PDA

View Full Version : Little pearls you find in the strangest places


Windy Militant
15th Apr 2014, 18:28
Whilst furtling about in the Ppruniverse you come across many strange and wondrous things in the oddest of places.
Just spotted this at the bottom of the story about the great leaders dodgy barnet.

BBC News - A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-26969150)

breathtaking pictures and it restores your faith in dear old mother Earth, having said that the jury's still out on the rest of the Human race! ;)

Jhieminga
15th Apr 2014, 21:10
No need to worry about the beak, it's the talons you want to steer clear of! A lot of falconers that fly eagles get 'footed' at one time or another. It generally leaves a mark...

Great story and images, thanks!

500N
15th Apr 2014, 21:20
Trying to pry open the gripping talons of any bird of prey
makes your eyes water :O

vulcanised
15th Apr 2014, 21:31
I had the pleasure of looking after an injured Tawny Owl for several months and he used to grip my bare hand with one foot while I was feeding him :eek:

Trouble was he used to forget he had hold of me and several times I got soaked in the pouring rain while I was forced to stand there trying to persuade him to let go.

His beak just tickled.

G-CPTN
15th Apr 2014, 21:35
I believe that birds' feet 'grip' in the released position (so that they don't fall off the perch when they sleep)?

Edited to add:- http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1987-04-05/features/8701260243_1_bird-leg-toes

500N
15th Apr 2014, 21:40
Vulcan

We also had a Tawny Owl for over a year and that was one of the one's that used to grip really hard.

Eventually it managed to escape from the wooden shed we had it in but we know it survived for a few years until hot by a car many miles away so it had a good life.

Mudman
16th Apr 2014, 16:15
Some truly beautiful photos. I know first hand the strength of these animals from the work I do at the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre. (http://cwrc.net)

You can really feel the power of their talons through the gloves. I have been "footed" by several different species, an eagle, and several owls. We do our best to protect ourselves but because these are all wild animals they are unpredictable and sometimes find a way past the protective measures.

If they are awake and fully alert I'll wear the gloves, coverall, steel-toe boots (the birds are usually on the ground in a small enclosure when we go to grab them), a metal gorget to protect my neck and a face shield. If they are waking from anesthetic as in the first two photos or if I have handled them before and know their "personality" I can be a little more relaxed.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-d4JaDw6GtYE/U06p8ygAiMI/AAAAAAAAKRk/FHDTOuJedaM/s720/IMG_6766.JPG

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-5Qt-Y3wYpyM/U06p9z3GYwI/AAAAAAAAKRs/hY6UdYpcVME/s720/IMG_7721.JPG

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-MLAQe9fGphw/U06qJM8j1iI/AAAAAAAAKR0/kNbCPpI29Hk/s512/2013-10-15%252022.30.00.jpg

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-d4JaDw6GtYE/U06p8ygAiMI/AAAAAAAAKRk/FHDTOuJedaM/s720/IMG_6766.JPGhttp://

Akrotiri71
16th Apr 2014, 16:50
This Golden Eagle had a "firm handshake", I can tell you. :ooh: (Quite fond of dead day-old chicks too).
An absolutely beautiful creature.

http://i58.tinypic.com/r8i3h4.jpg

airship
16th Apr 2014, 18:05
Take 1 big Eagle (doesn't matter if it's a Golden Eagle or a Bald Eagle - they're all bald or should be once properly plucked...). But it's the stuffing which makes all the difference: instead of using chicken giblets, use fox liver and heart. And be sure to add Basil to the mix of usual herbs, spices and other ingredients. Roast in oven (or deep-fry - ask con-pilot's advice for best results) as you would for a big turkey. :ok:

Seriously though, I wonder if perhaps consuming eagles occasionally might have once been part of native American or other traditional culture/s elsewhere. I've heard that Osama Bin Laden together with other Al-Qaeda higher-ups regularly feasted on "Bald Eagles", except these were more probably an African variety according to a CIA source. :(

PS. Going back to the OP, the BBC article says: The eagles are not bred in captivity, but taken from nests at a young age. Female eaglets are chosen since they grow to a larger size - a large adult might be as heavy as seven kilos, with a wingspan of over 230cm. After years of service, on a spring morning, a hunter releases his mature eagle a final time, leaving a butchered sheep on the mountain as a farewell present. "That's how the Kazakh eagle hunters make sure that the eagles go back to nature and have their own strong newborns, for the sake of future generations", Svidensky says. If that's true, then the sacrifice of a few foxes "now and then" might be acceptable, all points considered.

PPS. Please excuse me Mudman for all the above. This is JetBlast after all...?! And we have a reputation to protect! BTW, I believe the eagles and owls do see the "hello" in your own eyes... :ok:

"We Miss You John Denver" Features rare song "No One" - YouTube

John Denver-Fly Away - YouTube

airship
16th Apr 2014, 19:01
So sorry about that Basil! Obviously, I mean't the herb "small B" or perhaps Basil Brush, best eaten cold for full flavour... :ok:

Basil Brush - Colditz Escape - YouTube

PS. If it's all good enough to put the Germans off the scent, it'll probably work with the eagles too...

Jhieminga
16th Apr 2014, 21:11
Trying to pry open the gripping talons of any bird of prey
makes your eyes water
Don't bother trying that. There's a tendon in their feet which is, for want of a better word, ribbed and this has the same effect as the ratchet on the handbrake of your car. They need to actively 'release' this ratchet, until then the feet are locked closed.

Light up a cigarette (keeps your mind off the pain with a bit of luck), hope you've brought enough smokes and wait. They will let go once they lose interest, it might just take a while.;)

500N
16th Apr 2014, 21:15
Thanks

Didn't know that.


After of course finding out the hard way, I used to use a mouse or some food to distract them and / or get them to lift the foot or try putting them onto a stick.

Mudman
16th Apr 2014, 22:53
Originally posted by Jhieminga
Don't bother trying that. There's a tendon in their feet which is, for want of a better word, ribbed and this has the same effect as the ratchet on the handbrake of your car. They need to actively 'release' this ratchet, until then the feet are locked closed.

Light up a cigarette (keeps your mind off the pain with a bit of luck), hope you've brought enough smokes and wait. They will let go once they lose interest, it might just take a while.


Alternatively, if you're handy to an anesthetic machine, knock the bird out. :)
Every flinch you make entices the bird to clamp down tighter. It is quite surprising and unforgettable the strength they have.

airship
18th Apr 2014, 18:34
It is with mitigated joy that I witnessed 3 (yes, just 3 swifts) in the sky from my balcony this evening. They're back again here in the south of France after their winter sojourn in Africa.

With mitigated joy, because today also marks the 1st anniversary of the death of my mum. airship has been an orphan for a year now, and noone apparently wishes to adopt me. :sad:

Perhaps one of the 3 swifts was someone I (or you) once used to know...?!
Whatever, thank heaven for small pleasures...

Fantome
18th Apr 2014, 19:02
do not fret about such trivial concerns. you were presumably no foundling left on doorstep. birds are birds. humans are humans and no human ever became bird in any sense in another life.

the poem 'birds' by Judith Wright is truly beautiful, finely wrought
and 'ah' making -

Birds


Whatever the bird is, is perfect in the bird.
Weapon kestrel hard as a blade’s curve,
thrush round as a mother or a full drop of water,
fruit-green parrot wise in his shrieking swerve –
all are what bird is and do not reach beyond bird.


Whatever the bird does is right for the bird to do –
cruel kestrel dividing in his hunger the sky,
thrush in the trembling dew beginning to sing,
parrot clinging and quarrelling and veiling his queer eye –
all these are as birds are and good for birds to do.


But I am torn and beleaguered by my own people.
The blood that feeds my heart is the blood they gave me,
and my heart is the house where they gather and fight for dominion –
all different, all with a wish and a will to save me,
to turn me into the ways of other people.


If I could leave their battleground for the forest of a bird
I could melt the past, the present and the future in one
and find the words that lie behind all these languages.
Then I could fuse my passions into one clear stone
and be simple to myself as the bird is to the bird.