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BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 01:34
Lobster. Oysters.

Tarq57
15th Mar 2014, 01:41
Oysters. Oatmeal. Offal.

Not all together, however.

superq7
15th Mar 2014, 01:42
Fish & Chips with mushy peas then sticky toffee pudding with custard, yummy !

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 01:49
May I add American bacon?

Mac the Knife
15th Mar 2014, 01:49
Pretty much anything apart from BEETROOT :yuk:

Mac

:suspect:

superq7
15th Mar 2014, 01:58
Reese's peanut butter cups, if sweets are allowed.

defizr
15th Mar 2014, 02:07
It's 1 o'clock in the morning. Kebabs obviously...

pigboat
15th Mar 2014, 02:35
NY strip steaks, lobsters, standing rib roast, salt beef and cabbage.

500N
15th Mar 2014, 02:59
Heaps on food but from the top of my head,

Seafood especially Scallops, Pork, Lamb, Chicken, Buffalo, Barramundi.

Sweet potato.

cattletruck
15th Mar 2014, 03:02
Beef Massaman curry with coconut rice and a roti bread. Had it 2 days ago after a long while....yum.

Tarq57
15th Mar 2014, 04:15
Oh, Yum. Malay/Thai food is indeed awesome.

As is Chinese, Indian, Fijian, Samoan, and British. Fairly partial to French, too.

In fact, probably true to say that Food (generally) is one of my favourite things.

Pinky the pilot
15th Mar 2014, 04:16
Seafood. Sri Lankan curries, (mild only; can't handle the hot stuff anymore)
Japanese, Malaysian and Chinese.

And a well done Rump steak with pepper sauce, accompanied by a good Barossa Valley Red!:ok:

Vercingetorix
15th Mar 2014, 11:24
Venison, Quail, Jugged hare

Capetonian
15th Mar 2014, 11:55
Chocolate marzipan (it almost qualifies as '5 a day' with a bit of imagination!)
Tunnocks Biscuits.

Indonesian, Thai, and Malay food, in that order.

Crispy bacon and fluffy scrambled eggs on brown toast.

Fillet steak, lighly charred on the outside and pink on the inside.

Roast chicken with (my) home made stuffing, and brussel sprouts or 'petits pois'.

Geschnetzeltes or Wiener Schnitzel with Roesti.

I'm hungry, must go down for breakfast.

Wingswinger
15th Mar 2014, 12:21
There is no finer breakfast than a bowl of porridge highlander style - jumbo organic oats, made with milk, a few measures of malt whiskey and sweetened with heather honey, followed by a smoked haddock fillet with two poached eggs.

Am I in heaven?

Alternatively, smoked salmon and scrambled egg or a couple of kippers.

Limeygal
15th Mar 2014, 12:32
Curry, mushrooms, marmite, baked beans, eggs, shepherd pie-buggrit, now I'm really hungry

sitigeltfel
15th Mar 2014, 12:51
A generous Cote de Boeuf with some Frites, Bernaise sauce and mushrooms.

Magic!

http://s3-media1.ak.yelpcdn.com/bphoto/ruUuO-8fZO1w3_l_F5NRcQ/l.jpg

cumulusrider
15th Mar 2014, 12:52
Proper Biltong ( not the plastic muck you get in packets in the UK), sea trout cooked from catching within 6hrs. Samphire. Well matured scotish rump steak. Im now hungry.

Yamagata ken
15th Mar 2014, 13:53
Foods? Non-countable noun. Fail in my English class.

Muzzey
15th Mar 2014, 16:37
Capetonian; you have impeccable taste sir, that's exactly the list I would have written!
Just to confirm; chocolate marzipan, you do mean dark chocolate right :ok:

Um... lifting...
15th Mar 2014, 17:07
Jamón Ibérico de bellota.

superq7
15th Mar 2014, 17:07
Um what's that ?

Um... lifting...
15th Mar 2014, 17:13
The ham of the gods.

Jamón ibérico - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibérico)

Lightning Mate
15th Mar 2014, 17:47
"May I add American bacon?"


No you may not - it's utter rubbish.

Um... lifting...
15th Mar 2014, 17:50
No you may not - it's utter rubbish.


Depends. The stuff that's shrink-wrapped and processed? True.

The bellies that are smoked over applewood, thick sliced and lovingly rationed? Put English streaky bacon to shame.

wings folded
15th Mar 2014, 17:54
We hold these truths to be self evident:

only the English fully understand bacon

End.

Um... lifting...
15th Mar 2014, 18:06
"English" and "Cuisine".

Two words that are not normally found together in nature.

Tankertrashnav
15th Mar 2014, 18:35
A bit like "Fine American Cheese"

Oops, that's three words :O

To answer the OP - poached eggs on toast - the only thing I can eat every day of my life without ever tiring of them.

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 19:00
Ah. Beg to disagree, having had bacon just about everywhere it's legal.

American bacon is unchallenged, as my Aussie wife agrees. It cooks thin, melts in your mouth if not overcooked, and you cook your eggs (and the damned tomato) in the grease it leaves behind for a delicacy reserved for the cognoscenti.

I do respect English bangers as worthy breakfast fare, but there's nothing like American bacon.

Lightning Mate
15th Mar 2014, 19:04
B###ocks !!!!

ex_matelot
15th Mar 2014, 19:08
Can Benthere be banned (or at least beheaded) for suggesting American bacon?


I'm outraged! America does not even have bacon. It has processed strips of processed pork.

This is fighting talk!!

Um... lifting...
15th Mar 2014, 19:12
"Fine American Cheese"

Again, it's all where you go.

Odd that a nation that had so much of the map pink for so long can't seem to navigate about N. America worth a farthing on matters culinary.

Wisconsin, N. California, Oregon, parts of New England and New York have cheeses that rival any made anywhere on earth. And yes, you can get unpasteurized cheeses, if you know who to ask.

Which clearly you do not.

If I'm in the UK I don't ask a chav where good things can be found. Why do the English do the equivalent in the U.S?

Mysterious. Puzzling.

wings folded
15th Mar 2014, 19:30
but there's nothing like American bacon.
How true, how true...

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 19:51
Okay. So not everyone thinks, like me, that American bacon is the paragon. To your taste I defer your privilege to dissent.

On a tangent, but related tack, I've been buying grass-fed beef, pasture and stye raised pork, holistically raised chickens and eggs, and such, from a local supplier committed to the welfare and enterprise of the American family farm.

Lest I be labeled a huggy-fluff, which I am definitely not, I think it is worthy to promote, and healthy to eat, foods which are not mass produced by means of hormone injections, processed corn feed, feedlot fattening, and the like.

I'm willing to pay substantially more for the meat of pasture fed animals and the eggs and meat of chickens raised according to their nature. Why? Because the food I get from farm coops tastes better, the animals live better lives, and my dollars support a way of life - the family farm - that I think is important to my culture.

I do, however support genetically modified seed as the only viable means to feed the masses of the world.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
15th Mar 2014, 19:57
Benthere :ok:for properly raised meat.
Spuds - best in the world here; and lobsters, oysters and mussels.


Canadian Bacon - accept no substitutes!

TomJoad
15th Mar 2014, 20:04
We hold these truths to be self evident:

only the English fully understand bacon

End.

So self evident - the bacon and egg roll - truly sublime.

ex_matelot
15th Mar 2014, 20:08
yeee..haaaa!!... got a bite out of ben!! ; )


Posted from Pprune.org App for Android

wings folded
15th Mar 2014, 20:13
Lest I be labeled a huggy-fluff, which I am definitely not, I think it is worthy to promote, and healthy to eat, foods which are not mass produced by means of hormone injections, processed corn feed, feedlot fattening, and the like.

I'm willing to pay substantially more for the meat of pasture fed animals and the eggs and meat of chickens raised according to their nature.
Be not afraid to be labelled huggie fluffy pinko leftie homo arachnophobic or whatever. If you want to eat something which is not harmful, make that choice.

Educate your fellow citizens about the benefits of eating stuff which has not been messed around , and discourage them from dumping messed around food on other nations under the feeble and totally untrue guise that it is safe and it is a "good thing"

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 20:52
and discourage them from dumping messed around food on other nations

The rub is that I can afford to pay the extra cost of wholesome food. The hungry masses of the world can't. If they don't have access to genetically modified seed, lots of potash and nitrogen fertilizers, and other man-made inducements to vegetable and protein growth, they won't have enough to eat.

It's the height of arrogance to condemn people to hunger so as to satisfy a purist vision of organic righteousness.

Or, we can take the approach that populations unable to feed themselves in accordance with our healthy, organic strictures, will reduce themselves naturally.

500N
15th Mar 2014, 20:59
BenThere

In some areas, particularly those without water, yes, it is damn hard to grow stuff but food does grow naturally without "genetically modified seed, lots of potash and nitrogen fertilizers, and other man-made inducements to vegetable and protein growth,".

Half the problem is 1. water, 2. teaching people to grow stuff that is suitable to the area that can also sustain people.

Admittedly, they won't be fat like us westerners but people survived before all the things man added.

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 21:12
That's the answer. Those that figure out the environment they're in and adapt to it, will learn how to survive.

One troubling thought, though, is how our Western urban dependents will survive when their government checks are either stopped or will no longer buy anything.

And that leads to the vulnerability of our very specialized, advanced, first world economies - who's going to survive a breakdown?

500N
15th Mar 2014, 21:17
Me for one. Hunt, fish et al.

Up north - ie anywhere in the world that is classed as "tropical", food is abundant if grown. I am shown so much food up north that I walk past it is not funny (by Aboriginals).

And none of it is planted so imagine if someone actually took the time to "seed" an area with more bushes or plants etc - mangoes being a good example - then over time you get more of the food trees. it only take a plant a couple of years up there to grow and produce.

My eyes are opened every time I go to what is possible.

That is if people can think outside of the square and not expect food on a foam tray from Woolworths etc !!!

Donkey497
15th Mar 2014, 21:31
To throw more grease on the bacon argument fire....... I would firmly relegate American bacon to the back burner in favour of Canadian Peameal.


On my annual pilgrimage to Muskoka, my only wish to make it Nirvana would be that Fresh Kutz, my favourite breakfast haunt, would add proper Lancashire Black Pudding to its Peameal, Eggs, Tomato, Home Fries & Toast breakfast.


That for breakfast, scallops & squid for lunch & a proper plate of haggis & neeps for dinner would make my year.

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 21:38
a proper plate of haggis & neeps for dinner

That's why we don't look to Scotland for culinary cues.

The whiskey, though. On that I bend my knee.

500N
15th Mar 2014, 21:40
Talking of bacon.

Had some superb bacon /pork this year from some pigs shot that had come off a flood plain. On said flood plain are plenty of bulbs / roots etc but also some sort of water chestnut.

They gorge themselves on them and apart from making them fat it puts a lovely flavour through the meat.

Superb :ok:

Tankertrashnav
15th Mar 2014, 21:45
The whisky, though. On that I bend my knee.


Fixed that for you, Ben ;)

If I'm in the UK I don't ask a chav where good things can be found. Why do the English do the equivalent in the U.S?

Mysterious. Puzzling.

If I tell you I've only been to two places in the US - Omaha and Las Vegas maybe that'll solve the mystery!

BenThere
15th Mar 2014, 21:54
They gorge themselves on them and apart from making them fat it puts a lovely flavour through the meat.

Pardon me for slobbering, but I would absolutely love feasting on wild boar bacon, and later slavering on the rest of the pig, out in the wilds of interior Australia. What a blessed life you live, 500N!

goudie
15th Mar 2014, 21:56
My favourite breakfast is dried cured bacon, from local butcher, on wholemeal toast, accompanied by a side dish of crunchy gherkins, pickled in sweet vinegar.

500N
15th Mar 2014, 22:05
BenThere

Agree, wild pig is awesome ut if you reckon that makes you slobber, listen to this.

The Aboriginal lady cooked it - a leg, brisket and a few other choice bits - in a fire pit - hot coals, hot stones, some green leaves and covered in bark - that smoked it as it cooked it so it made it doubly good (if that is a word :O).

When it was cooked, I think I spent 1/2 and hour with her and her sister,
just slicing bits of meat off right next to the "fire pit". It didn't need anything else, it just melted in your mouth.

:ok:

Wish I could do it every week or month !

gingernut
15th Mar 2014, 22:15
Sometimes the simple things rule:

Beans on toast, lashing's of butter, a bit of white pepper.

Sardines on toast, sprinkling of vinegar and a little cracked black pepper.

Mackerel (I know) freshly caught, gutted, wrapped in a bit of foil, straight on the bbq, eaten after a surf and sipping white wine.

Those plump olives in Tesco, stuffed with garlic and stuff, never taste the same when they turn to sludge in the pot they give you, but are wonderful if freshly stolen.

Waking up in Cornwall, after a long drive/surf, and chucking the bacon on the outside bbq with some freshly cut onions. On toast, the brown stuff with seed in.

Marinated chicken or minced lamb, mixed in with "caravan sauce" which generally consists of blended garlic (always), ginger (mostly), olive oil (always), black peppercorns (usually), thyme (seasonal), peri peri sauce or chillis, and all the bits in the cupboard.And a few crushed nuts. Served with a green salad, slices of whatever citrus is around, and yoghurt.

Chips are pretty good to, if you find a decent chippy :)

500N
15th Mar 2014, 22:18
Mackerel (I know) freshly caught,

Now that brings back memories from my many holidays in Cornwall.

meadowrun
15th Mar 2014, 22:25
Being in Canada a fair bit I find the peameal (back) bacon not so good. Kind of dry and lacking in flavour. As with most countries, supermarket bacon is also not very good. Here, I have to find a butcher's or farmer's market for the good stuff - smoked, double smoked, cured, uncured.

The Welsh do a very good selection of bacons.

Donkey497
15th Mar 2014, 22:33
Also difficult to beat........


Freshly caught, topped, tailed, gutted & boned Herring, pan fried in butter until crispy served with baby new potatoes coated in butter and oatmeal. and a little salt.

gingernut
15th Mar 2014, 22:59
Nowadays you can sit on a boat or Mevagissey Harbour all day, and just catch one. At high tide. About 15-20 yrs they used to come in their droves, never liked to waste them, and they don't keep very well, so we ended up eating them for breakfast, dinner and tea.

pigboat
16th Mar 2014, 00:29
Spuds - best in the world here; and lobsters, oysters and mussels.
Spuds and oysters, but you guys wouldn't have lobsters if we didn't throw the undersized ones back. :E

Wingswinger
16th Mar 2014, 00:52
Uisge, though. On that I bend my knee.

Fixed that for you TTN!

Freshly caught, gutted and barbecued mackerel. Drool.

Ditto Sewin (sea trout).

421dog
16th Mar 2014, 00:58
Pheasant and wild rice soup (Pheasant from my farm and wild rice from the creek behind our place in Wisconsin)

The catfish out of a freshly killed deer, Sliced 2 inches thick, and shown briefly to a very hot pan to enable the production of a minimalist red wine reduction. served with tiny new potatoes

Brussels Sprouts deeply carmelized in bacon grease with a fair amount of kosher salt.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
16th Mar 2014, 00:59
Maximum lobster migration in the Gulf of St Lawrence is 40km - It's Northern NB wot gets your tiddlers!;)

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/f35-011?journalCode=jbbc#.UyTo5flr58E

421dog
16th Mar 2014, 01:00
Oh, and flathead catfish fresh off the trotline, fried in Drakes and peanut oil.

Pinky the pilot
16th Mar 2014, 02:12
Brussels Sprouts deeply carmelized in bacon grease with a fair amount of kosher salt.

No....No...a thousand times, NO!!:mad::yuk:

Quick; someone tell con-pilot not to look!:eek:

ExSp33db1rd
16th Mar 2014, 04:48
May I add American bacon?

Absolutely Sir, if you mean that nice crispy stuff.

I've given up asking for Eggs Benidect with CRISPY bacon in New Zealand, they haven't the foggiest idea.

( what do you call en Ex-Pope ? Ex Benedict )

Solid Rust Twotter
16th Mar 2014, 12:24
As mentioned:

Steak

Bacon

Beer


The husband of a cousin down at the coast is a keen salt water angler and has a bait licence to catch his own. One has been known to raid his bait box for breakfast, or purloin his licence for that purpose, leaving him a bucket of leftovers for his piscine endeavours.

Said cousin regards one as some sort of savage for whatever reason...

Lightning Mate
16th Mar 2014, 12:28
Spaghetti Carbonara - Mrs. LM does a cracker.

Checkboard
16th Mar 2014, 12:36
Bacon of the Month Clubs (http://www.baconfreak.com/bacon-of-the-month-clubs.html) :ok:

Lightning Mate
16th Mar 2014, 12:44
But where's the Gloucestershire Old Spot ?

Private jet
17th Mar 2014, 11:43
Curries, especially hot ones.
Roast chicken
Tomatoes
Deep fried cod, chips and mushy peas
Smoked salmon

MagnusP
17th Mar 2014, 12:47
Game. Fresh Scottish seafood. +1 for good bacon or proper pancetta. Duck eggs.

rgbrock1
17th Mar 2014, 14:07
Dry bagels. (As dry as the Sahara desert preferably)

racedo
17th Mar 2014, 14:34
Petite du fois Canard...........mmmmmmmmmmmm

The SSK
17th Mar 2014, 14:39
Spicy stuff – Oriental, Mediterranean, Mexican, Seffrican
Salty and Umami flavours – anchovies, olives, capers, parmesan, Marmite
Most cheese, including blue and smelly
Potatoes done most ways
Fresh cod, haddock, sole
Lobster, crab, shrimp
Really fresh eggs and naturally ripened tomatoes
Mushrooms
Liver, kidney, sweetbreads, haggis
Pulses

MagnusP
17th Mar 2014, 15:23
So, SSK, that was lunch. What's for dinner? :ok:

The SSK
17th Mar 2014, 15:44
It was a buffet
I only took a little bit of each
Honest

Burp!

con-pilot
17th Mar 2014, 19:52
Brussels Sprouts deeply carmelized in bacon grease with a fair amount of kosher salt.

What a horrid waste of pork fat and kosher salt. :=

Now, to the subject at hand.

Lord help me, I've not a clue, as there are so many.

But first, let me end the debate about bacon. I have flown all over the world and have eaten every variation of bacon known to man. Simply put, American bacon rules. When cooked properly and using good bacon, not the crap wrapped in plastic that one finds in the super market.

My proof. The BLT sandwich. One cannot have a proper BLT without crispy cooked American bacon. Case closed.

Now that we have that sorted, on with the subject at hand.

I'll start with oysters, I mean why not.

Fresh on the half shell, chilled with only lemon juice on them. Or. Fresh shucked oysters, put on a long fork, then grilled over a charcoal fire, then dipped in melted butter, fabulous. Oysters on the half shell roasted over a charcoal fire with melted butter and Paramesan cheese on top. That you have to try to understand just how good it is.

Fresh steamed snow crab legs with warm melted butter. Messy but great!

A two or thicker inch sirloin steak chared on the outside, red and warm in the middle.

Fried chicken, mashed potatoes, pan gravy with fresh corn on the cod.

Fresh local farm raised catfish, covered in cornmeal and pan fried.

Deep fried turkey. :ok:

Hell, the list just keeps going on, think I'll quit for right now.

rgbrock1
17th Mar 2014, 19:54
con:

for some odd reason in your rather lengthy list of foods you seem to enjoy I fail to see any mention made of Brussels sprouts. Why is that? :}:E

Windy Militant
17th Mar 2014, 22:59
Fried chicken, mashed potatoes, pan gravy with fresh corn on the cod. Hmm something fishy there methinks! :}

Just had a simple school dinner type baked battered fish, mash n baked beans, with a large mug of tea. Nectar and Ambrosia! :ok:

tdracer
18th Mar 2014, 00:41
My proof. The BLT sandwich. One cannot have a proper BLT without crispy cooked American bacon. Case closed.

Thank you Con-pilot. Good American (or non-Canadian 'style' Canadian) bacon rocks. Thick cut, properly smoke cured, cooked until it just gets crispy then drained (too many overcook it or leave it sit to get soggy). Awesome :ok:.

But I'm surprised no one has mentioned American pizza. Good, deep dish (aka Chicago style), lots of toppings and a blend of cheeses and a spicy red sauce. Unlike thin crust pizza, deep dish makes the dough super important - some get it right, many do not. But if they get it right, deep dish pizza with Canadian bacon, mushrooms, onions, and maybe extra cheese (pepperoni is OK, but it makes the pizza too greasy for my tastes). Give me one of those and a growler of good beer and I'm a happy man :D

Um... lifting...
18th Mar 2014, 14:32
Good, deep dish (aka Chicago style)

One imagines rgbrock1 will be along shortly to disabuse you of the notion of Chicago style pizza (or just abuse you).

As a pizza agnostic, I am not bound to any particular theology of pizza, but I believe for rgbrock1, putting 'Chicago' and 'pizza' in the same sentence is a grievous sin.

A distinct advantage of New York pizza, which can't be disputed, is its portability. Purchase, fold along a radius line, continue walking through the city.

meadowrun
18th Mar 2014, 15:07
Yes, well, unfortunately most New Yorkers and most denizens of other cities can't walk and eat pizza or hot dogs or anything else at the same time. Neither can they, text, talk on phones and walk at the same time.