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View Full Version : I would happily pay a pound extra for a pint


ExRAFRadar
2nd Apr 2014, 12:03
If the pub banned kids of any age....

Some of our locals have turned into bloody creches.

Vercingetorix
2nd Apr 2014, 12:05
abso fcuking lutely

Cacophonix
2nd Apr 2014, 12:09
Your proposal gets my vote.

Caco

superq7
2nd Apr 2014, 12:18
We have a small childrens room in our pub for the Yummie Mummies and their ankle biters, works a treat.

Flight_Idle
2nd Apr 2014, 12:21
Same with restaurants, people would like to dine without screeching kids running around.


I'm seriously considering taking my idea to the dragons den...


Perspex 'Kid pods' with an evacuated interspace to make them soundproof. There would of course be an oxygen supply & feeding tubes, maybe with earphones so the parents can listen to their little darlings, without annoying other diners/drinkers.

Capetonian
2nd Apr 2014, 12:28
So would I, but I have absolutely no idea how much a pint costs. It's like fuel, bread, milk, it's a need purchase and as such the price is irrelevant.

Lightning Mate
2nd Apr 2014, 12:32
I wonder what would happen if a landlord erected a sign outside his pub stating NO CHILDREN ALLOWED.


I bet someone would take him to court for discrimination.

ExRAFRadar
2nd Apr 2014, 12:34
Thank God I am not alone.

Sunday lunch in a pub on the river in Twickenham a bloke stood at the bar while his baby, who must have been all of 2 months old, cried it's eyes out.

I was so close to saying something but this inner voice said I was being irrational.

Was I wrong to just put up with it ?

And don't say 'Go to another pub' they are all the same.

When I was taken into a pub as a nipper we sat with our parents and didn't say a word. Or at least we were not allowed to run around. I know people say its because smoking was allowed inside back then and there was a danger of getting a ciggy stuck in your eye.

But I know different, its because our Parents had been bought up not to assume everything is a birthright, including the right to let your brat(s) spoil my lunchtime pint.

Want to spend time with the kids, go to a park with a picnic.

Private jet
2nd Apr 2014, 12:36
To be honest I gave up going to "ale houses" several years ago, and not just due to the aggro from peoples "little darlings". A lot of the adults are just as loathsome. The lonely, the boring, the "political commentators", the "benefits boozers" the "loud louts", the "wide boys", the pub "experts" and the "beer & bulls**t" brigade. All to be found in your local pub.

Cacophonix
2nd Apr 2014, 12:37
Pubs are not places conducive to a child's development and therefore taking a child into such places may represent a form of child cruelty methinks... ;)

Caco

SpringHeeledJack
2nd Apr 2014, 12:40
The problem lies with the ever increasing mentality of entitlement, in this case despite a change in life circumstances (hopefully happy!) the social life of before is non-negotiable and thus children are brought to what is mostly an adult environment. Add in the entitlement of having 'me time' and the children are often unsupervised and not kept in check. Result ? Disgruntled customers who then visit less often. Children are great, lots of energy and curiosity, but there are plenty of places that it would be wiser to not visit with them.



SHJ

waldopepper42
2nd Apr 2014, 12:55
I'd extend theban to all public places. Most especially airports and airliners. Children should NEVER be allowed on any form of public transport!!!!! :E

awblain
2nd Apr 2014, 12:59
Waldo, are you sure that's wise?

Do we really need more distracted drivers of needlessly oversized SUVs and minivans careening about?

waldopepper42
2nd Apr 2014, 13:22
Ahhhh Good point awblain. Obviously didn't think this through.

Children should never be allowed on ANY form of transport.

Or in public....... :E

MagnusP
2nd Apr 2014, 14:20
Children should be raised on the bunghole principle. Keep 'em in a barrel and feed them through the bunghole. When they turn 16, insert the bung.

To stay on-topic (HAH! On JB?), I'd pay a pound extra if certain barmaids were nekkid.

Limeygal
2nd Apr 2014, 14:46
As my old mum used to tell us ad nauseum, children should be seen and not heard. I don't do children, so I like Waldo's idea. Big thumbs up!

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 14:51
MagnusP:

You wrote about nekkid barmaids on purpose, didn't you? Because you just knew I'd come back with a pictorial representation of the same. didn't you?
Well, I'm not rising to your bait, so there!

http://unclerooney.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/hooters2.jpg

Okay, I lied. So shoot me! Although she isn't "nekkid" she is blond-haired, blue-eyed, big-boobed and probably stupider than a brick. Can't get any better than that, eh?!!!!!!!

TBirdFrank
2nd Apr 2014, 14:53
Yer miserable old farts!

Were you never kids yourselves? Did your parents never take you out?

Never seen kids in a pub of an evening unless its one of those dining pubs, but they don't count.

Walked out of many a pub at lunchtime, when the kids were younger - you don't feed my kids - you don't get my money - simples!

You want a ruined ambience - try the 20.35 first class section York to Doncaster last Saturday night - simply appalling - and none of them under thirty!

MagnusP
2nd Apr 2014, 14:54
Shoot you? Nah; I'll buy the first beers if we ever meet up in the Santa Monica outlet (my favourite), or the original in Clearwater.

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 14:57
TBirdFrank wrote:

Yer miserable old farts!

Thank you! I thoroughly enjoy being a miserable and cantankerous old fart.

Were you never kids yourselves? Did your parents never take you out?

I went to Catholic school for 10 years. So much for being a kid.

And when my parents went out they locked me in a closet until such time as they returned. I was allowed one (1) 5W light bulb in the closet.
I blame my parents for all my mental deficiencies. Which also may explain why, as a kid, my favorite past time was taking a magnifying glass to unsuspecting ants and frying them 'til they were crispy. I blame them for this. :}

PS: Brats, of any age, do not belong in a bar/pub.

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 14:59
Magnus:

The "outlets" in Santa Monica and Clearwater may be fine and dandy but there is in outlet in Hauppauge, Long Island, NY which puts all others to shame. Whenever I pop into that outlet I have a very difficult time trying to behave myself. :ok:

MagnusP
2nd Apr 2014, 15:05
Thank you, RGB, it's now on the list. Oddly enough, MrsP has been agitiating for a break in NY. I may just acquiesce.

The tally so far:
Clearwater
Orlando
Tucson (both)
Santa Monica
Honolulu

I know; must try harder. :ok:

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 15:07
Magnus:

Mrs. P must be a very discerning lady to agitate for a break to NY!!!! :}

If you ever make plans to come this way give me a shout and we will get together. Sans the respective Mrs. of course!!!! :mad:

vulcanised
2nd Apr 2014, 15:19
Kids shouldn't be allowed in supermarkets either!

Tie them up outside with the dogs. Even better, let the dogs in.

MagnusP
2nd Apr 2014, 15:29
RGB: Theatres, Bloomingdales and Saks; possible Nieman Marcus. That's my destiny should we get there. Oh, how I thrill at the thought. :sad:

There are, however, a few damn fine guitar stores . . .

Lon More
2nd Apr 2014, 15:34
Right, that's the kids solved. Now can we get rid of the dogs. Nothing worse than the stink of wet dog in a warm pub. Puts me right off my ale.


PS Nothing against the smell of wet pussy though

sitigeltfel
2nd Apr 2014, 15:35
I wonder what would happen if a landlord erected a sign outside his pub stating NO CHILDREN ALLOWED.

I bet someone would take him to court for discrimination.

The Landlord could always try, NO CHILDREN, ALOUD.

Octopussy2
2nd Apr 2014, 15:49
Actually, there's nothing to prevent pubs, bars or restaurants (in the UK) from excluding children. So publicans can if they want to.

Usually it's self-selecting, though, isn't it? When I lived in London, the only pub I would take my children into would be a gastropub type of establishment, for a meal. Places like that are generally set up for, and welcome, children (well-behaved ones preferred, obviously).

I wouldn't dream of taking the children into an sticky-carpet, old men's type pub (and probably wouldn't go myself). That would just be inappropriate - why would you?

So really we're talking about two separate markets, no?

And there's clearly a market for childfree holidays - I'm thinking of those UK TV ads for the Warner holidays, which are adult-only (not in the 18-30 or Hooters sense!)

DX Wombat
2nd Apr 2014, 16:08
I agree that badly behaved children are a blot on the landscape and they and their parents should be asked to leave. On the subject of dogs in pubs there is a great website Doggie Pubs (http://www.doggiepubs.org.uk/index.php?48=on#listing) which I use when I'm travelling or on holiday with the dogs as I have no wish to leave them to die in a boiling hot car on a motorway service station or elsewhere whilst I eat. The dogs have been brought up to behave themselves in public to the extent that not too long ago one older lady in a pub didn't even realise they were still there until she saw me paying my bill and asked her daughter when the dogs had left. We had been sitting behind her. :) It was the same when my OzNieces and nephew were small - they were never allowed to run amok in shopping centres, supermarkets, cafe's restaurants etc - "This is a supermarket NOT a playground" being a favourite reminder from a parent or accompanying relative.

G-CPTN
2nd Apr 2014, 16:12
Until relatively recently (a couple of decades - maybe more) alehouses were not allowed to have anyone underage in a bar where intoxicating drinks were served.
Anyone underage had to be kept in a separate room (to which the adults could retire with their drinks and join their offspring). Even unaccompanied 'teenagers' were required to be in the 'unlicensed' room(s).

I know this because this is the environment in which I grew up.

Then there was a weakening when those (teenagers) were allowed to enter the bar (or, more usually, the 'Lounge') provided they didn't buy or consume alcoholic drinks - cue the popularity of bitter lemon and dry ginger 'mixers' as drinks for the youngsters (there may have been others such as Babycham and Pink Lady, but those might have been alcoholic).

Landlords still had the right (and usually enforced it) to prohibit youngsters from the 'bar' - after all, pubs were not family environments as drink was pernicious.

Meanwhile, (some) pubs have had to realise that they cannot survive on the sale of beer and spirits (from men) alone and we started to get 'chicken in a basket' to please the ladies whilst the men stood at the bar and chewed the fat.

Allowing children in was the final decision, but, to be fair, the problem isn't children - it is badly behaved children that the parents allow to misbehave without being controlled.

Over the years there has evolved an attitude of parents that their children can 'do anything' and "who is going to stop them?" as you would discover if you asked the parents to control their offspring.

Of course now we have had a generation of these uncontrolled children who, themselves have procreated and now have misbehaving children and they see it as their right to be able to do just as they please - dropping litter and being foul-mouthed.

Don't blame the children - it is the parents who should behave better . . .

Properly brought-up children are fit to enter anywhere (except, perhaps a brothel or a drug den).

It's the parents - blame the parents!

Shaggy Sheep Driver
2nd Apr 2014, 16:25
Outlet? This is an outlet, isn't it?

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b132/GZK6NK/outlet_zpsb7cd2cc0.jpg (http://s18.photobucket.com/user/GZK6NK/media/outlet_zpsb7cd2cc0.jpg.html)

I'd rather see well behaved kids in a pub than dogs in a pub any day.

con-pilot
2nd Apr 2014, 17:19
In the city I live in, there are these things called 'Sport's Bars". Which strangely enough, many of these "Sport's Bars" have little or nothing ot do with "Sports".

However, these Sport's Bars must sell at least 51% booze and no more than 49% food. One can (GASP!!!!) smoke in these bars, if allowed by the owner and no one under 21 can be admitted.

Problem solved.

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 17:33
One can (GASP!!!!) smoke in these bars, if allowed by the owner

WTF? :eek: Holy mackerel, being allowed to smoke in a bar? How.. how.... how... irreverent. How... how... how despicable. Don't these bar owners know that by allowing smoking in their bars they are not at all taking into consideration the health of those who don't smoke i.e., via second-hand smoke. What a bunch of losers these bar owners are.

hey con? I think I might be moving to your area soon!!!

Right, well back to work. No, on second thought I think I'm going to go outside and have a smoke first. :ok:

BenThere
2nd Apr 2014, 18:14
.Actually the Constitution would support any state allowing smoking in bars, EPA be damned. It also would support any state prohibiting smoking in bars. It shouldn't be a federal issue

I'd like to see one state, Wyoming, maybe, declare that the owner of an establishment is entitled to set smoking policy. That's the state where I'd want to live.

Along the same line, Colorado's pot election, though I would have voted against it, demonstrates how the federal system is supposed to work. We can now, in the rest of the states, watch Colorado, see how it turns out, and either emulate or reject what they did.

goudie
2nd Apr 2014, 19:51
While we're on the subject of banning kids, what happened to 'men only bars'?

500N
2nd Apr 2014, 19:56
it isn't something that I contemplate since I don't have kids
but a mate and I are planning a trip out with the better halves
and he said they normally go to a pub with a kids area, put the
kid in when they arrive and pick him up when they leave.

Sounds perfect to me considering I have about a 2 hour
tolerance of kids !

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 20:06
500N wrote:

Sounds perfect to me considering I have about a 2 hour
tolerance of kids !

http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100704194844/christmasspecials/images/6/61/Scrooge-carrey.jpg

500N aka The Miserable Bastard! :}

500N
2nd Apr 2014, 20:09
Now come on RGB, that's a bit unfair !

If you keep going, my feelings might get hurt :O

I think when you were a kid, you needed a few more good canings
as I am sure you weren't a good boy all the time ;) :O

airship
2nd Apr 2014, 20:13
A pound as in "The Merchant of Venice"?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/52/Merchant_venice_tp.jpg

A pound extra even...?! :}

Do as I do, not as I say: "Buy your booze as cheaply as possible. And drink alone at home...?! :ok: :confused: :{

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 20:17
500N wrote:

I think when you were a kid, you needed a few more good canings
as I am sure you weren't a good boy all the time

Ahem, I did go to Catholic school for 10 years so the "canings" were an Opus unto themselves. Opus Maximus was more like it.

http://dreamshadow59.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/mean-nun.jpg

"Come here my little pretty. Let me learn you."

500N
2nd Apr 2014, 20:23
I didn't go to a Catholic school but caused my Housemaster enough consternation that I was called into his study at least once a week
and got the cane regularly. So much so I think he actually gave up as he realised it wasn't going to work !!!

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 20:30
Lucky you, 500N. Nuns, unfortunately, don't give up. Never. Unless, of course, you cry "uncle" when getting the living shit beat out of you. Then they might give it a rest. For a little while anyway.

500N
2nd Apr 2014, 20:43
I never gave him the satisfaction of crying "Uncle" !

I just gritted my teeth and counted them off and tried not to think of the pain !

I think it is why you and I both ended up like we did, doing what we did :ok:

rgbrock1
2nd Apr 2014, 20:48
500N wrote

I think it is why you and I both ended up like we did, doing what we did

Yup, sure is. Every time I sighted down the barrel of my rifle I imagined the target as a nun. Probably one of the reasons I always shot "expert" during qualifications! :}

Gertrude the Wombat
2nd Apr 2014, 21:20
And don't say 'Go to another pub' they are all the same.
Market forces, innit.

If you want to start a pub which bans children there's nobody stopping you. Do let us know how you get on.

Andy_P
2nd Apr 2014, 22:14
Our local pub does not allow kids in the public bar!!!

But you can add me to the list of kid haters.

tony draper
2nd Apr 2014, 22:29
The pubs I remember they didn't allow anybody under eighteen in,the kids had to wait outside with the wife when dad went in for a couple of pints and a game of darts with the lads.
:E

Tankertrashnav
2nd Apr 2014, 22:57
While we're on the subject of banning kids, what happened to 'men only bars'?


When I was living in Exeter, the "right-on" licensee of a pub (not a club) introduced "women only" evenings when men weren't admitted.

I was pretty sure that was illegal, as I am sure that being male is not a valid reason to be refused admittance to a public bar. I was always going to try and get in on women's night, but somehow never got round to it. Would have been fun, though.

defizr
2nd Apr 2014, 23:24
Our local is willing to serve meals to yoofs accompanied by their parents up until 2100 hours. After that if you're under 18 you're out the door. Fabulous!

con-pilot
2nd Apr 2014, 23:31
Do let us know how you get on.

The 'Sport's Bars' here, smoking allowed by owner's discretion, no one under 21 admitted, do quite well thank you. :ok:

I know, more of that freedom of choice thing you seem to have so much trouble with.

Flight_Idle
3rd Apr 2014, 00:13
Kids are no longer taught to sit to attention & eat their food in silence. The parents often preferring their noisy offspring to play 'Hide & seek' under the tables of diners at the far end of the pub.


An adjoining soundproof room, where children, dogs & other assorted pets could be fed, would be a great idea. When dining, I do not want to listen to loud punk rock, pinball machines, or other peoples children.

ricardian
3rd Apr 2014, 00:18
Kids are not even taught how to handle cutlery - watching youngsters handle knives and forks is quite distressing!

MFC_Fly
3rd Apr 2014, 05:30
Magnus, another one for your list...

Just under short finals runway 09 at MIA (corner of NW 87th Ave and NW 13th Ter). Excellent selection if you like stunning Latino's :ok:

MFC_Fly
3rd Apr 2014, 05:35
An adjoining soundproof room, where children, dogs & other assorted pets could be fed, would be a great idea.
I think you need to change that to "An adjoining soundproof room, where children could be fed to dogs & other assorted pets, would be a great idea." :E

sitigeltfel
3rd Apr 2014, 06:45
Kids are not even taught how to handle cutlery - watching youngsters handle knives and forks is quite distressing!

A diet of Pizzas, Burgers and Chips removes the need for such utensils.

Pinky the pilot
3rd Apr 2014, 07:50
watching youngsters handle knives and forks is quite distressing!

Over thirty years ago a few of my friends and I who were all members of a Gliding club would drive to a pub in a town about 25km away from the field.

The Dining room of the Pub was always well patronised on Saturday nights and there was a prominent sign on the wall which stated that Children were to remain seated at all times.:ok:

This sign was put up shortly after one of our group had the experience of a knife sail past his leg and hitting a nearby wall. It was thrown by an out of control brat from another table.:mad:

Said brat and its parents were quietly spoken to by the Publican, and left shortly afterwards.:=

Mac the Knife
3rd Apr 2014, 08:24
I dunno - when I was a lad pubs were pubs, there was a Saloon Bar, a Public Bar and sometimes a Ladies Bar. The air was blue, dogs were allowed but no-one under 16.

There was no telly, no jukeboxes and no fruit machines - people talked or read the paper or contemplated their glass.

The beer was better too (and a lot cheaper)

Time Gentlemen please!

Mac (nostalgic ol' fart)

papershuffler
3rd Apr 2014, 08:28
Out for a ride with friends last week, we stopped at a cafe for cake and coffee/tea/whatever. So many kids running around, under no control whatsoever.

As we were leaving, one ran across my cycling-boot-clad size 8s, managed to send herself flying.

Instant :{and screams as I closed the door behind me.:E


Oh, and I agree about the cutlery comment. Bloody disgrace. If you do anything for your children, make sure they can eat properly, and I don't have to see them stabbing their food and masticating. Yuck.

MagnusP
3rd Apr 2014, 08:29
Thanks, MFC Fly, but I prefer stunning Latinas! :p

Captivep
3rd Apr 2014, 09:26
It seems to me that many parents literally cannot hear their own children screaming or running around in a pub/restaurant. It's a form of selective deafness!

sitigeltfel
3rd Apr 2014, 10:02
Dad owned a hotel with a couple of bars, and I was allowed free reign to wander around. But when he sold it, and my parents stopped for a drink, we were made to sit in the car with a packet of crisps and a bottle of lemonade.
It would be called child neglect these days. :*

tony draper
3rd Apr 2014, 10:08
Seen and not heard was a good rule, and a swift cuff along the ear to enforce same.
:rolleyes:

Akrotiri71
3rd Apr 2014, 11:04
Seen and not heard was a good rule, and a swift cuff along the ear to enforce same.

Or Mum's death-stare was usually sufficient.....:uhoh:

treadigraph
3rd Apr 2014, 12:03
Various experiences of disgraceful behaviour by children in pubs, running amok amidst other customers and screaming/shrieking loudly chief amongst them, but little brats chucking stones around in a Brighton pub garden was the worst; the "parents" really didn't give a :mad: until I threatened to forward any further projectiles that came my - or my pint's - way. They got the message with ill grace.

rgbrock1
3rd Apr 2014, 12:43
Tony D wrote:

Seen and not heard was a good rule, and a swift cuff along the ear to enforce same.

For kids, or the Mrs.? :}:E

MFC_Fly
3rd Apr 2014, 12:43
Thanks, MFC Fly, but I prefer stunning Latinas! :p
Oops - Add it to your list, you know what I meant :O

Gertrude the Wombat
3rd Apr 2014, 12:48
Kids are not even taught how to handle cutlery - watching youngsters handle knives and forks is quite distressing!
Yes, this was explained to me, by one of my children, as follows:


The school cannot enforce use of cutlery on children for whom it is not part of their culture.


Therefore the school cannot enforce use of cutlery on anyone else, otherwise it would be racism.


Therefore all the children ate with their fingers, and saw all their mates doing the same, and considered this normal, and regarded their parents' use of cutlery as a bit weird.

rgbrock1
3rd Apr 2014, 12:54
Yes, this was explained to me, by one of my children, as follows:


The school cannot enforce use of cutlery on children for whom it is not part of their culture.


Therefore the school cannot enforce use of cutlery on anyone else, otherwise it would be racism.

When, oh when, does the PC bullshit stop? :ugh::ugh::ugh:

Mac the Knife
3rd Apr 2014, 17:00
Are you serious Gertrude??? I suppose you must be, but but that is majorly wierd!

Mac

:bored:

wings folded
3rd Apr 2014, 17:09
Are you serious Gertrude??? I suppose you must be, but but that is majorly wierd!

Mac

:bored:

Mac the Knife and fork one presumes

Mac the Knife
3rd Apr 2014, 19:24
Only when I operate on you wings..............!

:E

Mac

RedhillPhil
3rd Apr 2014, 22:04
It seems to me that many parents literally cannot hear their own children screaming or running around in a pub/restaurant. It's a form of selective deafness!


..and that Sir is the big problem. Just this very afternoon whilst queuing in Sainsbury's (other supermercados are available) I suffered the high pitched squealing of a sprog who's mother had a mobile telephonic device jammed to her ear 'ole.

500N
3rd Apr 2014, 22:13
I am sure I was the same when I was a kid but the number of time I have had to stop in the shop or when walking between shops in the shopping centre because some young kid comes whizzing by, oblivious to anyone else stuns me.

I stop, put my hand out so they don't crash into me, then walk on.

Rarely do I hear the parents say sorry or tell the kid to be more careful !


And I am not adverse to kids playing roughly or spending time running around but in places where it is suitable, not shopping centres !

ExSp33db1rd
4th Apr 2014, 08:15
I'll buy the first beers if we ever meet up in the Santa Monica outlet (my favourite)Kings Head ? be there end of June.

Driving through the Yorkshire Dales one balmy evening, stopped at a village pub, left Mrs. and two kids in the car and ordered 1 beer, 1 wine and 2 cokes in bottles with straws. "can't take my glasses out'f pub" said the Yorkshireman. "I know that", I replied, "that's why I asked for bottles and straws." "No" said the publican, "I mean my beer and wine glasses" "Well, I can't leave the kids out on their own, I'll bring them in then" "Can't bring kids into t'bar" "I know that .. etc".

As I hadn't yet paid I told him to stuff his beer, "no problem" he replied, and poured the beer and wine down the sink !

In the next village we found a pub with a "Family room". No problem.

Rwy in Sight
4th Apr 2014, 09:52
Thats the problem, somehow today's young parents don't seem to think its their responsibility to control their child, they honestly expect the rest of society to compensate.



Lone_Ranger, I would rather say tolerate rather than compensate.

And also don't get me started on old people trying to by pass the waiting line just because they are older.

Rwy in Sight

Octopussy2
4th Apr 2014, 10:47
I'm afraid your (rather broad) statement would put me in that category, Lone Ranger so naturally I can't agree.

For the record, my children (whilst having been taken out to eat frequently) have never been allowed to run riot (I take it the odd trip to the loo is permissible??), and they do indeed know how to use cutlery. And to say please and thank you to the waiters. From some of the posts above, I'm led to believe that my family is in a minority of one.

Whilst it's flattering to think that I am a sole luminary in the art of bringing up children who know how to behave in a restaurant, somehow I think that is not the case.

But you're all having so much fun being grumpy, please don't let me spoil it :p

Tankertrashnav
4th Apr 2014, 10:59
I think your location may have something to do with this. In my very limited experience of the Swiss, bad public behaviour is taken far more seriously than in the UK, and the parents of children allowed to run riot would pretty soon be censured by fellow diners/drinkers. Many in this country who have read cases of men being kicked to death in the street for complaining about noise, litter, vandalism etc might think twice before intervening, and just grit their teeth.

I'm sure you're not in a minority of one. When my own children were young I was going through a fairly "economically challenged" period and trips to restaurants were sufficiently rare as to slightly overawe them - they just got their heads down and enjoyed the experience.

Octopussy2
4th Apr 2014, 11:31
I take your point, Tanker but we've only been here for 3 years, so my kids were 6 and 3 when we left the UK and we used to eat out with them pretty much weekly.

I agree in general that Swiss and French children know how to behave at the table. Swiss kids in supermarkets and on busses though - now that's another story!

I still can't get used to dogs in supermarkets, either. I've nothing against dogs (and don't mind them in pubs) but in shops I still find it weird. Just conditioning, I suppose.

jayteeto
4th Apr 2014, 14:45
I have a 3yr old daughter who has been taken out with us since she was born. She behaves herself because WE make her. She is well mannered because WE taught her and she is a delight to take out, lots of pleases and thank you's. On the rare occasions that she is tired and grumpy, we don't go out with her.
Reading the thread here, all kids are made out to be demons, they are not. Its 100% the feckless parents fault. I-Phone junkies who can't go 2 minutes without facebook and alcohol or arrogant tossers who think the rules don't apply to them. When these people are in the pub without their kids, they still don't change. Of note, the kids run riot in children only facilities as well (playparks, softplay, swimming pools, zoos, etc etc).

rgbrock1
4th Apr 2014, 14:50
jayteeto:

Personal responsibility? Responsibility for your own children and raising them well?

Holy shit, what a concept. :}

An alien concept for many but one nonetheless.

Krystal n chips
4th Apr 2014, 17:20
Another fascinating insight regarding social perceptions then.

If you go to a pub, and there are fairly obvious signs it's a family orientated venue, if you don't like it......go to another pub !.

There's nothing wrong with taking kids to such venues as such because it introduces them to social habits and intermingling away from their own peer groups.....however, it's also fair to say that kids behaviour reflects on the parents....and that's applicable to ALL social classes.

Dogs. Dogs are fine. They are either very well behaved or, astute attention seekers for a lot of gratuitous dog worship....finding the gullible human is straightforward therefore....they are also very good judges of human nature and hence I am pleased to say I have gullible human stencilled all over me as far as animals are concerned.

Not so when it comes to humans however although there are several on here whom I would happily pay a pound more to drink with.....no JB constraints being applicable....:E

Supermarkets are also a source of "entertainment"....kids on scooters etc is surely just plain dangerous....for everybody. However, not so long ago, one was in a well known upmarket supermarket, saving a sodding fortune by buying their reduced items when one was ordered no less to "get out of my you little man"..uttered from the dulcet gob of say an 11 / 12 yr old boy.

Now, some may well applaud these comments, addressed as they were to moi, and indeed it was remiss of me to stand in front of a shelf when the little darling wished to do so....enter...Yummy Mummy...with a faux "so sorry" apology....one opined that, "not difficult to see where that bit of philosophy came from is it?.....Mummy's face went...:} at this point....although it's possible that my final comment...said very politely...."you Tory witch" did not go down well with, erm, another of my self perceived....betters.

vulcanised
4th Apr 2014, 17:38
There's a branch of Tesco concerned for our welware.

A woman recently sent her 16yo grandson to buy a packet of teaspoons. The vigilant staff discovered he was under 18 snd refused the transaction.

Imagine the mayhem if a gang of teenagers had been allowed to roam the streets armed with teaspoons. :rolleyes:

ExSp33db1rd
4th Apr 2014, 22:39
Sorry, off topic but in response to ...............

And also don't get me started on old people trying to by pass the waiting line just because they are older.

.............or those who expect their request to be answered immediately because they use the telephone. I've been known to reach over the counter and cut off a telephone when I've been waiting in line for ages, I'M next, not the bloody 'phone !

Equally, I recently complimented a sales girl for totalling ignoring the ringing phone until she had completed serving the line up to the last person in line when the phone started to ring.

cockney steve
4th Apr 2014, 23:25
I never had any problem with my children behaving in public.
The FFrench ditto.
discipline and education go a long way to turning out good citizens.

The feckless, feral and antisocial should be confined to sink estates where they rightly belong.
I endured many hours standing in a smoky bar (illegal!) while my father drank and chatted with his friends. I wouldn't have dared to be a nuisance.
for explanation,- he was blind and itwas a "social club"...took him there , waited, took him home......When I was older, I would walk him to a Buffaloes meeting, then walk home, about a mile, unaccompanied,at night (about 8pm) never got molested or abducted, but did once get a ride in a vintage car, which I'd spotted on the way there, inspected on the way back, and a gent got out of a car driven by a lady....he engaged me in conversation and as a result, with assurances from his wife, we drove to his vintage car collection. I was given a ride home, after they had phoned to explain my whereabouts! would have been about 1959.
Said collection was sold some years ago, when Mr. Westwood, of Westwood and Clark, Clacton on Sea, passed on.

Howzat for thread-drift! :O (but it was about the rewards for being well-behaved and polite, as a kid!-sort of.