PDA

View Full Version : Men, women, & driving conditions


Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Apr 2014, 12:36
I commence with the statement that men generally drive faster than women, and have more accidents.
However, this morning we had particularly dodgy road conditions and the opposite was the case.
We have big potholes and flooded roads. Then last night we got 2 inches of snow (with drifting giving 6 inches in places) followed by several hours of freezing drizzle. A real nasty mix and not easy to control a vehicle.
But the women were driving at least 10 kph faster than the men. Didn't matter what kind of vehicle, including school buses. Once I'd noticed, I could predict the gender of the driver approaching by their speed. No exceptions, about 30 vehicles total.
This is curious, since in fog, for example, men still drive too fast and faster than women in my experience.
Mature comments please!

Cacophonix
25th Apr 2014, 12:43
"I commence with the statement that men generally drive faster than women, and have more" serious "accidents".

Caco

Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Apr 2014, 12:55
I understand it is both more, and more serious, in terms of reported accidents. I guess you're referring to bumps etc that don't get reported. You may be right - I don't have sufficient evidence or experience to contradict you (or back you).
My main question was about road surface conditions vs non-road driving conditions (e.g. visibility, fatigue, etc), and whether there was a gender difference in response.

Cacophonix
25th Apr 2014, 13:06
I wonder if this comes down to the psychology of appreciation of danger and our response to that. Speed is a visceral thing and sensually alerts us to varying degrees whereas fog is an insidious danger that is not appreciated sensually in the same way as speed. Men and women may respond differently to both sets of subtly different stimuli.

No psychologist but that's my starter for ten.

Caco

onetrack
25th Apr 2014, 13:30
Fox3 - You obviously haven't shared the road with "P Platers" (FYI - a "probationary" driver in Oz gets a "P" plate to display for 2 years after first getting their drivers licence. Red "P" plate is 1st year probationary, Green "P" plate is 2nd year probationary). 98% of "P" Platers are 17 or 18 yrs of age.

As a friend once confided accurately to me - "When you're hammering down the highway, pedal to the metal, and late for an important appointment - there's only two types of cars that regularly overtake you! - Hire cars - and "P" platers!"

Unfortunately, I find in recent times, that the most impatient and the fastest drivers of all the "P Platers", are young women. :(

ShyTorque
25th Apr 2014, 14:25
These are possibly the same sort of driver who, in a 60 mph limit at night, drives on constantly dipped headlights at 38 mph, yet still feel they must brake before and/or in shallow corners.

But on reaching a village, with a 30 mph limit, they speed up to 45 mph along the narrow road whilst closely passing rows of parked cars etc.

I think it's just a lack of proper driver education coupled with a lack of awareness after passing the driving test.

arcniz
25th Apr 2014, 14:30
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Malojapass.jpg/280px-Malojapass.jpg

Could it possibly be that ladies and women will somewhat rationally drive faster in snow and ice conditions for reasons of controlability, due to heightened anxiety owing to the conditions?

With statistically smaller frames, lighter bodies, etc., and less likely to be practiced in exercises that amplify upper body strength, many adult fems likely have experienced vehicles that are more difficult for them to drive (more than for chunky males) due to heavy vehicle weight or load, lack of power-assisted steering, poor maintenance or design, etc. causing the need for serious wrestling of the wheel to maneuver at slower speeds, especially in mud, slush, etc.

So the tradeoff there would be higher maneuverability vs risk of being unable to stop appropriately.

Cannot intuitively discern the merit of such a choice, but memory brings up the wholly terrifying steering experience a young lad once had driving down the Maloja Pass road, heading South out of St. Moritz., mid-winter and late of a February night, with no chains and summer tyres, in a very light-tailed and largely unfamiliar Volvo 123.

Seconds into starting the descent came discovery of absolutely zero accountable steering control on the deeply snowy road, right from the crest on down. Problem grew ever more serious and then went well beyond terrifying and finally just existentially bizarre for a million km or so of hairpin turns and straightaways done sideways, vs the normal nose-first way, all the way down to the very bottom of the eternity-like ziggy course. Along the way, neither much steering authority was available, nor any discernible braking effect, for the whole long twisty ride, with four souls on board and not an ounce of normal traction during the eternity or two it took to descend a thousand meters into very welcome rain and slush . Mostly all of the multi-km traverse was done with Volvo pointed sideways to the line of the road. Survival clearly was iffy, but poor judgement and luck combined to somehow just barely make it work.

(anecdote included to help the ladies seem a mite better in context of steering machines and things, bless 'em.)

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/03/cc/9f/54/maloja-pass.jpg

rans6andrew
25th Apr 2014, 14:40
I have a theory for this. If you persistently drive your car closer to the limits in good, dry, conditions you develop a feel for the amount of grip available on the road surface from what you feel through the steering wheel. You also feel how the steering is affected by the use of the brakes or accelerator. You can feel how much reserve grip there is. When the roads are wet/slippery/icy the feel of the steering is so different (much lighter) that you are fooled into thinking that there is less grip than there really is and hence you don't drive as quickly.

If, on the other hand, you never get close to the limits and don't push the envelope out a bit you might not recognise the different feel to the wheel and thus you don't back off as much.

Rans6......

Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Apr 2014, 14:43
Shy - women have worse night vision

DType
25th Apr 2014, 14:49
Yes, when conditions are good, speed limit is irrelevant and one can often safely go much faster.
When conditions are bad, speed limit is irrelevant and one must go much slower to be safe.
Well, where's the logic in a blanket 24/7/52 speed limit?

"Rules are for the observance of fools and the guidance of the wise"

There is SOME truth in the above!

DT

ShyTorque
25th Apr 2014, 15:24
Shy - women have worse night vision

I didn't actually state that I was referring to the female gender...

But then it would still be logical, if not more so, to drive on main beam as much as possible, rather than on dipped headlights. :)

Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Apr 2014, 15:42
Indeed, and I used to coach my mother to use main beam as much as possible before she wisely gave up night driving. She tended not to because she didn't want to offend anybody. I pointed out that crashing into her wrecked car would be likely to offend them. She took the point.

Driver education
99% of people on the road are not drivers. They are texters/workers/mates/mothers/people on their way to a meeting/etc. who happen to be sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle. The mindset is all wrong, and the vast majority of driver education is wasted until the mindset is right.

Dushan
25th Apr 2014, 16:12
We (in North America) don't teach people how to drive; we teach them how to operate a car.

Women seem to have more low speed fender benders in parking lots, while parking on the street, coming out of parking spots, tuning, and not sufficiently paying attention to what "the other guy" is going to do.

Men have the "hi-curamba" spectacular wrecks, but they are invincible because the car has 17 air bags (18 including the driver), stability control, traction control, 4 wheel drive... you get the picture.

And, RGB, check the original post and where the white, cold stuff comes from. The Maritimes, not Ford Nation.

ExXB
25th Apr 2014, 17:02
Half of all drivers are worse than average. But if you ask them the majority think they are better than average.

chksix
25th Apr 2014, 18:38
S. Loeb is the only one worthy of being called a driver.
Old news but worth watching again:
Sebastien Loeb demolishes Pikes Peak record with an 8:13.878 [UPDATE: w/video] - Autoblog (http://www.autoblog.com/2013/06/30/sebastian-loeb-demolishes-the-pikes-peak-record-with-an-8-13-878/) :ooh:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y20CLumT2Sg

mixture
25th Apr 2014, 20:26
We (in North America) don't teach people how to drive; we teach them how to operate a car.


I think you merely teach people how to sit down and turn on the ignition in America .... is it actually possible to fail a driving test in the USA or are you protected by some god-given Amendement or other ? :cool:

I stayed in a B&B in the US recently and posted on the information board in the hotel, there was a detailed set of serious instructions for guests telling them how to drive round a roundabout.

con-pilot
25th Apr 2014, 21:55
I stayed in a B&B in the US recently and posted on the information board in the hotel, there was a detailed set of serious instructions for guests telling them how to drive round a roundabout.

That is because in the US, we have few roundabouts (which we actually call traffic circles), instead we have STOP signs and/or YIELD signs at intersections that do not require traffic lights. Works very well, except when Brits like you show up that cannot understand what STOP means. :p

Sorry that we don't spend billions of dollars to change all those intersections to roundabouts just to make you happy on the few occasions you come to the US and stay in a B&B. :cool:

Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Apr 2014, 22:41
In PEI, before the first roundabout,they built a mock-up of the junction on a nearby airfield so people could practice - and lots did!

Nobody indicates, but everyone's so polite that there's no crowding anyway. We still stop for pedestrians here.

There are more roundabouts in Milton Keynes than there are in the whole of Canada; so, as Con-pilot says, they are pretty rare things.

mixture
25th Apr 2014, 22:54
instead we have STOP signs and/or YIELD signs at intersections that do not require traffic lights.

Oh those stupid waste of space things. Incredibly inefficient, can't cope with the slightest traffic volumes. Also, as your very own WSDOT admits (http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/safety/roundabouts/benefits.htm), roundabouts are safer and reduce injury crashes by 75%.

US and stay in a B&B.

Believe me, I wish I hadn't stayed in that B&B....but it was a small town in the middle of nowhere surrounded by nothing but other small towns. So it was a choice between that or being ripped off by the Hilton family. Having already spent a week on that visit at a conference doing the latter, I thought they'd had their share.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Apr 2014, 22:58
Well, here at least we don't have the slightest traffic volumes, and a stop sign (or 4) is a lot cheaper than a roundabout.

mixture
25th Apr 2014, 23:09
Well, here at least we don't have the slightest traffic volumes, and a stop sign (or 4) is a lot cheaper than a roundabout.

I'd still enjoy watching your beloved stop signs suffer an epic fail at the hands of proper traffic volumes (e.g. Waggoners Roundabout near LHR or even busier ones elsewhere since Waggonner is only a three lane roundabout ). :)

fujii
26th Apr 2014, 00:03
Mythbusters did a session on roundabouts to prove how much more efficient they were.

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 00:38
There are more roundabouts in Milton Keynes than there are in the whole of Canada; so, as Con-pilot says, they are pretty rare things.

And let's keep it that way. They are the work of a devil. Stupidest thing ever invented.

As con-pilot said we have stop and yield signs. Nothing more needed.

Seldomfitforpurpose
26th Apr 2014, 00:41
yield signs. Nothing more needed.


Never work here, taking your turn whilst driving, never going to catch on :(

Mechta
26th Apr 2014, 01:00
The first time driving in Limassol, Cyprus was an experience. To a Cypriot, a red traffic light means 'proceed with caution'. Stopping did not appear to be an option worthy of consideration.

An ex-pat put the driving styles to me as, 'British drive on the left, Americans drive on the right, Cypriots drive in the shade.'

How any American can consider traffic lights to be superior to roundabouts beats me. The number of times I have been sat waiting at an American traffic light in the early hours of the morning, without a car in sight, waiting for the light to go green. What should be a journey of minutes across a town can take half an hour or more, if each set of lights is against you. On a roundabout, in the same situation, you barely need to slow down.

ExSp33db1rd
26th Apr 2014, 01:14
..........yet still feel they must brake before and/or in shallow corners.Yes, why do people do that, have they no sense of inertia, just taking the foot of the gas pedal in time achieves the same effect, if done in time.

Mrs. ExS, with a USA licence, had to undergo a NZ road test ( my UK licence was accepted) and was chastised for not 'proceeding' at the 100 kph speed limit on a stretch of road that had been selected for that very purpose, but the local fuzz don't seem to be bothered to enforce it, braking every time the road changes colour is a frequent observation.

As con-pilot said we have stop and yield signs. Nothing more needed. On a roundabout, in the same situation, you barely need to slow down. well said Mechta, totally agree, except that NZ drivers think "Give way" and "Stop" mean the same thing ! "Give way" means do-not-impede-the-progress-of, it does not necessarily mean "Stop" but NZ drivers don't understand that and routinely stop at the entrance of a roundabout if there is any other vehicle in sight, even if on the other side just starting the circulation !

I've read that when UK 'invented' roundabouts the feeling was that neither road need even slow down if the system was used properly, unlike "Stop" signs but of course traffic volumes have made that statement invalid now, but NZ have "invented" one useful road sign - e.g. "Merge like a Zip" works wonders at busy motorway intersections, as drivers embrace this commonsense advice to keep the traffic flowing.

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 01:22
How any American can consider traffic lights to be superior to roundabouts beats me.

Because traffic lights, and stop/yield signs are definitive instruction with no room for error. Roundabouts rely on some overriding rule that traffic arriving from right/left has priority and that the other traffic must yield to it. That is way too confusing. One usually must stop texting in order to determine which way to go and who has the right of way in a roundabout.

parabellum
26th Apr 2014, 02:10
Only the person(s) actually on the roundabout have right of way.


Personally I find roundabouts are much less of a waste of time and petrol than stop signs and traffic lights. Dutch friends and rellies coming to England or Australia love them!

Cacophonix
26th Apr 2014, 02:14
Michelle ma belle... :ok:

Excusez moi...Michele... (Mois, je suis Caco ni(s) homme ni(s) baboon).. :-)

The fastest girl ever - Michele Mouton - YouTube

Caco

airship
26th Apr 2014, 02:25
Fox3WheresMyBanana wrote in his opening post: But the women were driving at least 10 kph faster than the men. Didn't matter what kind of vehicle, including school buses. Once I'd noticed, I could predict the gender of the driver approaching by their speed. No exceptions, about 30 vehicles total.
Which was preceded with the observation that: Then last night we got 2 inches of snow (with drifting giving 6 inches in places) followed by several hours of freezing drizzle. A real nasty mix and not easy to control a vehicle.

The answer appears quite obvious to me. Since male sexual organs are exterior to the main body mass, male drivers tend to feel the cold more rapidly than their female counterparts. All our machismo seems to shrivel up and it's us male drivers who are both more capable but also for a change, more cautious in this instance... :ok: :uhoh:

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 03:11
Only the person(s) actually on the roundabout have right of way.




Really? What sense does tha make? So a guy get in at 9:00, I get in at 6:00 and we both want to exit at 3:00, we do what? A bit of a demolition derby to see who can get out first?

llondel
26th Apr 2014, 03:23
I have a theory for this. If you persistently drive your car closer to the limits in good, dry, conditions you develop a feel for the amount of grip available on the road surface from what you feel through the steering wheel. You also feel how the steering is affected by the use of the brakes or accelerator. You can feel how much reserve grip there is. When the roads are wet/slippery/icy the feel of the steering is so different (much lighter) that you are fooled into thinking that there is less grip than there really is and hence you don't drive as quickly.

I used to drive much closer to the limits and yes, I could feel what the car was doing. Chewed up a lot of tyres due to speed on roundabouts, and also had my first proper skid due to a rear tyre with a nail in it (10psi when I checked it later) but recovered without realising how I did it. I hated my first car with power steering until I got used to how it felt, and even now, out on the freeway in rain I'm still sensitive to how it feels.

That is because in the US, we have few roundabouts (which we actually call traffic circles), instead we have STOP signs and/or YIELD signs at intersections that do not require traffic lights. Works very well, except when Brits like you show up that cannot understand what STOP means. :p

Some parts of the US call a roundabout a rotary. First time I encountered one I was impressed that it existed, then gave my brain a mild frying coping with it all being backwards compared to a UK one. STOP signs are very fuel-inefficient, forcing lots of braking and acceleration and wear and tear on the vehicle. Especially irritating on a bicycle when there's no traffic. I think Brits instinctively rebel against the requirement to have to physically stop when it's clear from observation that there is nothing else in sight. Three are similar signs in the UK, but they are usually found in places of poor visibility where it is safer to stop.

There are more roundabouts in Milton Keynes than there are in the whole of Canada; so, as Con-pilot says, they are pretty rare things.

The A421 through Milton Keynes. thirteen roundabouts, 6.7 miles, 7 minutes. Except they've added another one on the approach from the M1 since I did that so it's now 14 roundabouts and 7.3 miles.

Really? What sense does tha make? So a guy get in at 9:00, I get in at 6:00 and we both want to exit at 3:00, we do what? A bit of a demolition derby to see who can get out first?

You give way to someone already on the roundabout, just like a yield sign. Assuming US directions, if the guy arriving at 9:00 is likely to arrive at your entry point before you can safely clear it, you yield to him and follow him round to the exit at 3:00. If your speed is OK, you pull out in front of him and you get to go first. Provided you're not busy texting, it works just fine. Think of it as a one-way street with yield signs on all the entrances.

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 03:32
You give way to someone already on the roundabout, just like a yield sign. Assuming US directions, if the guy arriving at 9:00 is likely to arrive at your entry point before you can safely clear it, you yield to him and follow him round to the exit at 3:00. If your speed is OK, you pull out in front of him and you get to go first. Provided you're not busy texting, it works just fine. Think of it as a one-way street with yield signs on all the entrances.

Sorry still doesn't make sense. May be something to do with size. The few we have are big enough that a car can be in it heading for his exit and I can be in it at the same time heading for the same exit.

No such thing as one way street with yield signs on entrances. All stop signs or red lights.

onetrack
26th Apr 2014, 03:35
The biggest problem is that people don't stop at STOP signs - and they often choose not to YIELD, when they should, according to the road rules.
If I had a dollar for every car I saw drive straight through the STOP sign, that's 100M up the street from my house, at 20kmh, I'd be pretty wealthy.
I've seen dozens and dozens of near-misses at that intersection, but no major crash yet. It will happen.

At the very least, roundabouts prevent T-Boning and major injuries, even though half the population still can't figure out how they work.
I just love the people who come to a roundabout, and who then promptly stop, and look both ways. :rolleyes:

The second biggest problem of course, is the number of people behind the wheel who don't understand, or even know, the most basic of road rules.
I don't know how many times I've stopped at a stop sign on a road intersecting a divided 4-lane, waiting to cross the 4-lane - and someone at the stop sign on the opposite side takes off and turns in front of me, the instant I drive off. :suspect: :ugh:

parabellum
26th Apr 2014, 03:39
Dushan - you are just being difficult! Right of way only applies if there is a conflict, someone on the roundabout has R of W over someone joining it. Provided there are 90 degrees or more between vehicles there should be no conflict.

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 04:08
All I know is that whenever I found myself in one, it was either me honking at someone or he honking at me, or people, behind honking as we both came to a stop and tried to figure out how to both exit via the same street.

onetrack
26th Apr 2014, 04:23
Dushan - Here in Oz we have a simple rule. In merging traffic, the vehicle in front has right of way.
No honking because someone "cut you off in your 100mph run" - you give way to any merging vehicle that's physically in front of your vehicle - even if its only half a car length, and even if it does mean you have to back off the loud pedal.
So many accidents are caused by impatience, a "me-first" attitude, and demanding right of way, when the road rules state otherwise.

ExSp33db1rd
26th Apr 2014, 04:37
I just love the people who come to a roundabout, and who then promptly stop, and look both ways.

Don't come and drive in NZ then, standard practice, usually with a right indicator flashing - and then go straight across.

One could weep !

Cacophonix
26th Apr 2014, 04:42
SpeedB

Don't you find NZ just a tad boring...?

Tupolev 154 Reverses Power Before Touchdown! - YouTube


Caco

Krystal n chips
26th Apr 2014, 05:40
As the cousins are easily confused, it would probably be a good idea for any visiting these shores and intent on driving, to avoid Hemel Hempstead and Swindon, unless they really want to experience the "delights" of the roundabouts associated with these towns.....nightmare is the best term you can use to describe the layouts.

The latest wheeze around here however, is to use the roundabout as a convenient overtaking point....you simply zip through on the outside and cut up any driver on the inside as the road becomes single lane again...the ego's of the drivers prone to doing this are invariably reflected in the choice of cars.

airship
26th Apr 2014, 06:01
Let's get one thing straight here?!

Everyone with a female partner obviously insures their car/s under the name of their partners as it's well-known that all the insurance companies give female drivers automatically at least 10% lower premiums for the same policy?! Duhhh..you didn't?! How indecently macho of you sir/s!

parabellum
26th Apr 2014, 06:14
Maybe in your neck of the woods Airship but not here, the cheapest premium goes to the most experienced driver, by age!


The 'norm' around here, Gippsland, in Victoria, is young mothers in 4X4s with two or three young kids up and who drive without the slightest thought for other road users, usually several Kms. per hour over the limit. Never park next to them either, when the kids throw open the heavy doors invariably they bang into your vehicle. (The spaces are not as generous as in the USA).

ExSp33db1rd
26th Apr 2014, 07:18
Don't you find NZ just a tad boring...?

My lips are sealed !

acbus1
26th Apr 2014, 08:15
Cyclists can usually tell when a woman overtakes them: inches of clearance.

Show them a parked car and they'll give it yards.


Before I'm moderated, 1 inch = 2.54 cm, you sort it out.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2014, 11:01
Some interesting discussion.
I'm going to go with Rans6's idea back on post #8; men being more aware of the change in grip because they push it more in the dry.

Can I point out, re roundabouts v. stop signs, that for about the last 5 months round here one was stopping at all junctions anyway because of the snowbanks on the corners restricting visibility.

Hotel Tango
26th Apr 2014, 11:24
The Netherlands suddenly caught on to roundabouts a few years ago and they sprung up everywhere. Unfortunately, Dutch drivers still have problems making the correct signals when using them. The worst thing, and in my opinion the most dangerous, is that traffic exiting the roundabout has to yield to cyclists on the cycle path, basically leaving the rear of one's car exposed to a fender bender.

ShyTorque
26th Apr 2014, 11:42
Driver education
99% of people on the road are not drivers. They are texters/workers/mates/mothers/people on their way to a meeting/etc. who happen to be sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle. The mindset is all wrong, and the vast majority of driver education is wasted until the mindset is right.

F3,

Couldn't agree more. IME, many women see driving as a necessary evil. My wife just can't get her head around the fact that myself and our sons like cars and driving in their own right, as an enjoyable pastime. She only drives because I'm not always there to drive her around. She always prefers to be driven rather than drive (and then nods off in minutes and rolls around on corners like a cadaver).

As my daughter said recently, "Dad, when you drive, Mum always goes to sleep. When Mum drives, no-one goes to sleep!"

vulcanised
26th Apr 2014, 12:42
Nothing wrong with roundabouts until some feckwit decided to put traffic lights on the entrances.

ShyTorque
26th Apr 2014, 12:57
Or, even worse, just after the exit. We have one near us, with a traffic light controlled pedestrian crossing about 10 metres after you exit onto an A road dual carriageway. There are five roads connected by this roundabout. Drivers have to brake suddenly for the red lights as they are exiting the roundabout (made worse by a fairly tight left bend as you exit) and it causes many rear end/left quarter shunts and a lot of congestion. Drivers coming onto the roundabout at the previous entrance get taken by surprise when they have to brake suddenly for traffic on their left, which appeared to be exiting. Understandably, drivers about to enter the roundabout are mainly looking to their right.... :}

Blacksheep
26th Apr 2014, 13:38
Sounds like Hatfield with its Galleria/Comet roundabout that has traffic lights all the way around and pedestrian controlled crossings on the exits. I just had to stop at red lights three times to get around it. I'd be I favour of one of those Ethiopian junctions. Far more efficient!

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hVLaYHNpS7M

Mechta
26th Apr 2014, 13:39
I'm glad K n C mentioned Hemel Hempstead. For the last year or so, I've been going through there twice a week, Here is the road sign, and even my first thought was WTF!!! :eek::

http://www.tachoblog.com/wp-content/uploads/090415-magic-roundabout-hh-sign.jpg

Once you have done it a few times, its not too bad, But it does get congested on a Friday afternoon if, as I do, you are coming in from Leighton Buzzard and out towards the A41 (the middle road at the bottom of the sign). Its not so bad late on Sunday night, but you do need to keep your wits about you.

For those of you unfamiliar with it, you can go around the big circle either way, but each small roundabout only in normal fashion. I would not suggest this system should be adopted anywhere else!

Blacksheep
26th Apr 2014, 13:46
Of course, it's much safer in the West, with our better designed intersections with traffic lights and "Give Way" rules . . .

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=INMiXqP8vI0

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 13:50
Nothing wrong with roundabouts until some feckwit decided to put traffic lights on the entrances.

The insurance companies probably offered to pay for the light.

Blacksheep
26th Apr 2014, 20:45
The Ethiopians don't seem to use the "right of way" principle. They just have the good manners not to bump into each other. We could learn much from them.

con-pilot
26th Apr 2014, 21:09
How any American can consider traffic lights to be superior to roundabouts beats me.

Then please explain traffic lights at aroundabouts in the UK, that I have sat stopped at, watching no traffic go through that have the green light signal, because there was no traffic?

If roundabouts, a total waste of space and money, are so superior, why do you need traffic lights on many of them?

Just askin'.

Seldomfitforpurpose
26th Apr 2014, 21:37
If roundabouts, a total waste of space and money, are so superior, why do you need traffic lights on many of them?

Just askin'.

Having driven extensively here and in the US I know where I would prefer to drive.

The 4 way stop is probably the most civilised driving concept I have ever encountered and something the ignorant Cnuts that mainly occupy UK roads would never cope with, taking your turn is a totally alien concept over here :(

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 21:46
OMG, SFFP and I agree on something.

Seldomfitforpurpose
26th Apr 2014, 21:49
OMG, SFFP and I agree on something.

I suspect you will find that we agree on a very wide spectrum of matters, including most gun issues :ok:

Dushan
26th Apr 2014, 22:12
Ugh, shucks, this must be some kind of JB record. 59 posts before guns were mentioned. Just don't mention the war; I mentioned it once, but I think I got away with it.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2014, 22:18
Well, I think that's a good point to wrap up the thread.
Two records and the original question was answered to the OP's satisfaction.
Thanks folks;enjoy the rest of your weekend :ok:

Seldomfitforpurpose
26th Apr 2014, 22:18
Just don't mention the war; I mentioned it once, but I think I got away with it.


Basil: Listen, don't mention the war! I mentioned it once, but I think I got away with it all right. [returns to the Germans] So! It's all forgotten now, and let's hear no more about it. So, that's two egg mayonnaise, a prawn Goebbels, a Hermann Goering, and four Colditz salads.
Basil: Is there something wrong?
Elder Herr: Will you stop talking about the war?
Basil: Me! You started it!
Elder Herr: We did not start it!
Basil: Yes you did you invaded Poland

Possibly one of the funniest comedy moments ever :ok:

ExSp33db1rd
26th Apr 2014, 22:41
The 4 way stop is probably the most civilised driving concept I have ever encountered.....................


That assumes that the words - a) civilised - and b) stop - are understood.

A big ask in many places ( my lips are sealed )

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2014, 23:01
That assumes that the words ... stop - are understood.

Clueless

http://stream1.gifsoup.com/view3/3868367/totally-paused-o.gif

"That was a STOP"
"I totally paused"

Hydromet
27th Apr 2014, 00:03
A Sri Lankan colleague who is an excellent driver reckons it takes her about three days to get back into the local driving style when she returns there, during which time she is scared to death. When she returns to Australia, it takes her another three days to get back to our style, during which everyone is scared to death of her.

Seldomfitforpurpose
27th Apr 2014, 00:09
A Sri Lankan colleague who is an excellent driver reckons it takes her about three days to get back into the local driving style when she returns there, during which time she is scared to death. When she returns to Australia, it takes her another three days to get back to our style, during which everyone is scared to death of her.

We have recently returned from a 4 week India and 2 week Sri Lanka tour, I have never ever ever ever ever ever been so scared as a passenger in a car.............'kin mad the bloody lot of them :ok:

onetrack
27th Apr 2014, 01:36
Here's the Bigfella doing a motorbike tour of Central Java, utilising his interpretation of the local road rules, with added speed. Amazingly, he's still alive.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=St492G4VeoY