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Standby Scum
12th Mar 2014, 13:04
Man gets 14 years for lasing helicopter ... (http://blog.sfgate.com/crime/2014/03/10/man-gets-14-years-for-lasing-helicopter/)

tony draper
12th Mar 2014, 13:41
A Central Valley man who shined a laser pointer at a police helicopter
Shined? that should be shone surely.:uhoh:

Seldomfitforpurpose
12th Mar 2014, 13:57
Shouldn't it read Man gets 14 years for the straw that finally broke the camels back :confused:

Blacksheep
12th Mar 2014, 14:05
14 years is too lenient.

A Hellfire missile would soon put a stop to these laser wielding idiots. :E

The SSK
12th Mar 2014, 14:12
Thank you Mr D, now I'm frantically trying to remember a song in which 'shone' is pronounced 'shown'.

Aargh

OFSO
12th Mar 2014, 14:49
A Hellfire missile would soon put a stop to these [email protected] wielding idiots.

Against soft targets nothing so large and powerful would be necessary. I seem to remember a space-to-surface attack system using some kind of tracking device (laser detector, servo, fins) on the front of a solid metal rod with a short-duration solid thruster on the back. Wouldn't have to be very large if it was air-to-ground and it could be mounted on front of the engine pylon at the same height as the condensation trail spraying nozzle on the back. No explosive charge is necessary, as anyone who has had a metal rod rammed up their fundament can testify.

It could also be used to clear water buffalo from the runway (PK-YGM 737-200C 4th Jan 2005 Banda Aceh.)

handsfree
12th Mar 2014, 15:23
as anyone who has had a metal rod rammed up their fundament can testify.

I shall wait in anticipation as to who is brave enough to testify. :\

eastern wiseguy
12th Mar 2014, 15:39
Tony

Apparently


The transitive form of the verb “shine” is ”shined.” If the context describes something shining on something else, use “shined”: “He shined his flashlight on the skunk eating from the dog dish.” You can remember this because another sense of the word meaning “polished” obviously requires “shined”: “I shined your shoes for you.”

When the shining is less active, many people would use “shone”: “The sun shone on the tomato plants all afternoon.” But some authorities prefer “shined” even in this sort of context: “The sun shined on the tomato plants all afternoon.”

If the verb is intransitive (lacks an object) and the context merely speaks of the act of shining, the past tense is definitely “shone”: “The sun shone all afternoon” (note that nothing is said here about the sun shining on anything).

There you go.......
:ok:

awblain
12th Mar 2014, 15:41
Basil, US sentencing is extreme to European eyes.

500N
12th Mar 2014, 16:01
Bugger the hellfire, a few small FLECHETTE rockets should do it nicely,
and you wouldn't even need to actually hit him !!!

About time someone got a good one although I am sure someone will appeal and argue it is against his human rights !

Maybe 7 years and being flashed in the eyes by a [email protected] so he knows what he has done ?

tony draper
12th Mar 2014, 16:28
I dunno,it just do not sound right, it sounds the way a four year old child would word it, like, I swumed across the river,

OFSO
12th Mar 2014, 16:33
Once upon a time I had a wife who came from our formerly colonies...she would say "This needs washed" or "He squoze the toothpaste". I disremember (sic) the other expressions she used. Many of the phrases originated in Elisabethan English, died out in the homeland but are still in common use in Canada - or, strangely enough, in Chicago where I also had friends.

Of course Canadian French is even more medieval.

MadsDad
12th Mar 2014, 16:49
I seem to remember a space-to-surface attack system using some kind of tracking device (laser detector, servo, fins) on the front of a solid metal rod with a short-duration solid thruster on the back

Remember that as well - one of Larry Niven's books (which also included an 'Orion' space vehicle, powered by small nuclear bombs). The book involved an invasion by interstellar travelling small elephants (and whilst I may have had a pint this lunchtime I'm still on this planet).

There was also the 'J-SOWS' specified by Tom Clancy (in 'The Bear and the Dragon' I recall) which bore a more than passing resemblance to that system.

tony draper
12th Mar 2014, 16:57
Foot Fall Mr MadsDads? one if their books I did not find very convincing,:)

MadsDad
12th Mar 2014, 16:59
Thank you Mr. D, absobloodylutely correct.

Couldn't remember the title and it doesn't seem to be in my bookshelves. Now, who could I have lent that too.

603DX
12th Mar 2014, 17:04
Unless he was intentionally trying to disable the pilot

But isn't that the whole objective of these dangerous idiots? The lawyer's Latin tag "Res ipsa loquitur" (the thing speaks for itself) ought to apply to this criminal act. There is absolutely no innocent reason for aiming a laser at a piloted aircraft, the act is inherently malicious and hostile, a clear attempt to temporarily blind the crew and cause a crash.

Sir Niall Dementia
12th Mar 2014, 17:58
Basil;


I was subject to a laser attack on short finals to land at a well known heliport in Europe. Nearly killed me and 6 passengers due to the short term blinding. If you think 14 years is too harsh then what I would have done to the little scrote would have seemed extreme.


The aim of these idiots is to blind the pilot, the laser leaves an effect right afterwards like conjunctivitis for several minutes. It is basically an attempt at murder and quite frankly I see 14 years as way too short. The police here in the UK treat it as an attempt to kill, with the charge being "reckless and negligent endangerment of an aircraft and it's occupants", and rightly so.


If I ever meet one of these idiots I would love to drag his eyeballs out with my teeth and see how he gets on afterwards.


SND

Tankertrashnav
12th Mar 2014, 18:47
Shined? that should be shone surely

Tony, I see you dove straight in there ;)

However, I reckon Eastern Wiseguy has it right, no matter on which side of the Atlantic you live!

Mind you - lasing? That would only work if a laser was something that lased!

Oh bugger that PPRuNe pixie is at it again - how about L A S E R?

rgbrock1
12th Mar 2014, 18:51
If I ever meet one of these idiots I would love to drag his eyeballs out with my teeth and see how he gets on afterwards.

Now don't hold back. Tell us how you really feel. :}

I agree. Using a laser against any aircraft should be classified as a Class A felony (attempted murder) with a sentence of 20 years minimum. Assholes.

tony draper
12th Mar 2014, 18:55
I blame Tom Clancy,one of his characters used a laser to blind the pilot and scrag the aircraft in one of his books,I forget which now,nobody had probably thought of it until then.:rolleyes:

Flash2001
12th Mar 2014, 20:03
I'm with Tony on shone. T'other just don't sound right.

After an excellent landing etc...

500N
12th Mar 2014, 20:07
Re shone, shined, I would go with shone but it was interesting reading why it should be the other. Might be because language changes and we were told shone, others something else ?

tony draper
12th Mar 2014, 20:17
Bit like Fish I suppose,the correct plural is Fishes, but who the hell says 'I bought two fishes',though I do believe the Bible mentions five fishes at one point,but that was writ a long time ago.:rolleyes:

Saintsman
12th Mar 2014, 20:33
Fishes. What about Mongoose?

Mongooses doesn't sound right either, but Mongeese?

Sorry for the thread drift.

Standard Noise
12th Mar 2014, 21:16
"Basil, US sentencing is extreme to European eyes."


No, only to Basil eyes. I see no problem with it, laser attacks on aircraft are a PITA in the UK too, a few 14yr sentences might make the little piteshots think again.

TomJoad
12th Mar 2014, 21:35
Miscreant appears to have a bit of form but 14 years? Unless he was intentionally trying to disable the pilot, I'd say that's a bit excessive.

Must admit that was my first thoughts. I know of one conviction in the UK and the sentence was nowhere near as severe. I wonder if there is a 9/11 influence or if this is a genuine attempt to send a message to what must be a growing problem. The handheld laser pointer is ubiquitous and more frighteningly the high power of devices available over the internet is a worry in potential assault cases. I know it wouldn't solve the problem but maybe we need to start licensing these things.

ExSp33db1rd
12th Mar 2014, 22:39
Unless he was intentionally trying to disable the pilot,

Why else would anyone do it ?

Maybe Shariah Law ( an eye for an eye ) would sort it out, tie up the idiots and shine a laser into their eyes until they go blind ?

G-CPTN
12th Mar 2014, 23:10
Although I in no way condone the act of shoning a laser pointer at an aircraft, I suspect that the culprits are 'simply' seeing how far the beam will travel, and an aircraft is one of the distant objects that is available for this exercise.
It probably doesn't occur to them that the effect could be to blinden the pilot (or, indeed, any passenger).
The result is no less dangerous of course - just as thrusting a stick into the spokes of a bicycle wheel might seem to be an explorative action - but could nevertheless unseat the rider.

I had to speak very very sternly to my 4-year-old grandson who tried to stick his fingers into the spokes of his bicycle as I spun the wheel as I tried to free up the wheel from a brake that was binding, preventing him from riding it properly.

Tankertrashnav
13th Mar 2014, 00:46
Fish - fishes

At school I remember being taught that fish (plural) implied that the fish were all of the same type, but fishes meant that they were of different varieties.

Absolutely no idea if there was any basis for this, maybe our teacher was just making it up!

Discussed "shone - shined" with Mrs TTN over dinner tonight and she went with shined when transitive and shone when intransitive. (I shined my shoes and when I finished they shone).

Incidentally when did "snog" switch from intransitive to transitive? When I was a lad we used to snog with a girl - now they snog girls. I prefer the former - seems more consensual to me!

All of which has sod-all to do with lasers!

redsnail
13th Mar 2014, 00:59
Been zapped approaching Farnborough and Ciampino.
A real pain and a bloody nuisance. So far, been too high to do any damage.

I'd happily kick the [email protected] wielders until they saw sense. :mad:

419
13th Mar 2014, 03:02
I'm not sure what they could snare the scrotes with in the UK to enable a proper sentence to be passed

Provided that a judge had the balls to dish out the maximum allowed, this should do it:



PART D Provisions referred to in article 241(8)
Article of Order.................. Subject Matter
137.................................. Endangering safety of an aircraft

(8) Any person who contravenes any provision specified in Part D of Schedule 13 is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum and on conviction on indictment to a fine or imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or both.

The Air Navigation Order 2009 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/3015/contents/made)

Not quite the 14 years given in the US, but a couple of scrotes sentenced to 5 years might make others think before they do the same.

onetrack
13th Mar 2014, 03:32
14 years doesn't sound long enough for me, for what was essentially multiple counts of attempted murder.
Personally, I reckon pilots (well, chopper pilots, anyway) should be given welding goggles and a high powered rifle, and be fully authorised to punch a few rounds into the laser source.
You'd only have to do it few times and the problem would be virtually eliminated.

david1300
13th Mar 2014, 04:29
In keeping with the thread drift:
G-CPTN: "It probably doesn't occur to them that the effect could be to blinden the pilot (or, indeed, any passenger).

"blinden":eek: I didn't ever see'd that word before :sad:

JimNtexas
13th Mar 2014, 05:58
Just a note from Deep in the Heart of Texas, where the sun shines bright.

In most US state courts a 14 year sentence would probably really require only 5 to 7 years of actual incarceration in a red state, less in a blue state.

In the U.S. Federal system, where this buffoon was tried, there is no parole, no reduction for 'good time'.

The buffoon is really going spend 14 years reflecting on the fun he had with his toy.

birrddog
13th Mar 2014, 07:50
Maybe 7 years and being flashed in the eyes by a [email protected] so he knows what he has done ?

An eye for an eye..... Seems fitting...

Pelikal
13th Mar 2014, 11:10
'Fishes and Chips Shop' doesn't sound quite right though.

rgbrock1
13th Mar 2014, 15:02
I wonder what the effect a mirror would have on the laser holder, if any?

According to a report I read recently (FAA), here in the U.S. there were 4,000 laser attacks on commercial aircraft last year. Or, on average, 11 per day.
The attacks are common in NY (JFK) and Los Angeles (LAX).

According to a report summary by the Effa-Be-Eye (FBI) it is only a matter of time before a laser attack causes an accident.

(The average age of a "laser attacker" is in the mid-teens or early 30's and are 99% male. For whatever that's worth.)

awblain
13th Mar 2014, 15:52
The radar equation sadly protects the laser-firing scrote from reflective attack. Intensity falls as distance to the mirror to the fourth power.

Jhieminga
13th Mar 2014, 16:09
I blame Tom Clancy,one of his characters used a [email protected] to blind the pilot and scrag the aircraft in one of his books,I forget which now,nobody had probably thought of it until then.:rolleyes:
In 'Debt of Honor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debt_of_Honor)' they use a 'high intensity light' for this purpose. Perhaps that's the one you're thinking of...

G-CPTN
13th Mar 2014, 16:37
"blinden":eek: I didn't ever see'd that word before :sad:It was used in the spirit of the earlier discussion - as was shoning . . .

Sir Niall Dementia
13th Mar 2014, 23:56
Basil;


I have to admire your curiosity, but trust me its' not worth trying!


SND

Cacophonix
14th Mar 2014, 00:06
The fools that commit these sorts of crime are generally just that. The apprehended should be asked to pass a course in optics and the equivalent of an undergraduate course in photogrammetry and laser technology. Those who pass go free, the dullards sew mail bags...

That'll show them...

Caco

onetrack
14th Mar 2014, 03:07
One has to ask - a non-owner or user of a high-powered laser - just what is the purpose or substantiated use of one? If there's a basically singular and express purpose of use for the item, shouldn't severe restrictions on ownership and useage be introduced (such as restrictions on military-style weapons in civilian hands)?

It seems to me every clown and his brain-dead mate can buy one of these direct from China, without any real restrictions - when the importation and ownership of such item without good cause (and a showing of intelligence and responsibility) should be initiated immediately, as a matter of aviation safety priorities?

In the U.S., there's a myriad of laws relating to misuse of laser pointers. It seems NJ is the only state with a degree of sense, in having laws that seriously restrict ownership of them - thus attacking the problem at its source.

Laser Pointer Safety - U.S. laws for lasers and pointers (http://www.laserpointersafety.com/rules-general/uslaws/uslaws.html)

500N
14th Mar 2014, 03:31
One Track

Until the law came in in Aus restricting the power of them, people purchased them as [email protected] pointers and for rifles and pistols - quite powerful one's.

They still do buy them but they are restricted in power and since I don't go around shining them in people's eyes, not sure how far they "hurt" but they still "dazzle" even at longer range.

spittingimage
14th Mar 2014, 10:04
Had Plod round at my door earlier this week, informing me (and neighbours) that anti-social youths locally had progressed to pointing these laser thingys at local motorists now. Suggested I keep a good lookout ... :uhoh:

tony draper
14th Mar 2014, 10:15
During those riots that broke out in the sandy places the last few years,seemed to be a lot of lasers being "shone"about.:rolleyes: