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Cacophonix
13th Apr 2014, 22:31
Useless handling, bad Ford technology but cool (look at Minder). Did you woo her in one or did you race one of the mind bogglingly fast Peranas...? (with respect to Bobby Olthoff, Basil van Rooyen and the whole Basil Green stable).

Whatever you did you must remember the Capri?

Production Car Race from Rand Spring Trophy, Kyalami (silent) - YouTube

Caco

500N
13th Apr 2014, 22:35
Remember ?

The Capri's (and the Escorts) in The Professionals, usually being thrashed by Bodie and Doyle :ok:

Metro man
13th Apr 2014, 22:36
The British equivalent of the Pontiac TransAm, the white trash sports car. 2.8i model towards the end was quite nice though and was a reasonable competitor to the Porsche 924.

mini
13th Apr 2014, 22:43
The original hairdressers Porsche.

Car trailer rear suspension, weighed in like a Sumo, handled like a firecracker.

Sexy as hell! The Mk1 is my favorite.

But its a looker - nowt else :(

500N
13th Apr 2014, 22:51
Until they got a 6 cylinder in it !

Out Of Trim
13th Apr 2014, 23:30
I owned a Gold Ford Capri 1.6GL with beige interior and beige vinyl roof when I was 19, young free and single! A 1977 model MK2 and wasn't bad for a young man's street cred in 1981 and was definitely a step up from my previous MK1 Escort Estate!

I wasn't single for very long! :ok:

It handled terribly at first until I found the tyre pressures were at 40 psi!

Enneagram3
14th Apr 2014, 00:16
Now a good one will set you back £15k :D

500N
14th Apr 2014, 00:19
I was going to mention pricing, glad you did.

Both Capri's and Ford Escort command top prices now,
especially the better one's.

Dushan
14th Apr 2014, 00:30
Never mind Ford; how many lives do you have Caco?

Keef
14th Apr 2014, 00:39
I started with a 1600GT, which was "nice" for a young married man with no children. Later, I had an early 3L V6 which was very fast, but didn't like cornering. I changed to a 2.8 V6 which was a delight to drive (by the standards of the time).

porch monkey
14th Apr 2014, 01:17
Try an escort with a 4.7l (289) V8, 850 Holley DP carb and a cam with lobes longer and taller than a 5 year old's hands. 9" diff and auto trans. Didn't go round corners that well, (didn't stop much either), but [email protected] me, frighteningly fast!!! Good thing we sold it....... Road registered too!!!

llondel
14th Apr 2014, 05:10
The thing about the Capri was that you could have the cheap 1.3L or the big 3L engine and at first glance they were both a Capri.

Motoring terms explained for Capri drivers:

Understeer: going through a hedge forwards.
Oversteer: going through a hedge backwards.
Neutral Steer: going through a hedge on your roof.

TOWTEAMBASE
14th Apr 2014, 06:01
I saw one the other day someone had made into a pick up (I sh1t you not). Think it has to be the RS2000 for me though, lovely looking motor :)

VP959
14th Apr 2014, 06:37
I once owned a Mk1 3 litre V6. Handled like a bollock on roller skates - just used to go straight on in corners, so bad was the understeer. It did perform impressive burnouts, though, and made a nice noise. Drank fuel like it was going out of fashion, though, so I swapped it for an a slightly more economical ex-police Granada 2.8i................

Shaggy Sheep Driver
14th Apr 2014, 09:02
I almost bought a 3 litre V6 Capri in 1982 when I changed jobs. In my previous job I'd had a Sirocco company car and it was so good I bought another Sirocco in my new job.

The Sirocco was far better car - more refined with infinitely better handling and looked good too (it was the Mk1 back then). But I still wish I'd gone for the big Ford, just for the experience!

Lon More
14th Apr 2014, 09:05
A German colleague had a 2.8 Capri, fettled by Zakspeed IIRC. Went round corners almost as well as my Elan S2. Was a lot faster on the straights though.

Jeff Uren used to do a series of conversions to the Capri, the Cortina, the Escort and the Transit. Top of the line was a 4.7l V8 in a 3litre shell; nothing was wasted as the bits progressed down the range. Dad had a 3 litre Cortina 'til I broke it.


A Capri pick-up demonstrating the handling

http://i1068.photobucket.com/albums/u457/pw171/Facebook/Mobile%20Uploads/261571_10150684862575175_4999111_n.jpg (http://s1068.photobucket.com/user/pw171/media/Facebook/Mobile%20Uploads/261571_10150684862575175_4999111_n.jpg.html)

and parked, which was probably safer

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v221/Infectus-Guy/CarStuff/Side1.jpg

Capetonian
14th Apr 2014, 09:09
My best cars were a couple of Escorts (1600GT and RS2000) and a Lotus Cortina.

I had, for a short while, a Capri 3000 (GT I think) which was, as someone said, a white trash car, I didn't keep it long, but I lived near Watford at the time so it was in keeping with the area! It also enabled me to pick up white trash chicks! It was quick in a straight line but lethal on corners, specially in the wet.

tartare
14th Apr 2014, 09:17
Went to an all boys high school in ChCh NZ.
One of the very tidy looking young blonde female teachers had a white V6 Capri.
Parked it in the quad alongside all the other old duffers Austin Allegros and Rovers.
She even used to wear tight black leather skirts from time to time.
Well fit lady in a well fit car.
Us lads couldn't quite work out what to drool over more...

603DX
14th Apr 2014, 09:19
I always thought the Capri was pants ... :E

Capri pants - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capri_pants)

SOPS
14th Apr 2014, 09:34
I am talking from an Australian perspective here...I have a mate who had one years ago. He discovered that the ( I think ) 4.7 litre V8 from the falcon would bolt straight in, with just some mods to the gear box. God it was fast, it was just stopping and going around corners that proved a bit of a challenge.:cool:

Tankertrashnav
14th Apr 2014, 09:48
When I went to uni in my 40s I bought myself a Capri and a leather jacket, as I thought I may as well do the mid-life crisis thing properly.

After 6 months of scaring myself shitless in the Capri, which must have had the worst road-holding of any car I have owned I flogged it and bought a Sierra, which was faster and handled far better.

Nevertheless I had many comments on why I had got rid of my "sporty" Capri, for a "staid" Sierra. All a matter of image.

gruntie
14th Apr 2014, 09:52
Way back in the (very) early 70s I saw one of the only two, genuine, factory-built Lotus Capris advertised in Expand and Fart. (Is that still published?)
I rushed for the phone, but it was gone.....sigh. What would it be worth now. Not that I had the money, anyway.

BOAC
14th Apr 2014, 09:56
I believe it was advertised at the time as

"The car you have always promised yourself"

which of course soon became

"The car you have always threatened yourself with":)

Capetonian
14th Apr 2014, 10:01
the Capri, which must have had the worst road-holding of any carYou never drove a Triumph Shitfire then!

Duckbutt
14th Apr 2014, 10:49
I started off with a Spitfire (1,147 cc's of throbbing power!) with the built in rear wheel tuck under, then a Mk11 Cortina 1600 GT before moving on to a 1600 Capri so got some insight on the handling of a car (or not as the case may be).

Looking back what with the combination of young driver and those cars I was somewhat fortunate not to kill myself or indeed anyone else. One endearing memory of the Capri was the alacrity it would change lanes on the motorway in a cross wind whether you wanted to or not - I once crossed the original Severn Bridge in a high wind and was somewhat ashen faced when I got to the other side. I hadn't taken on board just how much steering correction I was applying till I got into the shelter of the bridge towers and nearly hit the barriers on the side.

unstable load
14th Apr 2014, 10:50
Basil Green made it into a decent car....for a FORD, that is...:E
The Capri Perana V8 is unique in that it is the only V8 Ford Capri ever officially sanctioned by Ford. It was available from all South African Ford dealers with a full Ford warranty. Ford was closely involved and Capri Peranas were built as such at the Ford plant in Port Elizabeth and were shipped minus engines and gearboxes to Basil Green Motors where the manufacture was completed.
Capri Perana V8 :: Perana.org (http://www.perana.org/capriv8.asp)

MadsDad
14th Apr 2014, 11:41
Anyone else remember the four wheel drive rallycross version, driven by Roger Clark (and his brother Stan). I remember Roger commenting to the effect that it handled fine until it broke a driveshaft, after which it was totally undriveable (and it broke a driveshaft most races).

vulcanised
14th Apr 2014, 11:43
Never as good as the V8 Pilot. :eek:

parabellum
14th Apr 2014, 11:56
I seem to remember the Capri was an insurance nightmare! A policeman who spent his entire career in a patrol car said it was, at that time, probably the most dangerous car on the road! Didn't seem to effect sales though.

Out Of Trim
14th Apr 2014, 12:42
I don't think the Capri handled that badly, I never crashed mine in 5 years of ownership. It wasn't so great in the wet, being rear wheel drive and a bit light at the rear. Maybe, all the weight of my tool kit in those days helped in my case!

All of my cars since then, have been front wheel drive and probably a bit more forgiving! Still, once you get used to a car you just adapt to how it responds.

At least you could work on your car in those days.. You had to! I must have spent hours cleaning and adjusting or replacing the points. The cam belt failed once, luckily no damage caused and even changed the head gasket myself.

Too scared to look under the plastic engine cover now. No damn room to get your hands in anywhere. Dont know what many of the components are, with sensors everywhere. Mind you, not so much goes wrong these days. My last Audi ran to 215 thousand miles withought any strip down of the engine before I let it go.

radeng
14th Apr 2014, 13:56
The old joke...

How does an Essex girl turn the light on after sex?


Opens the door of the Capri.......

500N
14th Apr 2014, 14:15
Talking of crashes and Capri's.

The only crash my father had in his Series 2A L R was a Capri Driver
who came round a corner and didn't quite make it and smashed into
the Drivers side wheel area of the L R.

A fair bit of damage to the L R because he was going so fast but I was told that the front of the Capri was up by the windscreen which must have taken some effort.

Ancient Observer
14th Apr 2014, 14:24
When I had to give up my 1967 Lotus Elan, (much modded) I went for a 1600 GT Cortina. Much better than a Crapi.

When I had to give up my 1970 Lotus Elan, I went for a Hillman GT. Much better than a Ford.

Got so used to it, I upgraded to a Humber Sceptre.

dazdaz1
14th Apr 2014, 14:51
Back in the early 80s I had a 1600L Lucky for me it was from the German Ford production plant in Cologne (same right hand drive) better quality steel, one could tell a UK production Capri by the rusting bodywork via Ford Halewood production site. The German quality production steel was far superior than the steel Ford UK purchased from the Shotton steel works in Wales.

cockney steve
14th Apr 2014, 17:00
^^^^^^^ I always thought the Ghentand Cork -built cars rusted so badly because they used Acrylic paint systems, whereas Cologne used low-bake.

Alocal lad, who specialised in Sierra Cosworths, built a late Capri bodyshell from a couple of writeoffs and had it painted a very sober metallic grey....it had been modified to take full Cosworth mechanicals and was a fantastic "q-car" a real wolf in sheep's clothing.

Knew a guy with a V4 crapi which was written off twice by the insurance because of under-bonnet fires.....they refused fire cover thereafter.
once recovered a 3 litre Grandad which had been stood....gave it a bootful to avoid a flat-spot and the twinchoke (geared throttlejammed on full bore. had the presence of mind to turn the key "off" after finding Barry hadn't done the brakes properly :eek:
A Lada with a 2-litre twincam Fiat engine used to surprise a few, as well!.

Phalconphixer
14th Apr 2014, 17:23
A.O. When I had to give up my 1970 Lotus Elan, I went for a Hillman GT. Much better than a Ford.
Thread drift sorry!
Ah the trusty (?) Hunter GT… what a mixed blessing… we went from a bog standard Hillman Hunter 1500 to a 1725 Holbay race prepared and engined 1972 Hunter GT. The 0-60 time was down from 12 to about 10 seconds and the car was a guaranteed winner in any traffic lights grand prix. The original pocket rocket… beefed up suspension and brakes, a great car and my wife’s all-time favourite; (she had two speeds flat out and stop…)
The alloy head had been skimmed to within a micron of its life and to the point where anything less than 5 star petrol would leave it pinking like hell. It ate cylinder head gaskets like they were going out of fashion; we found out the reason eventually… the cover over the pushrods /cam followers was held in place by bolts into the block and into the head and over time the threads of the bolts in the head were breaking through the surface of the head leading to substantial water loss between the jacket and the No 1 and No 4 cylinders.
When we first got the car it still had the original twin Stromberg Carbs; balancing them was always a work of genius… my pet mechanic chucked away the calibration tools and tuned each carb by ear…
We had a couple of embarrassing experiences with the car; one, on a trip from deepest Essex down to Portsmouth one Christmas Eve. This was in the days before the M25. We stopped at a set of traffic lights down by Tower Bridge in London only to find that on attempting to pull away she was only firing on two cylinders and therefore going nowhere unless and until some remedial action was carried out. I knew from a little device that I had installed that the ignition / electrics were ok so it had to be fuel related… I called the RAC and eventually their rep turned up. After 30 minutes or so he too decided it was fuel related… couldn’t be the pump or filters because two pots were behaving perfectly. The problem became obvious when he removed the tops of the carbs to reveal the diaphragms lurking below… one of them had a half inch rip in it, so every time I tried to accelerate the pots fed by the offending carb were flooding out… The guy replaced the ruptured diaphragm, balanced off the carbs as best he could then pronounced us fit to travel… funnily enough the other carb failed on the way back a few days later…
The other embarrassment on this car concerned the fuel tank; unbeknown to most owners the tanks had been treated with some bituminous substance that the microbes and bacteria in petrol used as food… their attacks would leave particles and occasionally chunks of the material floating around inside the tank, just waiting to be drawn up by the fuel pump. A steady draw on the tank didn’t reveal any problems but heavy consumption used to lead to clogged fuel lines and filters. So on sitting, waiting for a set of traffic lights to change, the sudden demand for fuel would lead to an immediate engine stall from fuel starvation. Embarrassing to say the least. The only solution was a new tank taken from a later model, post 1974 I think…
Ultimately the Strombergs wore out and I replaced them with a pair of Weber DCOE’s with pancake air filters but this mod brought with it its own problems… the original Stroms were heated via a hose in the cooling system, something not catered for with the Webers so carb icing was a very real problem…
All in all I had a lot of fun with that car being of an age when youth and stupidity were on my side. Now a very staid 70 year old, I run an equally staid Renault Scenic 1.9Dci that has just cost me a small fortune, the equivalent of a couple of months of my RAF pension… on a new fuel pump and 4 new preheaters… Had to be a garage job… lifting the bonnet / hood on any modern car these days is like unlocking Pandora’s Box! There’s a lot to be said for the oldies… at least they were logical…

Windy Militant
14th Apr 2014, 18:39
big bruv traded a Honda 750 K1 and a Bitza Mini for a Vee four 2000 GT Capri which went well when it wasn't blowing head gaskets!
He traded it in after a couple of years for a K5 750 Honda.
Other bruv had a 1600GT mk 1 type 2 in white with a red pin stripe which he traded in for a 1975 1.6 JPS special which was a really nice car, but he had to sell it to put a deposit on a bungalow he was building after he got married.
Old man had a Capri 2.0 GXL which me and me mum put a replacement vinyl roof on for him, which came out surprisingly well. I think it was the fact that we did it during one of the hottest summers we'd had for a while so the vinyl was really soft and when we put it on it then shrunk tight, fortunately we didn't pull it too tight, unlike some others I've seen where the vinyl has pulled out of the trim when the weather got cold.

Hillman Hunters, my old man bought a Singer Vogue from a car dealer I later worked for.
In 1970 he was in the team that finished 15th* in the 1970 Mexico rally driving a Hillman Hunter. When I was working for him as a welder in 1985 a bloke turned up who had bought the actual car he had driven then, and was restoring it to the spec it was in when they drove it in the the rally.

*apparently only 23 cars finished the event!

angels
14th Apr 2014, 18:57
A bloke at school had a dad who ran a garage. His 17th birthday present was a Capri. He passed his test the same day having been tutored by daddy in the grounds of their Kent mansion.

After about two weeks he duly pranged it on the way to Westerham on the A25 whilst overtaking an artic on a bend. Luckily nothing was coming the other way, but the damage can still be seen on the side of the road near the Grasshopper (?), from whence he had recently exited!! :eek:

This was the 70s, so no charges were brought.

But quite a few plods were accepted for membership of the golf club that year......:rolleyes:

Fareastdriver
14th Apr 2014, 19:19
Mine was the last 2.8 Special. The next one was the first of the Brooklands so I had the last Capri with 13 inch wheels. 205/60 tyres plus power steering cured the over steer. Two 50k bags of dry sand, one by each suspension tower kept the rear wheels on the ground when going around corners.

The Capri never had the plastic wheel archs that prorect the insides of the wings so stones, mud and salt would wreak havoc underneath depite the undersealing. The old Ford front suspension mountings, the inside of the headlamp moulding and even the bonnet lip. Ten years, that all it took despite me babying it. Admittedly the wife crunched it twice.

Despite that I did 130,000 miles in twelve years. Stopped once, fuel pump, but when I sold it to a Capri Club member to start a new life the engine hadn't been touched except for servicing and it used no oil between changes.

G-CPTN
14th Apr 2014, 19:30
Ford Capri - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Capri)

Effluent Man
14th Apr 2014, 20:02
The best deal I ever did was on a Capri 1600XL MkII.I was working for an American oil company in Great Yarmouth and one of the Texans who was going home.He asked if I was interested in buying it.He asked 1600 and we had a deal at 1450.I went to the pay office to transfer the money into the account and the girl tapped on her calculator..."Nine hubdred and sixty five quid"...Divided by a common language Lloyd was talking the Yankee dollar!

aerobelly
14th Apr 2014, 20:58
Madsdad: "Anyone else remember the four wheel drive rallycross version, driven by Roger Clark"

Yup. they turned up at a Players No.6 event run by Dudley & District Car Club (at which event aerobelly had the honour -- and task-list -- of being a committee member). Bl**dy quick, until something broke. I think it was the final round of that year, somewhere near Lichfield IIRC. It was quite an honour for our club to host the final event of the year.

I don't have anything other than memories of that event -- too busy to be taking photos, and not competing myself so it didn't go into my diary ;-(

Another memory of that event says that Arnold Butcher came with his much-modified Lotus Mark Six, and was pretty damn quick to for basicly a
1953 car. Oh yes, there was Paul Kerridge with that yellow/green flock-coated Lotus Europa.


'b

Sop_Monkey
14th Apr 2014, 21:03
Coco

I thought I saw you waving a "banned" banner not so long ago. Seems now you have risen back to grace and been exonerated. Or have I got the wrong one?

500N
14th Apr 2014, 21:03
"I think it was the final round of that year, somewhere near Lichfield IIRC"

Would that have been at Sutton Coldfield ?

Isn't there a park there that used to host some rounds of a rally championship ?

At one of the park entrances on the road that goes up the hill from
the round about there is a huge Oak tree. Bloody bleak place in winter
to wait for a school bus :O

aerobelly
14th Apr 2014, 21:35
500N -- are you another Black Country kid?

Would that have been at Sutton Coldfield ?

No, north of there, just off the A38, but south of the A5. Consulting my library of O.S. maps Sheet 139 (price 65p) I think it may have been at Weeford SJ1301 -- but that's a bit of guesswork.

Isn't there a park there that used to host some rounds of a rally championship ?
Sutton Park certainly hosted the RAC Rally of GB at some times. That's a WRC event, or whatever it was called then. That was in the days when I was in a service-barge, but because it was for a local driver we would head for Wales or Scotland in the hope of getting a bit of sleep and leave Sutton Park to someone else nearby who couldn't do the five days of continuous on-the-road that the amateur full-time crew did.

Also on my list of service-crew recollections (but no written notes) is the Tour of Britain twice (for Phil Derbyshire's Dolly Sprint) where I think that James Hunt may have driven a Capri.


'b

500N
14th Apr 2014, 22:30
Born in Birmingham (the old hospital that was knocked down formthe Spaghetti Junction), lived in the village of Shenstone (near Lichhfield
- just off the ??? A5 ??? from memory). Schooled in Birmingham.

We have another Brummy on here, Bosnich. We both end up on the other
side of the world 5 kms from each other :O

fitliker
14th Apr 2014, 23:57
Drove a Capri Ghia from Aberdeen to Cornwall a few times ,nice comfy car with good sounds.
One of my old school pals bought a BRAND NEW John Player special edition with the money he got for involuntarily leaving a knee cap in Belfast. Nice car but I would rather have my kneecaps and take the bus :)

MG23
15th Apr 2014, 00:08
You never drove a Triumph Shitfire then!

A friend had a Spitfire, and it seemed to corner all right when I was following it along the road. OK, he did crash now and again, but it only ever cost a few quid to fix.

Capris were a favourite of the boy racers I worked with in my first job after university, but I don't think I ever actually travelled in one. I came from the Jaguar/Lancia/Alfa side of the tracks.

gileraguy
15th Apr 2014, 02:12
And the name is a palindrome for crapi...says it all really...

oldpax
15th Apr 2014, 03:32
I had two,my first was a MK 2 which my then wife kept trying to crash so sold it for a .....MK4 Cortina estate!!After my divorce and with few pennys to spend I bought an old MK1 from a guy called.....wait for it..Swindles!!!!Yes that was his name ,anyway I paid 300 quid for a 1973 MK1 .
I had this car for seven years and put in three engines at various times,it had a factory sunroof and drove OK .I had the 2000cc V4 engine (also used by the transit).All in all with body repairs and respray it cost in total 1300pounds!!I gave it to my youngest daughter who passed it on to a couple in Cornwall to restore further so it may still be around!!Had a friend in the Royal Marines and many repairs to bodywork were done on the base at Bickleigh!!!

llondel
15th Apr 2014, 05:34
Nevertheless I had many comments on why I had got rid of my "sporty" Capri, for a "staid" Sierra. All a matter of image.

I once raced a 2.0i sporty Sierra off a set of lights in the Bristol area. He ultimately won because there was a parked car in my lane, but I bet he wasn't expecting to be matched to that point. Back then we used to compare car specs at work and I happened to know that the 0-60 time of an XR2 was the same as the 2.0i Sierra, so it was worth putting that to the test.

bilby_qld
15th Apr 2014, 05:40
I drove a Capri back in my mis-spent youth in the UK; it was great in a straight line, but it cornered like a farm animal.

Krystal n chips
15th Apr 2014, 05:59
The car was a great favourite of GMP during the time of "Gods Cop"( who felt the population should all be in by bed no later than 22.00hrs and wear horse hair shirts etc.....) and they could indeed move...as seen on a regular basis as GMP's finest did their "Bodie and Doyle" impressions..... to impress the public.

Solid though the car may have been, unfortunately, in their dogged pursuit one day of, possibly nobody, the meeting of a steel bollard put in place to prevent just such use of a road over a weak bridge ended with a nice "V" in the bonnet and engine compartment.

The, in the main, law abiding locals gathered to view....and show their sympathy.....:D:E

Cacophonix
15th Apr 2014, 07:02
Coco

Sop_Monkey, he's is a clown and I am not sure about that Caco guy either?

;)

Caco

lasernigel
15th Apr 2014, 08:16
Bought mine when stationed in Bergen Hohne 1975. Guy at the QDG's had knocked down a cyclist whilst drunk. Resulting heavy fine and ban meant he had to sell it quickly. 9 months old, only damage was the wing, valance and headlamp. Kept meeting him in the NAAFI with Deutchmarks. Eventually got him down to 3500 Dm. Repaired and re sprayed damage as good as new.
Daytona yellow with a black roof. German 2 litre V6 Cologne engine in it.
Went well.

teeteringhead
15th Apr 2014, 08:37
When we first got the car it still had the original twin Stromberg Carbs; balancing them was always a work of genius… ... only TWO Strombergs???

One once had an XJ12 with FOUR Strombergs - had to take a week's leave to balance those b*ggers ....... :(

Lon More
15th Apr 2014, 08:41
A Lada with a 2-litre twincam Fiat engine used to surprise a few, as well!.
IIRC the lada engines were derived from FIAT ones so an easy swap.
One of the local farmers still drives around in a Niva. I think it's the mud and crud that holds it together. Except for an FC Landie must be the most uncomfortable vehicle I've ever driven. The Landie wins hands down; to be comfortable in that your feet would have been directly attatched to your knees

Putting a FIAT TC engine in a Lotus Elan was fairly straightforward, seen a few running round here in the past. Solved the problems with the water pump nicely.

. There was a friend of a friend who balanced my carbs by ear. He was a well known Dutch rally/race driver of the 1960s though his name escapes me now. He was a concert standard violinistwhich probably explains the ability.

There was a piece of kit called a Colortune ( a set of glass sparking plugs) for carb balancing. Still got one somewhere.

angels
15th Apr 2014, 09:29
And the name is a palindrome for crapi...says it all really...

No it aint! It's an anagram, yes, but not a palindrome!

Racecar is a palindrome.

it was great in a straight line, but it cornered like a farm animal.

bilby - yes, that's what my mate found out when he pranged. He ended up in what looked like a farm field as well.

ian16th
15th Apr 2014, 15:47
Duckie

I once crossed the original Severn Bridge in a high wind and was somewhat ashen faced when I got to the other side. I hadn't taken on board just how much steering correction I was applying till I got into the shelter of the bridge towers and nearly hit the barriers on the side. It happened to me in a Morris Minor 1000, it leapt sideways by about 6 feet :eek:

Effluent Man
15th Apr 2014, 15:58
Try driving one of the old rear engined VW vans.

ian16th
15th Apr 2014, 16:48
Lon_Mor

There was a piece of kit called a ColortuneBeen there, tried that and got the T-Shirt.

I used it on an Sunbeam Imp Sport, also with twin Stromburgs.

I was living in the Forest of Dean, great fun, till it started blowing head gaskets.

When Mrs 16th delived son I needed something larger, no dealers wanted the Imp Sport, but my local Rootes/Chrysler dealer had to. So I bought a Hunter.

RINKER
15th Apr 2014, 17:37
I had a 1984 2.8i and I really liked it. I never set out to buy one but at the time I had an Audi 200 turbo which had a lot of issues and the dealer who knew the story with my Audi did me a deal.
Anyway I had had two Granadas with the same engine and they were fine so the Capri had something familiar under the hood which seemed like a safe bet.
Terrible in the wet but fine in the dry. I liked the tall gearing and remember that it would clock 70 mph in 2nd gear which looked impressive to my passangers and it sounded great doing it.
Fond memories.

R

500N
15th Apr 2014, 17:41
Interesting how many times the Granada has been mentioned.

That was out families last car in the UK, 1978. We thought it was a big car and then came to Australia :rolleyes: where it would have been considered small engined.

Lon More
15th Apr 2014, 17:50
I used it on an Sunbeam Imp Sport, also with twin Stromburgs.
I had an Imp with Strombergs Resleevedstroked out to just under a litre. It chewed up gearboxes and clutches. It got so bad that I could actually change the clutch at the side of the road using my toolbox to take the weight of the engine then push the car forwards. Was doing this one day just outside Blackbushe when a guy stopped and started to undo the Battery. "If you're having the engine, I'm taking the battery." He required some persuasion to leave it in place, :=

Fareastdriver
15th Apr 2014, 18:31
till it started blowing head gaskets.

A problem with the Hillman Inp. It had a wet cylinder block and the head used to warp. On later cars there was a small tap beside the front mounted heater so you could let the air out of the system to make the heater work again. I cured the warping head on mine by stapling some production paper to a piece of kitchen top and exercising the head like a plane..

15 psi front and 30 psi on the back to encourage some understeer. The best thing in snow, ever, even better than a Beatle. We had half-a-mile of continuous 1 in 20 from the main road and the snow would drift between the hedges. I would open the rear window, the kids would sit on the back hanging onto the window stays and the rear snow tyres would take us up ever time. When the snow got more than a foot deep the front would rise and we would surf over it.

Had to bin it when the rear turrets rotted.

My next door neigbour had an expensive BMW 7 Series. A propshaft coupling went so he bought a new one. Coincidently I was changing a coupling on the Imp. They were identical even to the OEM part number. Mine cost £4.50, his £19.35

MadsDad
15th Apr 2014, 18:31
Aerobelly, sorry for late reply but been not looking.

Anyway you mention the flock-coated Lotus. As it happens Paul lived just up the road from me and I had cause to visit him. I hadn't seen the car but I recall him describing how it was very odd, sat at the start line of a hill-climb on the continent somewhere, and all the marshals kept coming up and stroking the car.

And, Lon, IFIRC the Lada was based on a Fiat shell/running gear but the engine was a copy of a BMW 2 litre lump.

Windy Militant
15th Apr 2014, 18:36
A problem with the Hillman Inp.(sic)
When I was an apprentice a lunch time project to skim an Imp head flat hit a bit of a snag. It was so warped we had to put it in a hydraulic press to to get it straight enough to re machine without the oil and water galleries being opened up. :ooh:

The Flying Pram
15th Apr 2014, 18:46
I was always a BMC person, so never owned a "Dagenham Dustbin", but have several memories. I was amazed at the amount of space under the bonnet of the basic 4 cylinder versions. If I remember correctly, there was a duct between the fan and the radiator, due to the distance between them. I also recall that the V6 Capris and Granadas had single, large, rectangular headlights - a fairly unusual fitment at the time. Since these vehicles were the transport of choice for traffic cops, the sight of a pair of those lights in the rear view mirror at night was always worrying!

Then there was the time I had gone down the city centre early one morning to try and get tickets to see the band "Sky". It was pretty quiet until the sound of a throaty V6 started getting louder. Moments later I was rather taken aback to see a Capri coming round the corner in a full opposite lock power-slide, before it disappeared through the market place in a cloud of tyre smoke...

Father had a V4 Corsair 2000E for time - It went like stink in a straight line, but the word "cornering" wasn't in its vocabulary until he fitted a set of Koni shocks. It was also utterly useless in the snow (even with some paving slabs in the boot), and he sold it an bought an Austin Maxi, which had the driving wheels underneath a bloody great cast iron lump, instead of at the other end. Now what were you lot saying about understeer???

I still have a Gunsons Colortune - I dug it out of the garage a couple of years back to set up the twin SU's on a friends MGB based kitcar .

A A Gruntpuddock
15th Apr 2014, 19:48
Re flock coating - I told a colleague about an exotic sports car seen outside one of the embassies in London which was lined with what looked like high quality sheepskin.

He came in late the next Monday having covered his Capri dashboard with sheepskin at the weekend.

Had been fine when first fitted, but the weekend was dull and Monday was bright sunshine.

Turned out that he had to drive slowly because he could hardly see the road for the reflection of the wool on the windscreen.!

vulcanised
15th Apr 2014, 19:52
That 2.8l straight six is probably the best engine Ford ever made.

G-CPTN
15th Apr 2014, 19:58
A colleague dealt in secondhand cars.

He acquired a black FHC E-type.

He asked me to drive it (whilst he drove another vehicle).

It was trimmed inside on all surfaces with long black 'fake fur'.

The experience was somewhat unusual . . .

ChrisVJ
15th Apr 2014, 20:18
500N

We had the same experience re the Granada, our last car in UK.

Got to Canada and our first car was a custom cruiser. It took a 4x8 sheet of plywood in the back and still only had six seats but I loved it. Back door opened either sideways or downwards, (wind the electric window down first!)

Suburbans and Yukons are even better. Got a YukonXL now.

500N
15th Apr 2014, 20:24
I think anyone who leaves the UK (and maybe Europe) and goes to the US or Aus / NZ finds the jump in size of the cars interesting, both in size and power, at least in the past.

A fair majority of cars over here in Aus were 3 - 5 ltr V6 or bigger with a lot of V8's where as from my memory most cars in the UK were 1 - 1.6 ltr and maybe a few 2 ltrs.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
15th Apr 2014, 20:29
I started off with a Spitfire (1,147 cc's of throbbing power!) with the built in rear wheel tuck under,

Ah, that was cured from the Mk1V on. I had two of those in succession (such was their propensity for rotting away) and on that model the rear axles' amount of downward travel was limited by a transverse leaf spring so you didn't get the dreaded 'tuck under'. With that and double wishbone front suspension the handling was pretty good for the time.

Before the Spits I'd had the worst car I'd ever driven - VW Beetle. Now that really DID suffer tuck-under and gave me some very nasty moments.

aerobelly
15th Apr 2014, 20:37
Anyway you mention the flock-coated Lotus. As it happens Paul lived just up the road from me and I had cause to visit him. I hadn't seen the car but I recall him describing how it was very odd, sat at the start line of a hill-climb on the continent somewhere, and all the marshals kept coming up and stroking the car.
Yes, it was like that. I remember debates in the pub about whether the finish would slow the car down. The conclusion (alcohol-fueled) was that at Autocross speeds it would not.

There are some pictures of the 4WD Capris in this debate: The Player's No. 6 Autocross series - Page 2 - The Nostalgia Forum - The AUTOSPORT Forums (http://forums.autosport.com/topic/77222-the-players-no-6-autocross-series/page-2)

...and I've come across more references to Weeford as an autocross venue, which surely must have been audible to you across the fields in Shenstone.
The event organised by D&DCC must have been 1972 or 1973. Actually I may have been newsletter editor at the time, but don't have any copies of the said organ -- not even the ones I wrote, typed and Roneo-printed in their entireity.

If there any Mini-Cooper S enthusiasts here (fat chance!) I have dug out photos of mine at Autocross events....


'b

Windy Militant
15th Apr 2014, 21:59
Cross over time again I knew a bloke who put a Ford Pinto block into a Mini. The carbs, twin 40 Webers K& N Filters poked into the drivers compartment throught a hole where the speedo used to live on "normal Minis"! Had a BDA head and a Hewland competion gearbox which spat it's main idler gear on the first rally he did with it. He then discovered a Maxi gearbox would fit straight onto the Pinto block. Surprisingly this combination lasted for several seasons until he gave up rallying.!

Metro man
15th Apr 2014, 22:39
The Granada was the car of choice for the Sweeney, real coppers.:ok:

G-CPTN
15th Apr 2014, 22:59
David Render had a FIAT 600 with a Ford Twincam engine in the back.
He gave me a ride - and it 'flew'!

TBirdFrank
15th Apr 2014, 23:05
What's all this "had"

Went to the pub last night where my mate Steve was doing the presentation.

Outside was his trusty yellow Capri - rebodied once - but still going well!

fltlt
16th Apr 2014, 01:42
The first batch of 3 liter GT Capri's suffered from a horrible thumping from the front end and the sensation of riding down a cobble street at speeds above 85-90 mph.
When you rode alongside one you could actually see the front tyres become egg shaped as the tread separated from the carcass.
Ford very quickly and quietly had the owners come in for new tyres.
Yes the German built Capri's were better quality although I personally preferred the Wessex engine to the narrow V Taurus.
Anyone here remember following Escorts down the motorway only to be showered in paint flakes as the top layer of paint had not keyed to the primer.
Started around the front indicators and forward edge of the roof.
Downton Engineering, sounds sort of right to an old memory, did indeed build a transmission case for the MINI that bolted to the Ford 6015 series block which could be anything from a mild 1498 to a BDA.
If anyone is familiar with the old go kart track at Longridge then you would have seen MINI's with 14 inch rims that when gearing down for the hairpin would raise both rear wheels off the ground. 8 port heads, split 40 DCOE's, all the good stuff. Its now a caravan park.
Castrol R perfume.

Pinky the pilot
16th Apr 2014, 05:15
Back in the mid to late 70's when the Bathurst Car Race here in Australia was a series production race a team called IIRC, Masterson Homes, used to field a pair of 3lit V6 GT Capris and would regularly win their class.

This was until a bloke by the name of Peter Williamson came along with a 2litre DOHC Toyota Celica and once he sorted the car, used to not only win his class but would beat the Capris as well!:eek:

Still remember the introduction of the 'race cam' at one Bathurst race when it was put into Willos Celica and hearing him say, half way down Conrod straight that '...now doing 137mph. Not bad for a four cylinder, eh?':ooh:
And the engine was pulling 8,000rpm.

500N
16th Apr 2014, 05:19
From what I hear, that was what set the Toyota Celica off on it's wild sales ride and the Corolla followed it - being just a damn good small, solid car.
It was a very popular car by the time I got here in 1978.

I reckon a fair majority of families in Oz had a Toyota Corolla passed down
through the family ;)

Lon More
16th Apr 2014, 06:55
They were identical even to the OEM part number. Mine cost £4.50, his £19.35
I used them on the Elan, even bigger difference in price!!
There was a description in the IMP workshop maual on making a tool to clamp the rubbers whilst replacing them.

MadsDad
16th Apr 2014, 08:44
Aero, I used to have a Cooper 'S', 1340 'bored' variant. Went tolerably well. (Although the quickest car I ever had was a Mk 1 Cortina GT 'Q' car - it had rust holes in the wings and an Alan Mann tuned Lotus engine).

I also remember one of the local autocross competitors (don't remember his name now) who put a Ford 1600 BDA into his autocross mini - apparently it just dropped onto the mini gearbox, didn't need to do any fettling on the engine mounts.

angels
16th Apr 2014, 13:10
Metro Man - Thank you for reminding me of the classic quote --

"We're The Sweeney, and we've not had breakfast!" :}

fltlt
16th Apr 2014, 14:49
LM

After someone saw the BMW doughnuts came with a steel band around them (whoever it was that decided that, thank you) then everyone finally followed suit.
Can't begin to describe the utter frustration of using multiple hose clamps to wrestle the 6 holes to line up.

G-CPTN
16th Apr 2014, 14:58
Some folk left the steel band in place after fitting . . .

Gordon17
16th Apr 2014, 15:46
Metro Man - Thank you for reminding me of the classic quote --

"We're The Sweeney, and we've not had breakfast!"

Call me Mr Pedantic, but I believe that it was -

"We're The Sweeney, son, and we haven't had any dinner."

Fareastdriver
16th Apr 2014, 16:46
The same neighbour, and the same 700 Series Beamer had a clonking noise coming out of the rear axle when backing out of the garage. but ther was no trouble going forward. He went to the local BMW dealers and they told him that it needed a new differential unit; about £750 plus fitting. This was around 1980.

Somewhat miffed he asked my advice. I said that we could pull the rear plate off and see what the problem was and if it was knackered than back to BMWs.
Out came my tools, stands plus the rest. I drained the oil and unscrewed the backplate. It was blindingly obvious as soon as it came off.

The crownwheel retaining screws had come loose, all of them. The noise was the crownwheel scraping against the case. The reason it was quiet going forward it that helical crownwheel and pinion assemblies are designed to that in forward drive the crownwheel is pulled into the pinion, and vice versa, which is why a lot of axles growl when reversing.

I decided not to just crank them up to 120 ft/lbs and leave it. I changed the 14mm. screws for aviation quality with locking wire holes. When tight I spun then up never to come loose again.

The rear axle had not been touched from new so the problem had started in the BMW factory.

G-CPTN
16th Apr 2014, 17:46
I have several horror stories about 'from new' vehicle faults.

One vehicle released without any oil in the rear axle - just the yellow ochre used to check the tooth-engagement - got a couple of miles before the axle went noisy.

Another rear axle where the metal oil-slinger plate detached from the spot-welds on the rear cover and the plate passed between the gears and became 'formed' with the gear tooth profile.

Several new vehicles with strange lumps on the body cill - due to filler applied to dents made by fork-lift mishandling. The refinishers got tired of sanding-down the filler (or ran out of station time) and the bodies were painted over the lumpy filler.

DType
16th Apr 2014, 18:04
Wife had a Stiletto many years ago, the engine was so sweet I had to fit an Elan rev limiter. The pensioned off push chair was an ideal engine trolley, and you could lift the lump single handed.
Best trick (pre-universal speed limits) was to slipstream Jags etc, then pull out as though to overtake - really rattled them!!
With lowered suspension (back to where it should have started), it handled like a go-kart.
Plenty fun per buck!

aerobelly
16th Apr 2014, 19:17
Madsdad I also remember one of the local autocross competitors (don't remember his name now) who put a Ford 1600 BDA into his autocross mini - apparently it just dropped onto the mini gearbox, didn't need to do any fettling on the engine mounts.

A friend of mine built a Mini with half a BDA in it -- for the 850 class. Pics here: Ford Bda, Lotus Twin Cam Mini. - Page 2 - Mini Chat - The Mini Forum (http://www.theminiforum.co.uk/forums/topic/192098-ford-bda-lotus-twin-cam-mini/page-2)

I think he's still got the engine somewhere in his workshop, where he now builds Yamaha OW01s for historic WSB racing.


'b

GrumpyOldFart
16th Apr 2014, 19:19
My fondest memory of a Capri was of the one driven by Jochen Mass in the '73 ETCC Silverstone round. Lap after lap after lap, he and Dieter Quester (BMW) alternated for the lead, until the latter ran out of fuel just a few laps before the finish. Far and away the most thrilling race I ever watched.

There may have been other cars on the track at the time, but I really don't know. I didn't see them.

fltlt
16th Apr 2014, 19:25
Used to do power boat week up at Windermere.
Pickle Fork class had a tuned Imp engine driving props that looked twisted knives.
The idiot, for want of a better word, lay prone with his legs either side of the engine, his head behind a curved piece of plexiglass.
The thing did not float, it required forward movement to stay up, so the pit crew (his mates) started it with him on it. They then picked it and him up, waded a couple of feet into the water and launched (chucked) the whole ensemble.
Damn thing either took off like a rocket or stalled and promptly sank.
Through the radar trap on the lake they were nudging 90 mph.
Fascinating to watch though, turning circle of the Queen Mary.

llondel
17th Apr 2014, 03:50
I think anyone who leaves the UK (and maybe Europe) and goes to the US or Aus / NZ finds the jump in size of the cars interesting, both in size and power, at least in the past.

Except in California, where they strangle them because of the daft emissions laws, failing to realise that making the car use 10% more fuel is going to result in 10% more CO2. My current car is the biggest and supposedly most powerful car I've ever driven and yet I reckon my old 1.4Si Fiesta would still beat it and handle better.

What is it about tyres in the US? Do they still use cross-ply (or bias belt)? The grip seems to be dire, or is that just the road surface is poorer.

MG23
17th Apr 2014, 18:06
My current car is the biggest and supposedly most powerful car I've ever driven and yet I reckon my old 1.4Si Fiesta would still beat it and handle better.

A lot of it is due to safety regulations that make cars heavier, but the improvements in engine technology mean they're still getting better performance per litre and better fuel consumption for that performance.

Our 1.8 Civic is heavier and more powerful than my old two-litre supercharged Lancia, performs about the same, but averages 32mpg rather than 22mpg. I've been looking at the new Subaru WRX to replace my girlfriend's old Buick motorized sofa, and that performs about the same as a 1980s Ferrari, but gets about 50% better mpg.

What is it about tyres in the US? Do they still use cross-ply (or bias belt)? The grip seems to be dire, or is that just the road surface is poorer.

Most US roads I've driven on go tens of miles between bends, so cornering ability doesn't matter much compared to the UK. I'd hate to try driving the Buick down some Cornish back road, but it's fine when you only have to turn the steering wheel a few degrees every half hour.

ian16th
18th Apr 2014, 10:17
G-CPTN

I have several horror stories about 'from new' vehicle faults.
This could be worth a thread on its own.

One I know of, from the wife of a guy that I worked with. She worked in the office of a Triumph dealer in Leeds. Circa 1974.

A Triumph Toledo, having had its pre-delivery check done, was in the showroom being cleaned for delivery to the proud new owner.

The cleaner was vacuuming the interior, through the off side rear door and in those pre-central locking days, she leant across the rear seat to unlock the nearside rear door.

She couldn't find the interior door handle!

She walked around to the other side of the car to find that on the nearside it was a 2-door Toledo!

This was apparently the only recorded 3-door Toledo. But not a hatchback. It was a 2 door on the nearside and a 4 door on the offside.

The dealer wanted to keep the car as a novelty, but the factory insisted on it being returned. I dunno what they did with it.

G-CPTN
18th Apr 2014, 10:31
A lesser example was a car with 4-stud wheels on one side and five-stud wheels on the other.

4-stud wheels were 13 inch diameter, 5-stud were 14 inch diameter.

Capetonian
18th Apr 2014, 10:37
I believe that a batch of BMWs left the factory and were delivered to dealers with no reverse gear.

ian16th
18th Apr 2014, 10:47
A lesser example was a car with 4-stud wheels on one side and five-stud wheels on the other.

4-stud wheels were 13 inch diameter, 5-stud were 14 inch diameter.

Were there 2 spares in the boot? :sad:

MadsDad
18th Apr 2014, 11:19
Read about a BMC 1100 that had been built with one drum brake and one disc brake on the front. Would have made the handling interesting under hard braking I suspect.

AtomKraft
18th Apr 2014, 14:16
Back when I flogged Volvos for a living, we had a new 360 - that's the 2 litre version of the 340, that just refused to run properly.
It was ok when cold, but as it warmed up it ran worse and worse.

Nobody could figure out the problem and many components were swapped out without improvement. Our customer was mightily inconvenienced and generally fed up after many visits to the dealership.

Finally the decision was taken to put in a new engine.
During the work, the inlet manifold was removed and a sharp eyed 'mechanic' noticed a core plug fitted in one of the holes in the cylinder head used to circulate water through the 'water cooled inlet manifold' as he described it....:ugh:
In fact the manifold is water heated, and lack of flow through it was our problem.

MadsDad
18th Apr 2014, 14:52
Another one I forgot to mention earlier. Mate had a Sierra which just wouldn't run right - was a 2 litre GT but was slower (acceleration and top) than his previous similar vehicle. Anyway he complained mightily and the car was checked many times, over the course of a year or so. Then someone, somewhere, had a bright idea ('ting') and checked the diff - the car had had the wrong diff installed, much taller than the one it should have had. So, no go and the speed shown was nowhere near the actual true speed.

Fareastdriver
18th Apr 2014, 15:21
It was a 2 door on the nearside and a 4 door on the offside.

A mate of mine had an MGA. He punched a hole in the scenery via a hedge and as it went over the base it broke it's back. He was guided, by peoplr who know about these things, to a scrapyard that used to get all of Pressed Steel's rejects. P.S. used to supply all the bodyshells for BMC at Oxford.

These were the days of piecework. It didn't matter what they looked like, it was the numbers that counted. The yard had piles of disfigured assemblies, three doors were ten a penny. There was a batch there where the was a foreign object in the roof panel press and they watched about thirty of them go through before they did any thing about it.

My mate got an MGA shell, slightly rusty because it hadn't been primed. The near side headlight aperture hadn't been pressed out.