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View Full Version : How ignorant do you need to be to be a decision making Council offiical?


radeng
18th Apr 2014, 16:37
BBC News - Oxford Cowley Road procession after Passion Play mix-up (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-oxfordshire-27076776)

Incredible ignorance......

Fareastdriver
18th Apr 2014, 16:58
He, or she probably thought it was soft porn.

UniFoxOs
18th Apr 2014, 16:59
And not just a front-line pen-pusher:-

Julian Alison, Licensing Team Leader at Oxford City Council...

My bold.

Lightning Mate
18th Apr 2014, 17:09
You have to be a totally uneducated moronic
a*****e.

Dushan
18th Apr 2014, 18:00
I am sure they knew, exactly, what hey were doing but tried to disguise it as some kind of ignorance/mistake.

Next Ramadan parade will be approved, pronto.

racedo
18th Apr 2014, 18:31
I put it down as sheer ignorance of official.

Its only Christians.

As someone who attended services this afternoon was surprised about actual numbers and figure 10-15% up on last year.

Tankertrashnav
19th Apr 2014, 00:49
Oxford - one of the most ancient seats of learning in Europe, if not the world :ugh:

FullOppositeRudder
19th Apr 2014, 03:10
A somewhat typical example of how local government manages to get it wrong most of the time.:sad:

One needs to be an especially gifted imbecile to be capable of making some of the decisions I've seen around here over the years.

acbus1
19th Apr 2014, 08:27
Perfectly understandable, given that Christianity is such a minority religion in the UK.

Shandy52
19th Apr 2014, 09:25
Interestingly, my wife and I happened to be at my stepson's house, and took the opportunity to see whether he and his partner knew what a Passion play was. They didn't, even though my wife - his mother - did know.

This sort of ignorance is worryingly widespread. But in fairness, perhaps the numpty LG officer ought not to be considered uniquely stupid.

vulcanised
19th Apr 2014, 12:47
Lidl want to open a new store nearby. They asked residents over a large area what they thought of the proposal. 97% were in favour.

The council said no. :ugh:

OFSO
19th Apr 2014, 12:57
The States of Jersey (CI) ruled that "it was not in the interests of the public" to allow LOCO carriers like Ryanair and easyJet to fly to the island.

Fareastdriver
19th Apr 2014, 13:05
Dead right. If they can't afford to fly with a proper airline they can stick with the bucket & spade brigade in the Costas.

jimtherev
19th Apr 2014, 13:13
from follow-up article 'A spokesman for council added: "As far as we are aware the organisers did not question the decision at a higher level within the organisation."' It must have been the organisers' fault all the time, for believing that the head of planning was competent.


So that's all right, then.

OFSO
19th Apr 2014, 14:48
a proper airline

Ecktually, a proper airline (or rather, The Very Proper Airline) is quite often cheaper than the LoCo - AND they don't charge baggage fees for the spade and bucket, either.

Gertrude the Wombat
19th Apr 2014, 21:44
Lidl want to open a new store nearby. They asked residents over a large area what they thought of the proposal. 97% were in favour.

The council said no. :ugh:
Planning descisions are the quasi-judicial application of planning law to the policies in force. The number or people who do or don't want something is totally and utterly irrelevant.

If you don't like that - and I can understand people not liking that - then your target should be central government who write the law, not councils who have no choice but to obey it.

(More often it's a case of councils giving permission for a development, because they have no legal alternative, when 97% of the punters are against it. But it can go the other way. Losing JRs can be very expensive.)

Daysleeper
19th Apr 2014, 22:11
Hardly surprising if someone (even a council official) has never heard of an infrequent public act by a minority group. I grew up in a christian household and went to sunday school and church; until this year I'd never heard of passion plays either. Having done some reading it seems to be a relatively small subset of christianity that holds these events.

(by minority I mean that 65% of people say they are not religious and just over 5% of the population attend CofE type church regularly.)

Neptunus Rex
19th Apr 2014, 22:30
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberammergau_Passion_Play‎

Been running over three hundred years longer than 'The Mousetrap.'

Effluent Man
20th Apr 2014, 08:12
Whilst I knew of "Passion Plays" I think I first noticed them on being on holiday in Germany at Easter.As has been observed Christianity is now pretty much a niche interest,about the same as train spotting.Although at least you can prove the existence of trains.