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G&T ice n slice
31st Jan 2014, 15:32
... on a night like this...


bad weather always promted this was a saying of me mum's (born Wallsend, brought up in Hessle, worked in Churh Mission in the East end of Hull in the late 1930's early 1940's) .

And looking at the shipping forecast...
Sole
Gale Warning: Gale warning issued 31 January 03:17 UTC (Open)

Southwesterly gale force 8 imminent veering westerly and increasing storm force 10 soon

Southwest 6 to gale 8, veering west 7 to severe gale 9, occasionally storm 10.

Rough or very rough, becoming high or very high, occasionally phenomenal later in west.

Rain or squally showers.

Moderate or poor.

Fastnet
Gale Warning: Gale warning issued 31 January 09:52 UTC (Open)

Severe gale force 9 veering westerly and decreasing gale force 8 imminent, increasing storm force 10 later

South, veering west or southwest, 7 to severe gale 9, occasionally storm 10 later.

Very rough or high, becoming very high, and phenomenal later.

Rain or squally showers.

Moderate or poor.

Shannon
Gale Warning: Gale warning issued 31 January 03:17 UTC (Open)

Southerly severe gale force 9 veering westerly and decreasing gale force 8 imminent but increasing violent storm force 11 later

West 6 to gale 8, increasing severe gale 9 to violent storm 11.

Very rough or high, becoming phenomenal later.

Squally showers.

Poor becoming very poor.

Airey Belvoir
31st Jan 2014, 15:38
And this is what it looks like.....


earth wind map (http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-13.48,42.86,403)

Krystal n chips
31st Jan 2014, 16:02
Four letters..... R.N.L.I..... who get called as we know when it all goes for a can of worms....:ok:..... Because you wouldn't get me out in those conditions quite frankly and, I suspect, not many others on here either.

And any other vessel out in these conditions for that matter.....they can't exactly divert due to wx. can they.

G&T ice n slice
31st Jan 2014, 16:05
East Northern Section
Storm warning issued 31 January 08:00 UTC (Open)

At 310000UTC, low 56 north 27 west 955 expected 56 north 17 west 942 by 010000UTC.

Cyclonic becoming northwesterly gale 8 to storm 10, but violent storm 11 or hurricane force 12 in far south and southwest.

Very rough or high becoming high or very high and phenomenal for a time in far south.

Occasional rain or wintry showers.

Moderate or poor.

goudie
31st Jan 2014, 16:07
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1lqHRufgI8

I feel queezy just looking at this

G&T ice n slice
31st Jan 2014, 16:10
and I get seasick if the water in the bath sloshes around ...

Me dad were in frigates in the war, they used to class bad weather as when the waves went over the top of the funnel...

G-CPTN
31st Jan 2014, 16:39
Nights like this remind me of the 1950s when we went to stay with friends at Runswick Bay (near Whitby). When the maroon went off to summon the lifeboat crew we would rush down to the lifeboat house to watch the launch then hang around waiting for the return.

I offer this:-
1KCiMdR1ox0


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/36/Runswick_Bay_lifeboat_station_and_foreshore_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1093034.jpg

Ancient Mariner
31st Jan 2014, 16:46
As a sailor I always enjoyed bad better, the worse the better.
Per

lomapaseo
31st Jan 2014, 17:25
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1lqHRufgI8 (http://apicdn.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&key=1e857e7500cdd32403f752206c297a3d&loc=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pprune.org%2Fjet-blast%2F533082-heaven-help-sailors.html&out=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DA1lqHRufgI8&ref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pprune.org%2Fjet-blast-16%2F)

I feel queezy just looking at this

It gives me the shivvers just thinking that the water level video must have been from a Zodiac

tony draper
31st Jan 2014, 17:29
Unless your tied up to the quay in a safe port much better off out deep sea when it gets lumpy,it's the proximity of land during unpleasant weather that's the biggest hazard to ships.
Turn your pointy end to the sea ring down for half ahead, wedge yerself in your bunk wi a bottle of Gordons Gin and you've cracked it.
:rolleyes:

Lon More
31st Jan 2014, 19:13
not just the sailors. Today in 1953 the dikes broke and a huge part of the Netherlands was flooded, more than 1800 killed and 100000 homeless then

tony draper
31st Jan 2014, 19:51
I remember those floods a few died in the UK as well,someone suggested today we should invite the Dutch to look at our flooding problem,they are the past masters at water engineering.
:uhoh:

500N
31st Jan 2014, 20:01
"someone suggested today we should invite the Dutch to look at our flooding problem,they are the past masters at water engineering."

Before asking them, do the basics that from what I have read haven't been done for a few years, like dredging.

The UK used to flood in parts on a semi regular basis in the past, it just seems by looking at it that it is now occurring more often.

Checkboard
31st Jan 2014, 20:38
It gives me the shivvers just thinking that the water level video must have been from a Zodiac
Haha - I don't think it would be a zodiac, unless it was a BIG steel one in the same fleet :)

Lon More
31st Jan 2014, 21:26
Before asking them, do the basics that from what I have read haven't been done for a few years, like dredging.
not going to help everywhere, and who's going to pay for it. From your previous posts you don't expect the Government to fork out do you? In the Netherlands dredging is not seen as the best solution,: the rivers are now allowed to more or less reeclaim their old winter beds where possible

My understanding is that the farmers, by improving the drainage on their land have not helped the problem and also that too much construction is also to blame. Every new supermarket that e.g. Tesco build, complete with a huge car park reduces the ability of the area to absorb the rain

cavortingcheetah
31st Jan 2014, 21:35
If Britain were surrounded with a pleasantly castellated and guarded sea wall there would't be anywhere near the immigrant problems there are at the moment and the sea would be keep at bay as well.

G&T ice n slice
31st Jan 2014, 21:36
Just had beer & supper with the neighbor who's ex RN Subs.

"ah" says he "we didn't have problems with weather"

Fox3WheresMyBanana
31st Jan 2014, 22:00
I've been in the North Sea in a Force 10 in a 34' yacht. Fortunately the skipper had done the RTW and was used to Force 12. He didn't look worried, so the rest of us were reassured. Military yacht, well built & serviced.

Mind you, two other boats started breaking up, but were fortunately rescued by oilrig support vessels.

The worst bit was trying to go to the heads - life in a washing machine (and a violently out-of-balance one at that)

Hydromet
31st Jan 2014, 22:04
Remember seeing a documentary on the RNLI a few years ago. In the conditions they go out in, I would much prefer to be tucked up safely in bed.

Lon, my grandparents had a coffee-table book about the recovery from those 1953 floods. Lots of B&W photos of students doing civil works with not much machinery. Not sure where they got it from, nor where it went after they died.

RedhillPhil
31st Jan 2014, 23:20
If Britain were surrounded with a pleasantly castellated and guarded sea wall there would't be anywhere near the immigrant problems there are at the moment and the sea would be keep at bay as well.


"This precious stone set in a silver sea,
which serves it in the office of a wall,
or as a moat defensive to a house,
against the envy of less happier lands,
this blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England".


Bill the Quill circa 1590

500N
31st Jan 2014, 23:27
Lon

Even maintaining the status quo requires managing the rivers.


Agree re building.

Removal of trees has a lot to do with drainage. I think trees make soil 6 times more absorbent.

Hydromet
1st Feb 2014, 01:09
Many trees are great water pumps, which extract water from the soil and transpire it to the atmosphere or use it in new cells. Also, they attenuate the rainfall over time, as well as preventing some from reaching the ground.

500N
1st Feb 2014, 01:43
I meant to say trees make the soil around them absorb at least 6 times more water.


We are also having flooding !

EMERGENCY services have warned Adelaide River residents to brace for floods with the river at 12.3m after heavy rain.

The river is 40 ft above normal level !

Hydromet
1st Feb 2014, 06:26
I meant to say trees make the soil around them absorb at least 6 times more water.
Sounds like a reasonable number. Just did a quick check, and about 600mm/year is one figure quoted for a stand of Eucalypts. That's quite a bit, but sorry, it's not going to have much effect on your 40' flood!

Whiskey Kilo Wanderer
1st Feb 2014, 09:56
In the dim and distant past (around 1991) I worked as a humble hydrographic surveyor on the dredging and sill installation on this project (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maeslantkering). I hope it worked and that they donít come after me for their money backÖ.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Schaalmodel_Maeslantkering.jpg

Lon More
1st Feb 2014, 11:34
WKW it works pretty well.
'
The Dutch have a pretty good understanding of
river management (http://www.eh-resources.org/floods.html).
FWIW the Maas is about 100 meters from here, Hasn't overflown in about 20 years since the plans mentioned in that link were implemented.

axefurabz
1st Feb 2014, 19:42
Hasn't overflown in about 20 years since the plans mentioned in that link were implemented

I'm astonished that it even managed to get off the ground! :eek:

ruddman
1st Feb 2014, 19:49
Turn your pointy end to the sea ring down for half ahead, wedge yerself in your bunk wi a bottle of Gordons Gin and you've cracked it.

I just did that in a bar and got kicked out. :eek:


I much prefer my feet on dry land. Huge seas, rolling ships, icebergs. No thanks.

ShyTorque
1st Feb 2014, 20:10
Now I know why we had a rough ride flying home in the helicopter last night...

Blues&twos
1st Feb 2014, 20:46
That takes me back. Was brought up in Shoreham, Sussex, not far from the RNLI lifeboat station at the harbour entrance. I remember well hearing the maroons. They were properly loud, a really deep thump which you could feel as well as hear. Despite my dad driving quite fast, we never did get to see the boat launch...the closest we ever got was seeing it motoring out between the harbour arms and away out to sea.

G-CPTN
2nd Feb 2014, 13:03
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/72704000/jpg/_72704644_72704104.jpg

BBC News - French fishing crew rescued off north Cornwall coast (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-26006099)

beaufort1
2nd Feb 2014, 13:54
Cherbourg boat by the looks.

Krystal n chips
2nd Feb 2014, 16:12
Tues / Wed look like being good days not to be anywhere near the sea....and will be bad enough on dry land for that matter.

tony draper
2nd Feb 2014, 16:23
Main thing going for Ships is they are meant to get wet.:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
2nd Feb 2014, 18:47
BBC News - French fishing boat crew rescued off Cornish coast (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-26009661)

Realise that the lifeboat was alongside the fishing boat but unable to snatch the crew until they jumped into the sea. Four were lifted by the Culdrose helicopter and the fifth by the lifeboat.

Lon More
2nd Feb 2014, 18:52
Falmouth Coastguard said the public should not attempt to view the wreckage from the cliffs, describing weather conditions as "pretty appalling".

which will only encourage some of the idiots.
Lifeboat/SAR crews again in danger to rescue them.

SARF
2nd Feb 2014, 20:12
Unfortunately trees don't suck up much water in the uk In winter

SARF
2nd Feb 2014, 20:13
The rnli love a 'shout'.. It's the 'idiots' that keep them sharp for the real deal

pigboat
2nd Feb 2014, 21:11
http://www.vesselfinder.com/vessels/userphoto/978

https://scontent-b-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn2/t1/1618680_584413634982997_1011612440_n.jpg

There used to be a shot of the MV Thalassa Desgagnes (MV Rio Orinoco) showing her how she looked when she made port here after a winter storm in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, but I can no longer find it. These two of the Herm J will suffice.

tony draper
2nd Feb 2014, 21:28
They need to send someone down the engine room to tell the Chief to turn the steam on the handrails on.
:uhoh:

pigboat
3rd Feb 2014, 03:11
Something for sure Tony. I can't understand why she didn't turn turtle with that load topside.

500N
3rd Feb 2014, 03:15
Because she is sitting very low in the water, most of her weight is level with
or below the water level.

G-CPTN
12th Feb 2014, 21:46
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/72938000/jpg/_72938186_dorset.jpg

Hurricane Force 12 forecast - the wind is roaring here.

BBC News - UK storms: Gale force winds bring chaos to North West (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-26152212)

Lonewolf_50
12th Feb 2014, 21:58
Huge seas, rolling ships, icebergs. No thanks. It's one of the grandest adventures known to man: going to sea in ships.

Sorry it isn't your cup of tea. I'm glad for all the time I spent at sea, but admit that nowadays I am fading into a bit of a landlubber.

G-CPTN:
While that view looks to be foreshortened ...

WOW!

G-CPTN
12th Feb 2014, 23:09
While that view looks to be foreshortened ... "I'm the landlady of the Cove House Inn in Chiswell and we were hit by a session of massive waves last Wednesday. It was very, very scary - very rough. The waves must have been about 100ft high and came crashing through at about 10:30 in the morning. I got caught in an earlier wave and was washed down the slope to the road, there was no way anyone in their right mind would go out in that weather.
Downstairs wasn't too bad as we had shutters on the windows. But the waves penetrated the second and third floor windows and flooded the bedrooms, with water pouring through the ceilings into the pub. It was over in a couple of hours but it poured and poured with rain for two days solid. We had to shut the pub for a few days but it is open again now. It's still blustering out there though - we've boarded up every window, it's like living in a prison because you can't see out.
We are waiting for insurers but I reckon we are looking at about £10,000 to £15,000 worth of damage. David Cameron came to the pub yesterday and said there would be unlimited funding.
The pub is right on the seafront but I've never seen anything like it in the three years I've been a landlady here. I think there was horrendous weather in 1979 and then the pub was shut for about three months."
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/66239000/gif/_66239292_line2.gifFrom:- BBC News - UK storms: Eyewitness accounts from the worst-affected areas (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-26150788)