PDA

View Full Version : Women sues over seagull 'swoop'


superq7
11th Mar 2014, 22:57
I can't believe this ! she's claiming 30,000 see this link.

BBC News - Woman sues over 'terrifying' seagull swoop at Greenock building (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-26533246)

TomJoad
11th Mar 2014, 23:06
I can't believe this ! she's claiming 30,000 see this link.

BBC News - Woman sues over 'terrifying' seagull swoop at Greenock building (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-26533246)

Utterly bizzare:rolleyes:

awblain
11th Mar 2014, 23:19
If the birds were nesting on the owners' building, and diving on people going in and out, then the owners should prevent them from doing that.

However, it's not clear what the damage she suffered is. A twisted ankle is worth 30,000? That's what's bizarre, and she was off work for two weeks? Don't they have crutches in Greenock?

Sallyann1234
11th Mar 2014, 23:42
The court heard how as Mrs Kelly turned to go back inside her left shoe came off and she stumbled onto the steps.
It would be interesting to know what sort of shoes she was wearing to navigate those steps.

TomJoad
11th Mar 2014, 23:49
I'd be asking if the seagull was appropriately trained and authorised.:E

SARF
11th Mar 2014, 23:58
I'm fairly sure they can't remove wildlife from any where unless a windmill is being built ?

Lantern10
12th Mar 2014, 00:14
It would be interesting to know what sort of shoes she was wearing to navigate those steps.

Obviously not "sensible" ones:confused:

Noah Zark.
12th Mar 2014, 02:09
Mrs Ann Walsh, manager with Enterprise Childcare, who also works in the Ladyburn business centre, said the gull problem had been going on for years.

"I was attacked myself by gulls," she said. "I was poo-ed on as part of the attack."

As Hogmany -Melchett warns in Blackadder - "Never poo poo a poo poo!"

onetrack
12th Mar 2014, 04:29
Attacking, thieving, useless seagulls, who shit on you, make for an excellent combination with aggressive lawyers - who largely operate on the same basis. :suspect:

UniFoxOs
12th Mar 2014, 09:18
If the birds were nesting on the owners' building, and diving on people going in and out, then the owners should prevent them from doing that.

Unfortunately some complete and utter [email protected] has made them a protected species, soo there's FA one can do.

awblain
12th Mar 2014, 09:23
They can install nets, spikes etc.

If seagulls are nesting on the building, pigeons are presumably crawling everywhere on it too it seems unlikely that it's a nice place to work on the outside of, or that the ventilation air intakes are guano-free.

MagnusP
12th Mar 2014, 09:27
I'm told by someone involved in the case that one advocate asked a witness "Do you find many chicks in the car park?" :}

oopspff7
12th Mar 2014, 10:46
I hope the gull was wearing a high viz vest...

Worrals in the wilds
12th Mar 2014, 11:01
They can install nets, spikes etc. Or if all else fails put up warning signs. These are common enough in Australia. As Henry points out, most of the time the dive is a scare tactic rather than an actual attack, though it can be scary if you're not expecting it.
http://www.ozanimals.com/image/albums/australia/Bird/normal_200411210021.jpg
From the article it sounds like the nearby dump should be taking some ownership of the problem, if they haven't already. Spraying the rubbish can help, as can netting it.

Molemot
12th Mar 2014, 11:04
I remember a fishmonger in Teignmouth who got so fed up with the depradations of seagulls nicking fish off his slab that he took his shotgun to them....ran into the street shouting at them and then loosed off both barrels blowing two of them to rags. Fined 10 for "discharging a firearm in a public place", iirc. Many years ago, this was....(!)

mattpilot
12th Mar 2014, 11:17
I suppose one could always take that mission to Mars if they find there's to much 'biology' on the planet they are on.

Exascot
12th Mar 2014, 11:20
I got badly damaged by a Seagull on Saturday. My gardener was lowering it into place and I was guiding into the bracket on the transom of the boat when a nut came loose and it catapulted up and hit me across the head. I can see her point there really should not be outboard engines flying all over the place. :p

500N
12th Mar 2014, 11:24
Why you'd make the seagull a protected species, god only knows, no shortage of them in the UK and in some ways they are a pest, a big pest where other birds and nests are concerned.

Worrals in the wilds
12th Mar 2014, 12:06
Only if you get caught...:E
Dunno about the UK, but in Australia a protected species is a native animal, as opposed to a feral , i.e. introduced species. That doesn't mean that protected animals can't be culled or relocated, it just means that you need a permit to do so. The permit conditions usually require that you have a legitimate reason for removing them (such as crop damage or a safety risk) and that you use non-lethal methods wherever practical.

With feral animals, a landowner has a duty to remove them; in other words they are expected to cull them. If your property has a feral animal problem (such as foxes, hares or wild dogs) that causes issues for your neighbours or their livestock, you are supposed to mitigate that.

I realise it's probably a bit messy in the UK wrt what's introduced and what's native, but the point I'm trying to make :O is that just because an animal is protected doesn't necessarily mean that it can't be touched. Down here it just means that there's more paperwork to go through before you do so.

VP959
12th Mar 2014, 17:31
Many years ago a friend showed me a way to get rid of annoying gulls. All it takes is some calcium carbide and a few slices of fresh white bread. Stick a small lump of carbide on a bit of bread, and fold it over and crimp it together, like making a pasty. Chuck the morsel into the air, where one of these aerial rats is bound to catch it, then step back to a safe distance. Within a minute or so one will be rewarded by the sight of the said aerial rat suffering a mid-air explosion, as the carbide releases acetylene in the creatures innards.

I can't for the life of me see how gulls have become protected. Their numbers seem to have multiplied enormously, even on site well inland and away from the sea. They're a public nuisance in many places, worse than pigeons.

RedhillPhil
12th Mar 2014, 18:27
Those Glasgow people come downriver to the pastoral beauty of fair Greenock and then complain - tsk!

The gulls can be a bit aggressive. Watched a chap in West Stewart Street being attacked. He dealt with the assault by shouting: "Ah ya bas!" and running for it :}


I believe that it used to be referred to as going, "doon the watter".

Tankertrashnav
12th Mar 2014, 18:41
However, it's not clear what the damage she suffered is. A twisted ankle is worth 30,000? That's what's bizarre, and she was off work for two weeks?


Actually Awblain, I am surprised it's such a modest claim. It's not that long since an RAF typist got 480,000 for repetitive strain injury to her thumb as she used her work computer!

awblain
12th Mar 2014, 21:36
RSI can be a debilitating, permanent injury, and if it was caused by her workplace being badly setup and supervised, then I can see a substantial settlement being in order.

Tripping over your own feet isn't in the same category.

pigboat
13th Mar 2014, 00:16
If the birds were nesting on the owners' building, and diving on people going in and out, then the owners should prevent them from doing that.

Damn, I could have sued Pittsburg Plate Glass for getting shat on by one of their bloody pigeons.

500N
13th Mar 2014, 00:23
"Their numbers seem to have multiplied enormously, even on site well inland and away from the sea. They're a public nuisance in many places, worse than pigeons."

Even I the 70's around Staffordshire when we were catching swans and geese, huge flocks of sea gulls existed, a lot of it due to the rubbish dumps and close by water ways - Cannock Chase being one.

The other way is bread and sleeping tablets (of course out of sight of the public), then pick up the sleeping gull and drop them on the road to make it look like road kill.

Tankertrashnav
13th Mar 2014, 00:27
RSI can be a debilitating, permanent injury, and if it was caused by her workplace being badly setup and supervised, then I can see a substantial settlement being in order.




Getting both your legs blown off by an IED is also a permanent, debilitating injury, but it won't net you almost half a mil, or anything like.

My point was there is absolutely no logic in the mad compensation culture world we now live in

pigboat
13th Mar 2014, 04:58
My point was there is absolutely no logic in the mad compensation culture world we now live in.
Thank the tort lawyers.

bosnich71
13th Mar 2014, 05:13
VP959 .... your method was reputedly used at RAF St.Athan in the 60s'. Never saw it myself but would have liked to have.
Ref. Seagulls,the lady from Greenock should try living in Dartmouth,Devon.Now that really is Bird Shit territory.

bosnich71
13th Mar 2014, 05:16
Worrals... I don't mind Magpies as they only seem to get wound up at certain times of the year. But Plovers,I really hate the b******s, they are mongrels all the time.

chksix
13th Mar 2014, 08:46
Keep destroying their nests as they build them. After a while they stop trying and move on.

Worrals in the wilds
13th Mar 2014, 10:56
Plovers suck. :{ Sociapathic little birds with an anger management problem.
Thank the tort lawyers. Has there been any negligence reform in the UK? The reason I ask is that over the last ten years or so negligence has been codified in Australia, with various Civil Liability Acts that limit payments. Has that happened in the UK or is it still decided case by case? :8:confused:

awblain
13th Mar 2014, 11:03
Tanker…

Getting both your legs blown off by an IED is also a permanent, debilitating injury, but it won't net you almost half a mil, or anything like.

You are correct, and I agree that the RSI claim is probably excessive, although we don't know any of the details.

Sadly, soldiers are from time to time subject to workplace injury. Their employers try to reduce the effects, but it can still happen. This is less true for a typist, for whom RSI should be watched for and pre-empted.

Now, say the maimed MRAP rider was in a vehicle with a huge manufacturing defect that focussed the blast on their legs: do they have a claim?

pigboat
13th Mar 2014, 13:24
WEvsqspmnW4

RJM
13th Mar 2014, 23:04
Thank the tort lawyers.

pigboat is quite right. Blame in particular Lord Denning, who started the ridiculous expansion of the law if negligence with his cry-baby judgement in Donahue v Stevenson in the 1930's, a ruling which lawyers have been dining on ever since.

First the whinging woman has to prove a duty of care, then a breach of it, ie failure to take reasonable precautions on the part of the defendant - which might be hard. Then there's the question of her contributory negligence. Let's hope the defence is up to it.

Cacophonix
13th Mar 2014, 23:41
I wonder if one could sue the Shetland Islands Council for the vicious, hair raising nature of their terns whose perpetual state of enraged feathered fury is enough to make even this man quail...

Always asquawk, those turnish bastards are the most vicious birds known in Christendom aside from those girls I once met in that bar in Swansea...

Caco

lomapaseo
14th Mar 2014, 01:37
next time duck

Pinky the pilot
14th Mar 2014, 02:08
aside from those girls I once met in that bar in Swansea...

Do tell, Caco.:ok::E:ooh:

MagnusP
14th Mar 2014, 09:34
Caco, if you don't like the arctic terns (tirricks) in Shetland, I suggest you go and make the aquaintance of the bonxies (great skuas). Bigger, badder, and they puke and crap on you as well.

vulcanised
14th Mar 2014, 13:51
A teacher threw a DVD at a boy, causing a "slight cut above his eyebrow" - paid over 15k compensaion by County Council :ugh:

rgbrock1
14th Mar 2014, 14:15
500N wrote:

huge flocks of sea gulls existed

They still do exist bro'!

http://www.rick.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/a-flock-of-seagulls.jpg