissue as the fork is withdrawn. The handle of the fork also fits comfortably into the palm of one's hand. ;):rolleyes:

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 18:12
I have a theory that the fork had not yet been invented when those pilgrim father blokes buggad off across the pond, thus they still ate with just knife and fingers,after their rebellion 1776 when we started talking to them again we agreed to send them some of these miraculous new inventions from England, the fork in exchange for some baccy,but still feeling a tad ticked off with them we omitted to send the instruction manual on how to operate the new kit ,and thus we have the present situation of the continuing complete lack of eating iron skills in the USA.

Sorry Mr. D, but I'm afraid that your theory holds less water than yer upsidedown fork. :p

Twas the Romans that invented the fork and after the fork finally make its appearence in Europe, after making its way all over Persia, it did so in Italy.

In fact, of all the countries in Europe that embraced the use of the fork, the UK was one of the last, if not the last. Change comes very slowly in England you know.

So the fork was actually in the Americas (Spain/Italy) before the English.

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 18:16
without jabbing a tine into any soft tissue

Oh, we solved that in America and 99% of the rest of the world by not being clumsy. :p

PTT
26th Apr 2014, 18:18
Oh, we sloved that in America and 99% of the rest of the world by not being clumsy.Irony check! :ok:

Lonewolf_50
26th Apr 2014, 18:19
English poem?

I eat my pease with honey
I've done it all my life
It makes my pease taste funny
But it keep them on my knife

Jiggle test is a valid test for one in that profession. Jiggle is part and parcel to their role and mission. :ok:

tony draper
26th Apr 2014, 18:22
Every Roman I ever seen in a movie ate with their fingers they also apparently ate lying down which is even dafter that holding a fork in yer right hand.
:rolleyes:

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 18:26
Irony check!

Err, no, typo check. :p

Fixed now anyway.

PTT
26th Apr 2014, 18:38
The irony was that in claiming to not be clumsy you were clumsy with your typing. I never believed that you guys didn't get irony - maybe I was wrong on that :ok:

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 18:43
The irony was that in claiming to not be clumsy you were clumsy with your spelling

Sigh, I was not clumsy in my spelling, I was clumsy in my typing.

Never the less, I understand your point.

But I still didn't stick my fork in the soft tissues within my mouth, while you may have very well stuck your foot in your mouth. :p

PTT
26th Apr 2014, 18:52
Fixed, and no foot used since I don't type with my feet. Maybe your doing so explains your typo, although you don't usually make typos so it's quite the talent if that's what you're doing... :}

Capot
26th Apr 2014, 18:56
Errr.....on a point of order;

The plural of pea is peas. Thus "I eat my peas with honey" usw.

Pease is a Middle English word referring to the vegetable now known as a pea. The word has survived in the name of the dish called "Pease Pudding", but nowhere else.

I know, it's boring, Sorry. We pedants can't help it.

Oh God, should that be 'us pedants'? No, it's the subject. No it's not, it's used adjectively. Isn't it? I'm off to shoot myself, I can't take the uncertainty.

stagger
26th Apr 2014, 19:00
What is a jiggle test?


According to the complaint...

....the Jills were subjected to weekly "physique evaluations" during which defendants' representatives tested the Jills' bodies for "jiggling." During the "Jiggle Test" defendants scrutinized the women's stomach, arms, legs, hips, and butt while she does jumping jacks. The physique evaluations largely determine whether or not any particular Jill would be allowed to perform at the Bills' next home game. Jills that failed to meet defendants' physical standards received warnings, and in some cases were penalized, suspended or dismissed.

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 19:31
although you don't usually make typos so it's quite the talent if that's what you're doing...

It was the big toe on my left foot that caused the typo, I type cross legged, and I've given it a good talking to I have. :=

Lonewolf_50
26th Apr 2014, 20:12
Capot, thanks, I had originally seen it spelled "peas" and had assumed (incorrectly) that "pease" was a common usage/spelling. Appreciate the update. :ok:

I am all for jiggle tests. Where do I sign up to test the jiggle of these Jills?

Lon More
26th Apr 2014, 20:18
http://likegif.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/jiggle-gif-1.gif

teeteringhead
26th Apr 2014, 20:21
The jiggle test is the dynamic equivalent of the uk 'pencil test'. Gosh henry - haven't heard that phrase for many a year!

I recall - with some nostalgic pleasure - a young lady (a well endowed one) of my erstwhile acquaintance who once said:

"Pencil Test?? I don't think I'd pass a Stick-of-Rock Test!" :E:ok:

G-CPTN
26th Apr 2014, 20:57
From the interweb:-
The fork did not become common in northern Europe until the 18th century and was not common in North America until the 19th century.

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 21:06
Slasher should be allowed to come and comment on this subject.

V2-OMG!
26th Apr 2014, 21:18
On or off the ground?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uBTEoGsIOg

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 21:27
The fork was introduced to Western Europe by Theophano Sklereina, the Byzantine wife of Holy Roman Emperor Otto II, who nonchalantly wielded one at an Imperial banquet in AD 972, astonishing her Western hosts.[9] By the 11th century, the table fork had become increasingly prevalent in the Italian peninsula. It gained a following in Italy before any other Western European region because of historical ties with Byzantium, and it continued to gain popularity due to the increased presence of early pasta in the Italian diet.[10] At first, pasta was consumed by using a long wooden spike, but this eventually evolved into three spikes because of how much easier it was to gather the noodles.[11] In Italy, it became commonplace by the 14th century, almost universally used by merchant and upper classes by the year 1600. It was proper for a guest to arrive with his own fork and spoon enclosed in a box called a cadena; this usage was introduced to the French court with Catherine de' Medici's entourage. In Portugal, forks began being used with Infanta Beatrice, Duchess of Viseu, king Manuel I of Portugal's mother.[12] That happened around 1450. Still forks were not commonly used in Western Europe until the 16th century when they became part of the etiquette in Italy.[13] It had also gained some currency in Spain by this time,[14] and its use gradually spread to France. Even at that, though, most of Europe did not adopt use of the fork until the 18th century.[6]

Italy is still in Europe, as it was back then, is it not?

The fork became popular in the Americas around the time of the American Revloution. So your post is a bit misleading;



The fork did not become common in northern Europe until the 18th century and was not common in North America until the 19th century


There was not a hundred years difference between the acceptance of the fork between the UK and America. Also, it must be remember that the people we are talkng about, the Americans that broke away from England, were in fact, English or from English stock separated by one generation.

So the very people you are trying to show to be ignorant and/or backward, are actually yourselves. :p


And on a side note, the flat fork, the orginal design, is making a big comeback in the US and some of Europe.

tony draper
26th Apr 2014, 23:35
Nah,the above is about the fork,a primitive devise that required two hands a foot pump and a assistant to operate,I was talking about the fork.:=

:rolleyes:

Hydromet
26th Apr 2014, 23:57
The jiggle test is the dynamic equivalent of the uk 'pencil test'.I young lady I knew admitted that she may not pass the pencil test, but guaranteed that she'd pass the 'put lead in your pencil' test.

Flash2001
27th Apr 2014, 00:07
Run from those who fail the crowbar test!

After etc...

ExSp33db1rd
27th Apr 2014, 04:56
Can't be any stranger than holding the fork upside downDefine upside down ?

I was taught - with the occasional clip around the ear to prove the point - that using the fork in what I call the upside down mode, i.e. as laid on the table, is akin to eating ones' food with a shovel, and if I wanted to eat like a pig I could join them outside.

Manners Maketh The Man - it used to be said.

Just sayin'

Solid Rust Twotter
27th Apr 2014, 06:40
Fork? What possible use could that be when tearing the throat out of your prey?


I suppose it may be useful for pinning a lawyer's briefcase to the ground to immobilise him in order to more quickly dispatch the prey...:suspect:

acbus1
27th Apr 2014, 07:15
What a load of forking nonsense. ;)

onetrack
27th Apr 2014, 08:04
Nissan engineers and ad people, provide the finest explanation of "jiggle test", that I've ever seen ... :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07N58d5S6v0

Pinky the pilot
27th Apr 2014, 08:32
My understanding of 'jiggle tests' is that when the young ladies stop 'bouncing around' all their body bits have to stop bouncing as well, immediately!:ooh:



Another way of putting it I guess.

tony draper
27th Apr 2014, 09:01
A damped oscillation as opposed to a undamped one, as it were.:rolleyes:

Worrals in the wilds
27th Apr 2014, 09:57
I suppose it may be useful for pinning a lawyer's briefcase to the ground to immobilise him in order to more quickly dispatch the prey...:suspect:They're a useful offensive weapon against lawyers who try and steal your chips because they ordered the trendy main course that didn't come with any :E. No fork, no chance; lawyer lunching is a blood sport, particularly when the bill arrives. :ooh::}

The thing I love about JB is that a thread started about cheerleaders (complete with photo) rapidly moved onto discussing cross-cultural fork etiquette. :cool::}

tony draper
27th Apr 2014, 10:13
There is a good reason why the fork came late to humanity, a neolithic flint napper could knock up a arrow head spear point or a knife blade in no time,however a flint fork is a different engineering proposition altogether,the theory of the fork was known of course, as cave paintings all over the world can attest(except in France where the fork is still unknown and fingers are still used) only when we Englishmen discovered metals did the idea become a possibility.
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
27th Apr 2014, 10:45
Cz2-ukrd2VQ

P6 Driver
27th Apr 2014, 12:23
http://z4.ifrm.com/12432/59/0/e43252//e43252.gif

Cacophonix
27th Apr 2014, 12:28
"Giggle, wiggle, jiggle".

What a fine lyric. Enough to put a smile on any man's dial! ;)

Once had identical twins in my class at school with the surname "Wigglesworth". If only they had been girls, but it was bad enough for the two boys that they were!

Caco