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Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 00:10
One of the the things that occupies a considerable amount of my time (all volunteer) is running the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre with my wife. We primarily rehabilitate birds, specializing in large raptors. We spent the last six years fundraising to build a structure specifically designed for eagles, osprey, owls and other large birds of prey. Officially we call it the Large Raptor Flight Recovery Facility, unofficially it is known as The Big Jeezley. It was completed in the fall of 2013. Here are a couple of videos of two of the first eagles in the flyway.

Quite awe inspiring seeing these creatures arrive sick and broken and eventually getting strong enough to be returned to the wild.
Cheers
Mudman

watch?v=Psq2dqbelLE

pxVMZu_Kqao

Shaggy Sheep Driver
15th Mar 2014, 01:11
Fabulous, especially as they then return to the wild. We don't have eagles here, but we do have a lot of buzzards. Naturally, they thermal soar which means they appear upwind and drift downwind to be lost to sight. But while they are in view, they are magnificent.

Often, a pair at altitude will play, diving on each other like attacking dog fighters. The one which is the target will often roll inverted talons extended, to meet those of the 'attacker' diving from above.

They just have to be doing this for fun!

That they can do this sort of thing, maintain or gain height, and never flap a wing says they are much better thermal soarers than I ever was by some margin!

First time I saw a red kite it was being mobbed by crows. It was only about 50 feet up, soaring. It did a sort of steep slipping turn to lose the crows, and I thought 'now it'll have to flap to regain height'. No.... it climbed steadily from about 10 up to 50 feet again, with never a flap. How it found the lift I'll never know.

pigboat
15th Mar 2014, 02:44
Wow, that is something else. What a wonderful endeavor.

I'll bet someone looked at the facility and said "That's some Joe Jeezley big cage my son," hence the name. :p

Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 03:04
Thanks for the reply. It has been my experience too that some birds fly for the fun of it. Crows, ravens, gulls have exhibited such behaviour where the activity seems unrelated to anything like finding food or acquiring a mate etc.

Knowing the size of an eagle's wing span and how much they weigh I can see how easy it is for them to ride thermals. We handle all bird species of Nova Scotia and some accidentals. Everything from hummingbirds to eagles.

At the moment we have 26 animals here and this is our quiet time. 5 owls ( 3 snowys, 1 great horned, 1 northern sahwet) 2 immature eagles (seen in the video, 1 mature eagle, a great blue heron and a bunch of others.

Each bird species has physical and behavioral adaptations completely suited to its niche in the environment.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-gRu8iikJ81c/UyO0cdVqZKI/AAAAAAAAGe4/G5RxsFQbIgA/s640/IMG_7721.jpg

Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 03:08
Wow, that is something else. What a wonderful endeavor.

I'll bet someone looked at the facility and said "That's some Joe Jeezley big cage my son," hence the name.

Pretty close. Before the enclosure was built we referred to the birds as "the big jeezley" bird... so naturally it would follow we'd name the building in a similar fashion. The term "jeezley" I picked up from a Canadian comedian who used the term to exaggerate things and circumstances for comedic effect.

500N
15th Mar 2014, 03:14
Mudman

Awesome, well done.

Very clever idea making it circular so hey can do continuous flight.


Have kept quite a few Hawks and owls in my younger years when involved in ornithology, most released back into the wild at some point. One long eared owl actually escaped and took off, luckily it was close to release date. Anyway it survived for a few years until hit by a car and the ring returned to the bird place in the UK (which is how we found out about it).


What you do is truly superb.

Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 03:41
Thanks. It has been an interesting journey. We classify the escapees as "self-released". :D

500N
15th Mar 2014, 04:00
Mudman

With the juvies, do you teach them to "hunt" ?

We used to let slightly "whacked out" mice that still moved but wouldn't run away. This allowed the owls etc to jump down and grab them. In fact, the long eared owl I mentioned before (was nearly an adult when we got it) flew off the perch and grabbed it before we had even got out :rolleyes:


It's very satisfying feeding them up to be fat as can be before release although breeding the mice got a bit out of hand at times !!! Luckily the mice are root rats so supply never stopped !

Krystal n chips
15th Mar 2014, 08:00
Mudman,

That's a very commendable project. :ok:

It's always interesting to read about our avian friends and how many people on here take an interest in them, without being avid birdwatchers.

Just out of interest, do you get any form of Gov't funding for the project, it would be nice to think you did, however........

On the lighter side, the expression on the eagles face in the photo makes for a perfect caption completion now doesn't it ?.....:D

" We don't have eagles here "

Erm, oh yes we do....you just need to go North, rather than South, from Wilmslow....Aboyne perhaps ?....which is in Scotland.....to save you asking.

In 2006 I posted a query on here about a possible sighting, and to this day I am convinced I did see an eagle, near Arnside, while driving on the road along the side of the estuary heading back to the A6 / Milnthorpe

On the other hand, I once certainly had the pleasure of sharing a thermal with one....the look of disdain and confusion at the idiot in the Ka8 was justified..... in Germany. As ever, no camera when one would have proved "useful".

Cacophonix
15th Mar 2014, 08:34
Mudman it is great to read your thread and of your support for feathered fellow flyers...

That enclosure (for it is more than a cage) is large enough to hold the Mothman!

Where I live in the UK I have seen Common Buzzards (actually they are quite uncommon) and can hear the owls almost every night. Good to know that they have friends like you out there and a pity there are not more organisations like yours worldwide.

That eagle that you are holding there reminds me of the slightly ruffled archetype of some American posters I have in my mind here on JB sometimes... ;)

Best of luck and all power to your elbow and their wings...

Caco

Shaggy Sheep Driver
15th Mar 2014, 10:07
My eyesight is pretty good, K&C, but I can't see the Scottish eagles from HERE. :rolleyes:

Lightning Mate
15th Mar 2014, 16:03
Probably the best flyers on PPRuNe.


Good work.

MadsDad
15th Mar 2014, 16:33
But, going into anthropomorphic mode, it appears that Mudman has done something to totally pee that Eagle off. Last time I saw a look like that was when I overcooked the family dinner.

Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 16:49
We have done live training with some of the young owls. The instinct is certainly there and it only takes a few tries before they get it.

The Eagle in the picture is waking from anesthetic. We need to hold onto them as they wake up so they do not hurt themselves or us. They tend to flail a bit on recovery. Eagles always look pissed off, btw.

G-CPTN
15th Mar 2014, 18:10
How do you 'capture' the birds again once they have been flying around the indoor space?

vulcanised
15th Mar 2014, 18:30
No experience with eagles but my experience of owls is that they are a delight to work with.

Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 18:40
How do you 'capture' the birds again once they have been flying around the indoor space?

Good question.
Not sure if you can see it in the video, however, in the floor are recessed boxes that have curtains folded into them. The plan is that they can be pulled up tight to the ceiling thus blocking the bird in a smaller area. The high perches can be pulled in from the second floor given the bird nothing to land on. They eventually will ground and we can corner them, cover with a blanket and grab.

Mudman
15th Mar 2014, 18:49
No experience with eagles but my experience of owls is that they are a delight to work with.

My favourite raptor to handle is the barred owl. Very easy going and relatively calm when being handled. The snowy owls are wing nuts, they are not happy about being handled one bit and let you know it. Most of the eagles we get are fairly emaciated and weak and don't have much fight left in them but the ones that are still fairly fit can be quite a handful.

In spite of the precautions we take I have been clawed by an eagle and a snowy owl and pinched by just about everything. Hence the heavy duty gloves. :D

I am getting good at reading the body language of most of the species we handle and can gauge how difficult they will likely be when handled. These are all wild animals and being touched and restrained is completely foreign and frightening to them. It is, I imagine, not unlike a person being abducted by aliens.

TomJoad
15th Mar 2014, 19:28
What a great effort to get these magnificent birds back to health. Can you imagine the sense of freedom they must feel once they are eventually released. I've always thought that to cage a bird is so wrong. Good luck with all your work to help these magnificent creatures.:ok:

beaufort1
15th Mar 2014, 20:32
Brilliant work and what a fantastic design to foster rehabilitation.:ok::ok:

Brian Abraham
18th Mar 2014, 04:41
Congratulations on your, and teams efforts Mudman. Happened to be walking the streets of Ketchikan a few years ago and came across a gentleman who was doing the same as you for the local wildlife, singlehandedly, and had converted his lounge room into into the birds residence. Once recovered they were of course released back to the wild. Sorry for the quality of the photos.

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m56/babraham227/PICT0071_zpscc2f93fa.jpg
http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m56/babraham227/PICT0072_zps3a6822b7.jpg
http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m56/babraham227/PICT0070_zps2db1631a.jpg

500N
18th Mar 2014, 05:01
Must be well fed eagles :O

Mudman
18th Mar 2014, 12:50
Congratulations on your, and teams efforts Mudman. Happened to be walking the streets of Ketchikan a few years ago and came across a gentleman who was doing the same as you for the local wildlife, singlehandedly, and had converted his lounge room into into the birds residence. Once recovered they were of course released back to the wild. Sorry for the quality of the photos.Thanks. That's basically how we started. My wife, a veterinarian, would bring home from work small birds that had hit windows or had been grabbed by cats. They only needed some time and care to recuperate but at a busy practice and no one to pay for the wild animal most clinics just euthanize these animals. She felt this was wrong and did something about it.

It grew to the point that we made it an official registered charity so we could finance the cost of the care we were providing. That was 13 years ago. We receive no government funding. Everything comes from private donations and fundraisers. All our time is volunteered and we both have day jobs.

The best part is returning an animal to the wild especially when their chances upon arrival at the centre looked pretty bleak. Most wild animals are surprisingly resilient and adaptable.

An online album of one of our patients here (https://plus.google.com/photos/109251525937586384476/albums/5728372753442500369)


https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-TTtX0Zpry8o/T39GNR4ylII/AAAAAAAAOro/dnPxRaEppho/w1070-h714-no/IMG_3318.jpg

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-OtdvfnnmK3s/T39GfMF44nI/AAAAAAAAOso/qS6dSoIIzWY/w1072-h714-no/IMG_3326.jpg

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-CKMPF3gtbZY/T39HTKQiyWI/AAAAAAAAOu4/uCvZ8AsIIig/w1073-h714-no/IMG_3379.jpg

Worrals in the wilds
18th Mar 2014, 13:36
That's an awesome structure. :ok:
We have a few local mobs who look after injured raptors and pelicans, but I don't think any of them have facilities like that.

I'll tell a tale that might amuse you...
A while ago we had bad local storms. Many sea birds were blown in and too exhausted to fly off again. We got calls from big tough baggage handlers, hardened freight guys and truckies about the poor birds they'd found cowering in corners, too frightened to move. :sad:

We went around with a non-scientific collection of jackets, blankets and photocopy-paper boxes and rounded them up, to much cheering from the big tough tattooed fraternity :cool:. A local bird society took them all on and most of them were later released after a good feed and a rest.

I took heart in the amount of care that was shown to the poor little things by guys who look like they'd eat their own mothers :}. It restored my faith in humanity when I turned up to find a bunch of guys who looked like they regularly featured in an underworld MMA syndicate, but were protecting a poor little bird with their own jackets while they went wet and cold, saying defensively 'well the poor little b:mad:stard just looked so :mad:ed, can you do something? We offered it Davo's chips, but it was too :mad:ed even for that, so it's really :mad:ing :mad:ed, can you do something for the poor little :mad:er ?? :}'

Then we'd get a call a week later from Davo to find out how the bird was getting on.

As Krystal said I think a lot of people like birds, even if they like to pretend otherwise. :ok:

Mudman
18th Mar 2014, 13:52
Thanks for the story Worrals. We have seen characters like that bring us animals too. We see a lot of seabirds that come ashore after a windy night. It is interesting that many of them are not able to take off from flat land because they are so adapted to open water. It is quite a foreign and confusing place for something that has never experienced it before.

A note about our structure:
The building is an extended octagon. It is 75' x 55'. The flyway is 16' wide and approximately 18' high. the interior has 4 smaller enclosures 10'wide x14'long x10'high. Storage space above that. It was based on a similar structure at Avian Haven Bird Centre in Virginia. As far as we know the one we built is the largest and the only one in Canada.

A link to photos of construction (https://picasaweb.google.com/112940540665752879148/FlightCageConstruction2013?authuser=0&feat=directlink)

This is one of my favourite shots. The building doesn't have lights as we never go in there at night when there are birds in it. This was taken just after it was completed last fall and before the first bird was in it. I placed a single light at the far end of the flyway and with a long exposure got the Milkyway and the building together.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-iQoWXcEPlfk/UkYvoE6YTmI/AAAAAAAAGPU/Y3r0nfw64ao/s512/IMG_2486.jpg

Good for the guys who took a moment to care.:D
Cheers.

Worrals in the wilds
18th Mar 2014, 14:15
It is interesting that many of them are not able to take off from flat land because they are so adapted to open water. It is quite a foreign and confusing place for something that has never experienced it before.That figures.
I think the well-known expression applies; Real pilots wear feathers. :cool: Us groundie grunts help out when we can; it's all about getting the aviator airbourne with the required fuel, payload and pre-flight safety checks completed. :\:}

Mudman
18th Mar 2014, 14:33
I think the well-known expression applies; Real pilots wear feathers. :cool: Us groundie grunts help out when we can; it's all about getting the aviator airbourne with the required fuel, payload and pre-flight safety checks completed.

That about sums it up.

barit1
18th Mar 2014, 14:35
From a book on my "must read" list:
I realized that If I had to choose, I would rather have birds than airplanes.
In wilderness I sense the miracle of life, and behind it our scientific accomplishments fade to trivia. Real freedom lies in wildness, not in civilization.

― Charles A. Lindbergh, "Autobiography of Values"

Ancient Mariner
18th Mar 2014, 14:52
Mudman, :ok:
Per

Mudman
18th Mar 2014, 15:03
Per, howdy from the great white north.
M.

Mudman
18th Mar 2014, 15:06
Bral, it has it's moments. Highs - bringing things back from the brink of death. Lows - getting perforated by the thing you brought back from the brink of death.

Hydromet
18th Mar 2014, 22:27
Raptors always look fantastic in flight. Great work you've done there.
Many years ago, in Bougainville, the houseboy next door had a young kite that he was going to eat, so I bought it from him for $1. We fed it on meat & feathers to get his strength up, and gave him flying lessons from the verandah, until he landed in a tree infested with red ants, and we had to put him under the tap to get them off.
Eventually, as we couldn't spend time, the company organised to fly him to the mainland in the company aircraft and get him to Baiyer River sanctuary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baiyer_River_Sanctuary).

Mudman
19th Mar 2014, 02:00
Raptors always look fantastic in flight. Great work you've done there.

Hi Hydromet, my experience with raptors is that they know they are cool whether flying or walking. They have a certain confidence that other birds lack. I think it comes from being a top predator. :E

They are great to watch in flight. Very powerful and agile.
Cheers

Cacophonix
19th Mar 2014, 02:09
Eviscerated mice aside...

Let the Eagles fly...

Eagle Feather - Native American music - YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eA0zpemMUow

Caco

Krystal n chips
19th Mar 2014, 04:59
Meanwhile, this aptly named Owl decided to take the scenic route....

BBC News - Owl survives 300-mile train trip from Glasgow to Crick (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-coventry-warwickshire-26629486)

Mudman
19th Mar 2014, 12:15
Hi Caco, thanks for the links.

Mudman
19th Mar 2014, 12:18
Meanwhile, this aptly named Owl decided to take the scenic route....

Thanks Krystal n Chips, quite the adventure for the owl. One of the snowy owls we have at our centre landed on a fishing trawler 300 km South East of Newfoundland. Talk about being way off course. Snowy owls are normally found north of the tree line.

Hydromet
19th Mar 2014, 12:20
Tough things, owls. Our (WIRES) bird carer had a powerful owl that had been hit by a car, brought in late one night. Not expecting it to survive the night, he put it on the floor of an aviary that contained an expensive breeding pair of parrots.

The next morning, there was a much recovered powerful owl and a few feathers.

beaufort1
19th Mar 2014, 14:10
You reckon that Snowy Owl was a little off course. We had a pair turn up here a couple of Winters ago.

BBC - Guernsey - Nature - A snowy owl on Lihou (http://www.bbc.co.uk/guernsey/content/articles/2009/01/16/snowy_owl_guernsey_feature.shtml)

G-CPTN
19th Mar 2014, 14:28
an expensive breeding pair of parrots.
The next morning, there was a much recovered powerful owl and a few feathers.Did they squawk 7700?

India Four Two
19th Mar 2014, 17:20
Mudman,

What a superb facility. Very well done.

Here are a couple of Golden Eagle photos taken last October by a member of my gliding club, near Cowley airfield in Southern Alberta:

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c309/india42/GoldenEagleIMG_3026_zps8dd03c06.jpg

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c309/india42/GoldenEagleIMG_6009_zps84963016.jpg

I have often soared with hawks, but have never been lucky enough to see an eagle.


These photos were taken during the southward Fall migration along the Front Ranges of the Rocky Mountains. The northward Spring migration is just starting.

This mass migration was unknown until 1992. Each year, thousands of eagles and other raptors migrate along this flyway. More information here:

Discovery of the Eagle Migration (http://www.eaglewatch.ca/eagle_science/migration_discovery.html)

Mudman
19th Mar 2014, 18:50
What a superb facility. Very well done.

Here are a couple of Golden Eagle photos taken last October by a member of my gliding club, near Cowley airfield in Southern Alberta:

Cool to hang with some locals. Different perspective to fly along with them.

airship
19th Mar 2014, 22:14
The OP confuses "other things that fly" maybe?

An eagle or other bird is not a "thing or object". Airplanes may indeed have souls like ships, but "naturally-flying" creatures should never be called mere "things". :\

I remember when I was aged about 15 years old and walking home a few miles uphill from the main Darjeeling town late one afternoon. I distinctly heard the sound of the bird (eagle or whatever, but a big one as I caught a glimpse) as it "fell" or "swooped" from a great height down on I think what was probably some domestic chickens situated at a home in the nearby valley (lots of people raised chickens back then to supplement their incomes, or just to provide them with fresh eggs - incredible as it might sound today, chicken meat was more expensive than even beef, pork, lamb or goat back in the mid 1970s, today ca. 2014, it's one of the cheapest meats worldwide...). Anyway, it was the closest thing to the sound of an Indian airforce (sub-sonic) Gnat of the day as it descended (no attempt at stealth...). The final sounds as it slowed down / attacked etc. were especially noisy. I never did see the bird leave. Presumably, whether or not successful, it would have left on a "low-trajectory", leaving the site (hopefully) heavily-laden and following the terrain back to the chicks...?! :ok:

500N
19th Mar 2014, 22:18
That eagle off the wing tip has the classic "shock horror" look and evade pose.

Both are great photos.

Mudman
20th Mar 2014, 12:25
Hi Airship thanks for the reply and the story about the hawk.

The OP confuses "other things that fly" maybe?

An eagle or other bird is not a "thing or object". Airplanes may indeed have souls like ships, but "naturally-flying" creatures should never be called mere "things".

I take your point. My reference to them as "things" is entirely tongue-in-cheek for the title of the thread. I have great respect for all the animals we handle as living creatures.

Cheers.
M

Worrals in the wilds
20th Mar 2014, 13:05
I remember when I was aged about 15 years old and walking home a few miles uphill from the main Darjeeling town late one afternoonBeen there! Beautiful place inhabited by lovely people. :ok: After travelling through the Delhi and Rajasthan craziness (in summer :ouch:) Darjeeling was incredibly serene, and I remember the birds, monkeys and the amazing vegetation. Coming from a very flat place I also remember the view DOWN the mountain, where you could see football fields that were the size of a stamp :eek:.

There was a good bookshop in town, too; I still treasure the Himalaya books I bought there and chatting about politics with the Gurkhas who ran it.

Darn, I want to travel now. :ugh::}

MagnusP
20th Mar 2014, 13:20
Oh dear, MudMan, chastised by airship. You poor thing. ;)

Great thread, thanks, I'm enjoying this.

Mudman
20th Mar 2014, 13:33
Yesterday the temperature finally rose above 0 enabling me to knock the ice out of the small wading pool and fill it. Here's what happened next...

GE74vt8ab6Q

500N
20th Mar 2014, 17:06
Mudman

Awesome, thanks for posting.

airship
20th Mar 2014, 18:46
0:04 the Eagle lands 10ft away from the bird-bath, surveys and reflects...
0:52 the Eagle finally decides to walk towards the bird-bath...
1:05 the Eagle arrives at the bird-bath...
2:44 the Eagle, having surveyed and reflected suitably, finally jumps up onto the edge of the bird-bath...
3:06 the Eagle finally jumps in and begins to bathe... ;)

It reminds me of when I lived as a quasi hermit for about 2 years back in the late 1980s in UK. From the only window of my 3rd floor room, I would see several hundreds of starlings congregating in the trees a hundred metres away. One day, I decided to try to "make friends". Put out a small bowl of water and a few slices of bread on the flat-roof outside...?! They were extremely cautious at first, but the more intrepid individuals eventually resulted in the water bowl being used as a bird-bath instead of just to drink out of. So I just put out an even bigger "bird-bath" sized water-bowl afterwards. Which had to be replaced / replenished several times a day. With the starlings, also came eventually other birds including Blackbirds, various thrushes, robins, tits and even once, a falcon or kestrel of some sort. The starlings, Blackbirds and thrushes would eventually take nibbles from my hand stretched out of the partially-open sash-window. They were all a very welcome distraction to life. And never a single complaint from the neighbours back then (here in France, when I've tried to feed a few pigeons and doves with leftovers, literally all the neighbours complained)... :sad:

Long live all flying thingies, and those that care for them... :ok:

Mudman
20th Mar 2014, 21:04
Thanks Airship. Birds are always on the lookout for a source of water. That sounded like a pretty cool experience. It reminded me of something I observed shortly after we began rehabilitating wild animals.

We had a small group of starling nestlings, five I think, that came from a nest a cat had dragged down and killed the parent. We had been hand raising them to the point where they had all fledged, becoming independent and exploring beyond the little bowl of towels that had become their new home.

We had a small screened canopy, about 10'x10' (3.5mx3.5m) that we were keeping them in in our garden. One sunny afternoon my wife decided to put a shallow dish of water in the canopy while the birds were poking in the grass nearby. When she began pouring the water, the sound acted as a trigger to some deeply ingrained instinct in the birds and all of them began to shudder and flutter as if they were bathing in water. Before this time they had never been near water other than the small dish we provided for drinking. The sound alone triggered the response. A few more trickles of water and the came over, hopped into the shall dish and began to bathe as the eagle did in the video above.

Their parent never taught them this, we certainly didn't, it was a completely instinctual response to the sound of running water.

One of the joys and privileges of doing this kind of work is seeing first hand and up close all manner of animal behaviour that I'd never normally see in daily life. How each species perceives and responds to threatening situations, how the eat, how they process food, the sounds they make, how they interact are all amazing to watch.

Cheers
M.

Hydromet
21st Mar 2014, 00:40
Fantastic!
A birdbath/water source seems to be the best way to bring birds around, pretty well anywhere. Just in our yard, we have kookaburras, crimson & eastern rosellas, king parrots, magpies, peewees (magpie larks), noisy miners, crested pigeons, sulphur crested cockatoos, galahs, butcher birds, brown pigeons and a small honey eater that I haven't been able to get close enough to to identify, all in suburban Sydney. Of course, we also have the invasive Indian mynahs, against whom I'm fighting a never-ending battle.
Twice, I've seen a pair of brown goshawks in action here. Once, one made an unsuccessful hit on a noisy miner, and the second time, successfully hit an Indian dove. In both cases, its mate sat on the telegraph pole across the road.
At the time of the unsuccessful hit, an Indian dove was hiding in an overturned flower pot and the miners were making a racket, so they obviously knew of the goshawks' presence.

Mudman
3rd Apr 2014, 22:04
We released two of our snowy owl patients yesterday. One came from North Sydney, the other named Titan after the fishing vessel it landed on 340 km SE of St. John's. Both flew confidently and strongly. We wish them well on their journey north. Here's a video clip of the release.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-oJ0Tn1WlPwk/Uz25wIVB0TI/AAAAAAAAGp4/6ZIHgWqEiHI/s912/Sydney%2520Snowy%2520Release%2520gopro%2520Still002.jpg

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-DmaWrqdW6Rs/Uz25wIpSp6I/AAAAAAAAGp0/RedPPVjJcjE/s912/Titan%2520Snowy%2520Release.Still003.jpg

Video
7csf3MQCIpk

Online Photo Album (https://picasaweb.google.com/112940540665752879148/SnowyOwlRelease2014?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJKXtoqakM7qYQ&feat=directlink)

airship
9th Apr 2014, 20:17
I was quite intrigued by this BBC report (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-norfolk-26952956) concerning a "rogue" female Peregrine falcon in Norwich (UK) which apparently succeeded in temporarily intimidating / dislodging the male from the nest and "threatening" to destroy the clutch of 4 eggs etc.

Perhaps I'm missing something? So far as I could understand, the eggs were not destroyed / or otherwise consumed by this "rogue" female despite repeated and "threatening" visits. Perhaps Peregrine falcons make a "natural" habit of simply visiting other "Peregrine" falcon nests as a matter of courtesy, curiosity, or similar?

"No animals, birds etc. were harmed during the making of this movie" (/ BBC report?). What's the news...?! :confused:

Too many bald eagles - watch the following YouTube video?!

4 19 2010 Two Eagles, A Fox and My Cats on My Porch Not Getting Along! - YouTube

Perhaps Mudman has an explanation...?!

Worrals in the wilds
10th Apr 2014, 01:55
What lovely owls! They're big birds, aren't they! We've rescued a couple of barn owls that got hit by vehicles, but one didn't make it. :sad:
I must admit the location confused me for a minute; I didn't realise there were two North Sydneys :\.

Mudman
12th Apr 2014, 02:54
What lovely owls! They're big birds, aren't they! We've rescued a couple of barn owls that got hit by vehicles, but one didn't make it.
I must admit the location confused me for a minute; I didn't realise there were two North Sydneys .

Hey Worrals, believe it or not we get people at least once every 2 years arriving in Sydney, Nova Scotia thinking they are arriving in Sydney, Australia. Quite the shock to realize they are a long way from each other and one is a lot smaller.

Mudman
12th Apr 2014, 03:11
I was quite intrigued by this BBC report concerning a "rogue" female Peregrine falcon in Norwich (UK) which apparently succeeded in temporarily intimidating / dislodging the male from the nest and "threatening" to destroy the clutch of 4 eggs etc.

One of my bird nerd friends wrote this..

Never heard of a peregrine doing anything to another's eggs, but good nest sites are highly prized and territorial battles are common, sometimes lethal. Any visiting peregrine I think would be assessing their chances of taking over and moving in.


As for the eagle, fox and cat story I heard that the home owner may have been feeding the eagles or the fox, or had been leaving food out for the cat which would attract the former if hungry enough.

Eagles are generally scavengers preferring road kill to live prey except for fish. The ones we have in our care will generally show a preference for one over the other which might suggest that where they are raised and what they are fed might influence their diet in adulthood.

Tarq57
12th Apr 2014, 10:34
Just saw the videos in the OP, and those that followed.

What a fantastic thread.

Love your work :ok:

Mudman
12th Apr 2014, 20:40
Just saw the videos in the OP, and those that followed.

What a fantastic thread.

Love your work

Thanks Tarq57

airship
25th Apr 2014, 18:23
Whilst many seek to protect and conserve wild birds, in Malta...

Migrant birds in Malta 'shot as trophies' (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-27109838), says Chris Packham in this BBC report.

Malta criticised for mass shooting of migratory birds (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-27108910), in this BBC report.

What is done (with so much dedication, involving personal sacrifice of one's own time and efforts), is rapidly undone...?! Which is the general way of things in 2014 :sad:

barit1
26th Apr 2014, 14:52
We are approaching the centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon (http://www.wildbirds.org/apidesay.htm).

500N
26th Apr 2014, 20:40
airship

Malta would be minute compared to what some of the other countries do
- Italy. Spain etc.

In the past the Italians killed literally anything that flew.