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superq7
1st Feb 2014, 11:11
I recently sent two quite important text messages too a client he claims not to have received them I'm sure in the past if a message didn't for some reason get through it would come back as " not delivered " or words to that effect, any ideas ? thanks stu.

Keef
1st Feb 2014, 11:16
I've had one returned undelivered months after I sent it.
I don't think they do that any more - try sending one to an old and defunct number of yours, to see what happens.

Capetonian
1st Feb 2014, 11:26
I occasionally get a warning 'message not delivered to xxxxx' but it's not an actual message ino the inbox and therefore is not permanent.

Windy Militant
1st Feb 2014, 11:28
About two years ago we had a guy start with us. He went on his first long distance Job to Newcastle. I was on standby on the phone in case he had any problems. I texted him to say I was leaving the office in fifteen minutes so if he needed me to call now.
He sent a reply to that text saying he was OK, I'm still waiting to get it. :rolleyes:

OFSO
1st Feb 2014, 14:46
Yes, SMS do occasionally disappear. Even more mistifying are the ones that take up to 24 hours to arrive. Where have they been all that time ?

dazdaz1
1st Feb 2014, 15:08
NSA? GCHQ? :E:E

Windy Militant
1st Feb 2014, 15:11
I'll ask the guy's at Menwith Hill to have a look and see if it's stuck behind the server then!

G-CPTN
1st Feb 2014, 15:21
Texts do disappear or spend ages (ie days) before being delivered.

Another thing that has happened is I get notification that a text has arrived (from a contact) but when I open it it disappears. Being from a contact I can ask them to resend it. Might be associated with 'memory full' ? - though the resend usually arrives OK :confused:

mattpilot
1st Feb 2014, 15:24
My standard response to emails/texts/etc.. i've *ignored/forgot about/didn't care about* is always "didn't get it". Seems to get my neck out of the noose ;-).

G-CPTN
1st Feb 2014, 15:34
The Fax machine (although dwindling in popularity) remains the only legal method of rapid communication, as the message is transmitted without change and there is an acknowledgement of receipt of the message.

Solicitors' offices still have them.

Why the fax machine refuses to die - Fortune Tech (http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2013/05/15/why-the-fax-machine-refuses-to-die/)

radeng
1st Feb 2014, 16:32
eMails can disappear as well - either permanently or for a considerable period of time. There was an article about that some years back in the IEEE Spectrum magazine.

MadsDad
1st Feb 2014, 16:55
A few years back I was working for a well-known mobile phone company named, at the time, after a colour. Anyway there was a problem in that one of the mail servers failed but no-one in ops noticed this for several months. Eventually the problem was noticed, someone kicked it back into life and it resumed its duties. The effect was that all the messages that should have been routed via this server had been sent TO it but not FROM it and so when it was restarted there was a torrent of e-mails, up to 5 months old, suddenly released.

ExSp33db1rd
1st Feb 2014, 18:48
I can't be bothered with all those fiddly little buttons, so have a programme that lets me type TXTS on the computer keyboard, Skype offer it, but won't "recognise" my cellphone 'cos of some protocol affecting NZ telecoms, so I can only use it with a NZ programme within NZ, which works - sometimes.

2 coconut halves connected by string was much more reliable.

World's Gone Mad !

The Nr Fairy
1st Feb 2014, 18:53
Perhaps a touche too late, but perhaps if the message was important enough it may have been more reliably transmitted in a phone call and not via a mechanism which is known to fail from time to time...

Nervous SLF
1st Feb 2014, 19:06
Perhaps a touche too late, but perhaps if the message was important enough it may have been more reliably transmitted in a phone call and not via a mechanism which is known to fail from time to time...


:eek: Using logic on J.B. could get you into trouble you know. :):):)

herman the crab
1st Feb 2014, 22:38
Think there is or was also a setting for how long the text is 'valid' so if it's not delivered in that time frame it disappears?

I seem to recall setting mine to never expire or something.

HTC

parabellum
1st Feb 2014, 23:49
I have found that Whatsapp and Viber are more reliable than SMS via the Telco. Both apps. are free for the first year with a low charge thereafter.


www.whatsapp.com (http://www.whatsapp.com)


www.viber.com (http://www.viber.com)

India Four Two
2nd Feb 2014, 02:45
If both parties have an iPhone, you can send SMS messages via iMessage (free), which has the advantage of giving you a receipt. If there is no Internet connection, it falls back to sending via the phone company.

bob2s
2nd Feb 2014, 03:31
If both parties have a phone,then why not ring!:O

finfly1
2nd Feb 2014, 04:24
"If both parties have a phone,then why not ring!"

A fair question, and one I have asked for years.

Patiently it has been explained to me that one party may be somewhere (church, court, school etc) where they are unable to answer or speak on a phone. The text message can alert them to make a phone call when able.

Further, if something like directions are involved, sending them via text obviates the need for the receiving party to find something to write them down.

MG23
2nd Feb 2014, 06:08
If both parties have a phone,then why not ring!:O

I've had texts not delivered for no reason we could determine. In our case, the message is sent that way because the customer enters a problem report on a web site, then whoever is on call gets a text message telling them to log in to the customer site and figure out what's gone wrong. We don't want to have someone reading the web site and calling us to pass the details on through Chinese whispers.

SpringHeeledJack
2nd Feb 2014, 06:40
If both parties have a phone,then why not ring!

You old fashioned or wot mate ? It's digital innit ? One has oft lamented on the yoof-ification of adults (some of that is good, 60 being the new 40 etc) , but to send impossibly long texts, perhaps over several texts, rather than phone for a minute or less, assuming that one isn't in the church/court/boss's office :rolleyes: is a nonsense. A short message is totally practical and good practice, the 'clue' is in the moniker SMS (Short Messaging Service).

Regarding lost texts, I'm sure that most of them are caused by faulty switching equipment as described in an earlier post, I had a period where texts that had been sent to/from me, arrived a year later on an ad hoc basis over months. The monitoring of texts by any spy agency is done in real time and therefore they have no need to hold the text from the unaware keyboard warrior :suspect::hmm: As has been said, most cases of 'missing/lost text' are we hoomans doing our best to avoid confrontation/obligation/promises :E



SHJ

ExSp33db1rd
2nd Feb 2014, 06:54
.......where they are unable to answer or speak on a phone. The text message can alert them to make a phone call when able.

But they don't, they gaze at their phone and totally ignore you, the only advantage is that the txt reception tone is - usually - far shorter than the ring tone, so the film, sermon, conversation is not disturbed for so long.

The next breed of women will be born with a third hand - to permanently hold their mobile phone.

Inventions of the Devil, the lot of them, what was wrong with queing in the rain, clutching tuppence, outside the phone box - to actually SPEAK to someone ?

We survived.

SpringHeeledJack
2nd Feb 2014, 07:04
The next breed of women will be born with a third hand - to permanently hold their mobile phone.

:D:D:D:} The female of the species seems to be totally addicted to the devices, within arm's reach at ALL times. I'm of the mind that the constant connectivity with everyone else functions at the cost of being connected to oneself. I find one of the simple pleasures of life (remember them ?) is having time to lament on one's existence/contemplate.



SHJ

mattpilot
2nd Feb 2014, 07:38
But they don't, they gaze at their phone and totally ignore you, the only advantage is that the txt reception tone is - usually - far shorter than the ring tone, so the film, sermon, conversation is not disturbed for so long.

Is it no longer customary to set your phone on silent/vibrate when going to places such as churches/movies/meetings ?

Does the burden of not disrupting the people around me now fall onto the person trying to call .... err.. "connect with" me ... ?

:ugh: :D :rolleyes:


Taking it a step further ... what if i send a SMS to someone asking if they are available for a phone call, and assuming they are not, do they then have to send a SMS back in 5-10 minutes asking if i'm now available?

At what point is it acceptable to actually call ? :E

treadigraph
2nd Feb 2014, 08:03
"The female of the species seems to be totally addicted to the devices, within arm's reach at ALL times."


Big sister and I are looking after our elderly mum at the moment - last night my niece rang sister's mobile phone, sister passed her to over mum who settled down for a very long ramble with her favourite grandchild. After a while I noticed sister, deprived of her phone, was clutching the hands free landline phone...

OFSO
2nd Feb 2014, 08:20
The next breed of women

Inventions of the Devil, the lot of them


You said it, ExSp !

cattletruck
2nd Feb 2014, 10:40
SMS was originally spawned as a simple 'out-of-band' AT modem command for mobile networks. The limit of 160 characters was because the command interpreter (GSM) could only handle fixed line lengths and air network packets were small.

SMS does not use a robust delivery protocol. Its success is due to telco companies wide network coverage and users habit of leaving their phones on. The telcos may hold onto undelivered SMSs for a short while out of courtesy, and sometimes behind the scenes maintenance of the telco network may yield unexpected results including loss of SMSs or old ones reappearing.

Now that telco data traffic is effectively becoming TCP/IP based (4G) it's laughable that we still persist with the SMS protocol when there are so many other messaging systems around that are much more reliable.

If it's really important then follow up your SMS with a phone call after about 10 minutes.

SawMan
2nd Feb 2014, 13:54
If it's important then phone, don't text. That way there can be no miscommunication and anything which may need clarification can be done immediately. And with the instant reply you know your message got through.

If the sender or receiver of a SMS drops cell coverage momentarily the message may not go through. The sender usually gets a SMS from the service provider when this occurs, but you cannot know what condition the receiver is in. Voice is handled nearly instantly, but on a busy network a SMS may be held till there's an opening for it. Since it's much smaller data-wise, it generally finds a spot and goes out quickly. Once sent, it may drop from the system or it may be verified that the receiving phone did or did not get it and resent if necessary.

In the emergency communications situation I sometimes deal with I have every possible method of communications available to me, yet for all of the most important messages there is only one method universally accepted as certain- voice in plain language. Even though there is a possibility of misunderstanding, it is the only method other than Fax that is positively verifiable as having gotten the message through on both ends once it's been logged.

SMS and other written messaging should be reserved for the unimportant and for it's easy way of passing things like phone numbers, addresses, and easy-to-misunderstand important data, and then verified upon receipt by sending the important parts back in whole. This takes twice the network services and twice the time from two people. Data-based comms also requires your full attention be focused on it to read it, and with you not knowing the receiver's situation you may distract them from something more important, but most of us can talk and do something else with relative safety, focusing on either as the situation demands. Use SMS and data-based comms as an adjunct to voice comms if it matters, and if it doesn't matter why are you communicating in the first place?

gileraguy
2nd Feb 2014, 16:32
Sorry cptn, but emails are legal transactions since 2000 in Aussie!


See the Electronic Transactions Act 2000...

A mate went all the way to the Full Bench of the Supreme Court on a civil email matter...