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probes
20th Jan 2014, 08:18
once again, sth I stumbled upon while looking for something else:

How to Open a Can without Can Opener - Zombie Survival Tips #20 - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oH2NahLjx-Y#t=129)

and another one that has helped me get several beers when saving someone of thirst (men, at that :\ - the non-imaginative ones, I guess)

How to Open a Beer with Another Beer - YouTube

Ancient Mariner
20th Jan 2014, 08:33
Oldest trick in the book. You can also open the second beer botle with the opened one, just slap the cork back on. Or use a lighter, a comb, belt buckle, shoe.....anything. A beer bottle with its cork on is a wasted bottle of beer.
Per

probes
20th Jan 2014, 08:38
yep. That's what I thought, too, until it made some exited as if it were rocket science. Funny when explained step-by-step, too (sort of like the instruction for boiling water). :cool:

sitigeltfel
20th Jan 2014, 09:46
You can try this with wine.......

8EZZVIyVeQI

..but it would be pretty undrinkable after that punishment.

This is a good party trick, but it leaves a dangerous edge on the bottle neck..

vNnf-5koWrg

500N
20th Jan 2014, 09:50
"Or use a lighter, a comb, belt buckle, shoe.....anything."

They solved the problem here in Aus, the Sea Belt Buckle of Holden Cars
was designed so the square hole in the middle was the perfect size to open
bottles of beer. A bogan's delight !

Well, designed might be stretching it a bit far but by coincidence it was the right size.

And then they brought in drink driving laws !

onetrack
20th Jan 2014, 10:05
Good God, the world is in a worse state than I realised, if people need videos on how to flip a top off a bottle of beer, without an opener!! :rolleyes:

You can do the same with the back of any metal knife - and if you don't have a tool, you merely sit the cap on a sharp edge and give the top a sharp blow downwards with the heel of your palm.

Re survival tips - I've seen some resourceful people get themselves out of some horrible jams, and they didn't need instructional videos, they just used common sense, and used what was at hand.

One exercise was a geologist mate who went on an exploration jaunt by himself in the late 1960's, to some really remote country in the interior of Australia.

He had a V8 Ford F100 ute (pickup), camping gear, adequate tools, plenty of food and water, and geological exploration gear - but no two-way radio or any form of communication. He told compatriots he'd be back in about 2 or 3 weeks.

He set up camp on some flat, clear ground - and went out exploring geologically, all day and every day, for a few days.
Unbeknowns to him, he left the ute radio on, but with the volume turned right down - so it flattened the F100 battery.

When the time came to move camp, he found he was f**ked and far from home. There was no way he could get the F100 to fire up. No spark in the battery, not even enough to light up the idiot lights.
The F100 didn't have crankhandle start, and he was on dead level ground - and there was no-one within 100 miles - and it would be another fortnight before anyone came looking for him.

Yet, he got out of his fix within a couple of days, and got the V8 started. How do you think he achieved it? :confused:

500N
20th Jan 2014, 10:08
"You can do the same with the back of any metal knife - and if you don't have a tool, you merely sit the cap on a sharp edge and give the top a sharp blow downwards with the heel of your palm."


That was exactly what I was thinking when the table came into view in the video.
Talk about making things more complicated than they need to be.

500N
20th Jan 2014, 10:11
"Yet, he got out of his fix within a couple of days, and got the V8 started. How do you think he achieved it? http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/confused.gif"


Jack the car up, use rope or belts to turn the wheels while the car
is in gear and ignition on.

That's one way, I am sure other ways exist.

jolihokistix
20th Jan 2014, 10:13
Brilliant thread! :ok:

onetrack
20th Jan 2014, 10:43
500N - But how do you turn over a 5 litre high compression V8 fast enough to get it to fire, using your method? - and how do you get any spark from a totally dead battery? - enough to fire 8 spark plugs? :E

500N
20th Jan 2014, 10:48
Don't know. I know it works on cars.

I am waiting for him to post how it was done.

Worrals in the wilds
20th Jan 2014, 10:55
Yet, he got out of his fix within a couple of days, and got the V8 started. How do you think he achieved it? http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/confused.gifAs per the Jack Absolom approach... He took out a deck of cards and started playing Patience (Solitaire). Within half an hour someone leaned over his shoulder and said 'ya know you can put that Red Jack on the Queen of Spades'...:E:} Then he got that person to jump start his vehicle.

Seriously, IIRC the Absolom method was as per 500N's post and I've never wanted to be in a postion to rely on it. I'm a young 'un and carry a spare battery, a satphone and a PLB when going for a nice drive in the desert :} (not to mention a spare week's worth of basic food and water), so fortunately the situation hasn't cropped up.

Respectfully admitting defeat, what was the solution?

500N
20th Jan 2014, 11:00
Worrals

I have now added a Small Solar panel that will charge a battery over time.
At least enough to get a spark.

onetrack
20th Jan 2014, 11:07
500N - Ahh, but this was in the days of yore, when solar panels were but a dream! Do you want to try again? :)

500N
20th Jan 2014, 11:14
OneTrack

No, I'm not mechanically minded so unlikely to get it.

I'd light a dirty great bush fire, always gets people coming to check it out
then use my signal panel and mirror !


So what's the answer ?

cattletruck
20th Jan 2014, 11:17
I'd say he disconnected the alternator belt and turned the alternator by hand (or some other improvised contraption such as a rope).

Worrals in the wilds
20th Jan 2014, 11:20
I have now added a Small Solar panel that will charge a battery over time.Interesting, I must look into those.

My last couple of trips have been relatively cosmopolitan; mining vehicles and grey nomads were the biggest hazards :bored:, and every 400kms there was a town with a brand new Coffee Shop offering Lattes and gourmet foccacias (they didn't always know how to work the brand new coffee machine. I had to help more than once). IMO the Outback's getting too bloody crowded. :uhoh::}

My main defence in designated remote areas has always been to file a regular report back home. Carrying ten day's worth of basic water/food allows for a week's rescue time.

Fortunately on every trip I've returned with a big surplus of tinned salmon, stew, fruit and biscuits. :cool:

So...what was the answer?

onetrack
20th Jan 2014, 12:14
Well, I guess you'd all make it, one way or another, because you're basically on the right track. I dunno how you'd go on the espresso withdrawal symptoms, after a few days, though. :)

This is what he did. He took out all the spark plugs and jacked up a rear wheel. Using Jacks technique, he engaged top gear and wrapped a rope around the rear tyre and pulled regularly for a couple of hours.
Luckily, the Ford V8 was fitted with one of them new-fangled alternators, which commence charging at relatively low RPM. After a couple of hours of wheel-pulling, he had enough charge in the battery to provide a spark at the plugs.

After a rest and some energy replenishment (food), he re-installed all the spark plugs, but only by a couple of threads.
He had previously found he couldn't get enough cranking speed with tyre spinning, to enable the engine to start, with all 8 plugs properly installed.
The loose plugs allowed enough compression to escape that enabled easier turning and a higher rotational speed for starting - but they would still fire the fuel-air mix O.K., once a satisfactory cranking speed was reached.
He heated the plugs on the campfire before installation (hot plugs fire a fuel-air mix better).
He pumped the accelerator to inject some fuel via the accelerator pump, and tied the accelerator linkage into a position that equated to about a fast idle speed.
Wrapping the rope around the rear tyre again, he again commenced to pull. It took about 5 mins for the engine to fire.

Once it was running, he loosened the accelerator tie strap and reduced the engine speed to an idle - well, a rough idle, anyway!
With some difficulty, he managed to tighten all the remaining spark plugs, until they were all fully seated (he said he wasn't game to let it stop, once it was running!).
Once all the plugs were fully installed, he was set! He reckoned he spent considerable time and fuel in running the engine at moderate RPM, to ensure the battery was adequately charged, before he was game enough to turn it off again!

Worrals - it's always wise to carry 10 days supplies and plenty of water when travelling in remote areas. Fortunately, modern communications are brilliant as compared to what we had to endure in a bygone era - but the threat if becoming stranded is still ever-present, as thunderstorms can close roads within hours and leave you stuck for days.
Dual batteries and solar panels have made life so much easier today, and roads have improved enormously.

However - and there's always a downside - modern vehicles have become so high-tech, that an electronic fault can strand you more effectively than any breakdown of a previous, more simple era could.
In the old days, baling twine and "twitched wire" repairs could get you home.

Not so today - an ECU failure, and your only solution is a tilt-tray ride back to the dealer and his $150,000 diagnostic computer.
I've heard some horror stories of modern electronic 4WD's breaking down in remote areas such as the Canning Stock Route, whereby the tilt-tray recovery bill was up to $10,000.

rgbrock1
20th Jan 2014, 12:26
It is quite easy to open a bottle of beer with a cigarette lighter. :ok:

probes
20th Jan 2014, 13:47
pfui, rgb, not an option, as you're the very single one in the world forgiven to be having a lighter, to start with. Provided it's used as intended.

500N
20th Jan 2014, 13:54
One Track

Very interesting.

Agree re high tech vehicles. If I was out bush, I would still like a 4WD
that had handles to wind down the windows !

"In the old days, baling twine and "twitched wire" repairs could get you home."

I've driven an old farmers vehicle that used twine and wire to hold the engine together and run the fan. He was one of those farmers where everything mechanical needed something fixed on it.

John Hill
20th Jan 2014, 17:52
I recall a fishing boat that was on a mooring overnight while the crew slept off an evening of beer drinking but someone had left the deck washing hose over the side which had been slowly siphoning back. By morning the water was up to their bunks and the engine room and batteries well flooded. They were in Fiordland and maybe no one around for miles and their radio useless.

Fortunately it was a good old reliable Perkins diesel and being a boat they had ropes and pulleys etc to hand. They hauled an empty fuel drum up the mast and ran a rope from there through pulleys down to the engine room and wrapped around the flywheel. They carried buckets of water up the mast and filled the fuel drum but the engine would barely turn. They took the rocker cover off the engine and shoved kitchen knives in the valve gear to relieve compression and the engine started.

BTW, if it was me with a flat battery in the Australian desert I would have taken the battery out and sat it in the heat of the sun for a few hours to push the chemical reaction just a little bit further and get enough ergs for the ignition.

con-pilot
20th Jan 2014, 19:04
John

BTW, if it was me with a flat battery in the Australian desert I would have taken the battery out and sat it in the heat of the sun for a few hours to push the chemical reaction just a little bit further and get enough ergs for the ignition.

That will work in cases of extreme cold as well. Once many years ago I was in Gunison, Colorado and the temperature that night set an all time low, -35f/-37c. I was staying at a hotel and my hire car was sitting in the parking lot (outside) in front of my room.

The car's battery was dead, even the lights on the dash panel would not come on. I knew the battery was fully charged the evening before. So I pushed the car out in to where the sun would shine on the engine compartment and battery, then let it sit there for a couple of hours.

After that it started up, no problem.

My aircraft at the airport was another story. :(

Worrals in the wilds
20th Jan 2014, 19:41
He must have been seriously hot and sweaty after that effort. As you say, comms have improved enormously and we're very lucky to have them.

I've heard some horror stories of modern electronic 4WD's breaking down in remote areas such as the Canning Stock Route, whereby the tilt-tray recovery bill was up to $10,000.
Same. Last time I was up north I heard of a few that had been abandoned up on the Cape because they had computer meltdowns and their owners couldn't afford the retrieval costs :ouch:. Most modern 4WDs are stuffed with more gadgets than a space shuttle to keep the city drivers happy, but by the sounds of it they don't always hold up in rough conditions. There are some horror stories around about car computers literally shaking to bits, leaving the car stone dead. A warranty is one thing, but first you have to get the damned car to the dealership.

Unfortunately the car manufacturers know that most 4WDs are bought by people who rarely (if ever) take them off road, so it's not in their interests to spend money building a car that can actually do what the ads claim it can. :ugh:

500N
20th Jan 2014, 19:55
As Worrals said, plenty of 4WD's get dumped / left. Especially by Abos
after an accident or a small accident.

Or a water crossing !!! Toyota (and others) have deemed that placing
certain critical components low down in the engine bay a good move :rolleyes:
and then they supply the Land cruiser with a snorkel !!!


"but by the sounds of it they don't always hold up in rough conditions."

Abos have started buying Great Wall 4WD's, we are now waiting to see
how they cope after two wet seasons and 2 years of corrugated roads.
We are not holding out much hope of the vehicles lasting 5 years.

SASless
20th Jan 2014, 20:48
Any decent Helicopter Pilot knows a minimum of 57 ways to open a Beer Bottle..

ShyTorque
20th Jan 2014, 21:52
I have two essential items for opening beer bottles. A blonde and a bottle opener. Seems to work well enough. Voice activated but sometimes bringa a mug of tea by mistake. No complaints unless it's too slow.

The cans in these parts have a tab to open them.

Ancient Mariner
20th Jan 2014, 22:20
In those days when I was a heavy smoker, which was, ummmm 118 days, 7 hours and 34 minutes ago, I was in a position where I had no matches, lighter, visible sun or any other means by which to light my cigarette.
I did however have acces to electricity, a Texas rechargeable calculator and a ball point pen. I short circuited the battery with the spring from the pen and when it glowed I lighted the cigarette.
I charged the battery and repeated the process untill I was dismissed after 21 days due to good behaviour.
Per

rh200
20th Jan 2014, 23:15
Not so today - an ECU failure, and your only solution is a tilt-tray ride back to the dealer and his $150,000 diagnostic computer.
I've heard some horror stories of modern electronic 4WD's breaking down in remote areas such as the Canning Stock Route, whereby the tilt-tray recovery bill was up to $10,000.

Yep the days when you could have the diesel that required power to shut down are over.:{

If I ever go slightly around the twist (well more than I am now) and start getting ready for armagedon I'll be looking to find one.:p

500N
20th Jan 2014, 23:21
I have now really seen the benefit of diesel over petrol up north.

onetrack
21st Jan 2014, 00:40
AM - When you need to start a fire to cook or keep warm, on a wet, drizzly cold day - and everyone forgot the matches, and there's no flint, no flinty rocks, and nothing that would even look like initiating a fire - what do you do??

Well, a favourite bush stunt is to soak a rag with petrol, pull off a spark plug lead and place it where it can arc to some metal on the vehicle body, place the soaked rag adjacent to the spark plug lead - crank the engine over, and voila! - we have fire!
One has to be exceptionally careful one doesn't burn the vehicle to the ground in the process, of course! :)

I seem to recall one clever young pilot who crash-landed successfully in a very remote outback area, and who thought the best way of alerting rescuers was via a fire in the spinifex bushes adjacent to the aircraft.
Spinifex burns very well, with lots of black smoke, due to a high resin content in the plant.

Unfortunately, his planning procedures didn't take into account, strong winds that can suddenly change direction - and he suddenly found himself fighting an aircraft fire!! Embarrassingly, he lost that fight as well! It just wasn't his day, obviously! :)

421dog
21st Jan 2014, 12:47
My 67 series II opens beer bottles, cooks on the radiator grill and starts with a crank with a flat battery if need be as it has a permanent magnet generator.

Airey Belvoir
21st Jan 2014, 14:26
Prior planning can get you out of lots of tricky situations. That's why the RAF had navigators (they doubled as a spare food supply as well as guiding you to the crash site).

onetrack
21st Jan 2014, 21:40
Many an Outback traveller has learnt all about "load security" for food, drinks, and fuel, the hard way.

One classic example is the number of 4WD'ers who carry cartons of canned beer or other pre-packaged drinks in aluminium cans.
Now, aluminium cans are very soft and very thin - and unless you place some serious padding under them and tie them down securely - the bouncing over rough tracks with no underside protection, will nearly always ensure that the movement causes abrasion on the cans undersides, that results in pinholes in every can - and all empty cans!

You've never seen real tears from grown men, unless you've seen them reach their favourite remote campsite/fishing spot - only to find that every can of beer in every carton, now has an abraded bottom, and they're all empty!! :ooh: :} :yuk:

Another event that springs to mind was a brother and his boss who went travelling in a remote area with a good supply of canned food (in proper tin cans), stored in an exposed wooden box in the back of the ute (pickup).

Unfortunately, it rained heavily at one stage of their trip - and the result was, all the paper labels washed off the cans!
Of course, they had a wide range of canned food, from canned jams, to canned fruit, to canned meat - but it then became a real "lucky dip" when opening an un-marked can, as to what they got!
Brother said it was a total disappointment to be looking forward to a can of meat for dinner - only to find he'd opened a can of marmalade instead!! :)

500N
22nd Jan 2014, 00:17
An example of how it can all turn to crap very easily but in this case
a good outcome. And they weren't that far from help which helped.

Dad swims to find help | NT News (http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/northern-territory/dad-swims-to-find-help/story-fnk0b1zt-1226807170722)

OllyBeak
22nd Jan 2014, 01:00
Here we are - nearly two pages of how to open a beer bottle and nobody's mentioned Bangkok!

SawMan
22nd Jan 2014, 01:24
The most important survival tool is your brain. If you've honed the use of it you'll find a way out when the others don't. Having all you need does you no good if you don't know how to make the best use of it, so hone your thinking and the rest will take care of itself. My old truck has only electronic ignition for newer technology- and an entire set spare ignition system stored away just in case. If you leave civilization in one of these newer super-computer-cars, your sanity needs to be checked if you are relying on it getting you back. Too much can fail and it does since it can. Technology is unbeatable when it's working, but until it's as self-repairable and as reliable as the old stuff I'll keep what I've got, thank you.

I'll be sure wave and smile in passing when you're electro-gizmo dies on you in the middle of nowhere. I'm a nice guy, aren't I? :ok:

james ozzie
22nd Jan 2014, 07:08
Someone above mentioned the "snorkel" on Toyotas - I suspect this is a feature designed to reduce road dust pick up to extend filter life. Anyone who thinks this allows the vehicle to cross flooded causeways is making a big error, methinks.

charliegolf
22nd Jan 2014, 07:15
Prior planning can get you out of lots of tricky situations. That's why the RAF had navigators (they doubled as a spare food supply as well as guiding you to the crash site).

Not to mention a handy IR decoy when you unilaterally bang 'em out!

CG

dubbleyew eight
22nd Jan 2014, 07:20
ollybeak I've never seen a beer bottle in bangkok.

in the black swan beside asok station the little cute as hell girlie in the black chongsam brings your beer in a chilled half litre glass. very civilised.

they seem to lead the way because every other bar in bangkok does the same ...but with less impressive chongsams.

(mmmmm I could go one of those heinekens right now)

500N
22nd Jan 2014, 07:38
James Ozzie

Re
"Someone above mentioned the "snorkel" on Toyotas - I suspect this is a feature designed to reduce road dust pick up to extend filter life. Anyone who thinks this allows the vehicle to cross flooded causeways is making a big error, methinks."


A by product of the snorkel is cleanER air into the engine which in Aus
with bull dust can be a problem BUT dust does not stuff an engine
like water ingress will and a snorkel will allow you to drive through deep water without any worry about water getting into the engine which will go bang
as soon as it happens.

How else would you drive over a flooded river with water over the bonnet
if you didn't have a snorkel ?

Airey Belvoir
22nd Jan 2014, 08:05
A few years ago I inadvertently took my Defender across a flooded creek and brown water came half way up the windscreen for a brief moment in the middle.


I was very thankful of my snorkel then!

Metro man
22nd Jan 2014, 09:18
I would be very careful when driving through flooded water because if the cooling fan is turning, once it meets water it behaves like a boat propellor and pulls itself free.

500N
22nd Jan 2014, 09:25
Metro

Different ways and means exist to stop that occurring, the primary one being to keep the bow wave ahead of the car. If the water is that deep you can cover the
front with a tarp which really does keep a bow wave in front and so the water stays out of the engine bay.

Crossing swollen rivers and causeways is a necessity in some places in Aus
otherwise you wouldn't move for 6 months of the year.

onetrack
22nd Jan 2014, 13:43
This bloke takes "deep-water operation", to a whole new level ... errrr ... depth!

He just about needs a snorkel for himself at one stage! His vid has given me a whole new level of respect for old SJ Suzies! :)


Farley quarry 20/5/07 suzuki sj water - YouTube

The SSK
22nd Jan 2014, 14:34
My favourite survival tip, from my old mate Montana Mike, is one I might never need.
If you want to escape from a bear charging at you, always run downhill.

MagnusP
22nd Jan 2014, 14:37
My main survival tip has been never, EVER say "Yes, yer bum looks big in that".

The SSK
22nd Jan 2014, 14:45
Magnus I have been known to get away with giving the answer before the question has even been asked
'Yes it does'
'Yes it does what?'
'Oh, nothing'.
Risky, but satisfying

MagnusP
22nd Jan 2014, 14:47
Dicing with death, or at least pain, there SSK. Braver than I.

probes
23rd Jan 2014, 07:55
If you want to escape from a bear charging at you, always run downhill.
why?.....................

Loose rivets
23rd Jan 2014, 08:03
If you want to escape from a bear charging at you, always run downhill - having tied his shoe laces together.

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 08:06
You only have to run faster than the other bloke !:O

Don't run.

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 08:11
If in bear country carry repellant or a gun.

probes
23rd Jan 2014, 08:28
Bear repellant? Which would be...? :confused:

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 08:41
A spray can of I think a type of pepper but will have to check.
A lot of people carry a pistol (non hunters).

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Jan 2014, 08:56
A spray can of I think a type of pepper but will have to check.

What do bears taste like with pepper sauce?

dubbleyew eight
23rd Jan 2014, 08:57
you can detect the presence of environmentalists by checking the bear droppings.

droppings with the smell of pepper mean greenies have been around.

The SSK
23rd Jan 2014, 08:58
A quick Google reveals that bears can indeed run downhill and bloody fast. I must tell Montana Mike that his tip is fallacious. There are more bears where he is than where I am.

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 09:07
I have been told by friends that bear tastes good.

Pepper anything tastes good.


Bears can run up hill fast as we'll.

Just don't run.

I'm being serious.

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Jan 2014, 09:30
So the pepper is in fact a condiment....:E

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 09:35
Depends on who eats who

dubbleyew eight
23rd Jan 2014, 09:46
survival tip.

snake skins are waterproof.

guy in a 4wd out bush bursts a radiator hose and loses coolant. stuffed and without a paddle.
local aboriginal guy comes over to enquire if the guy needed some help.
looks at burst radiator hose and says 'wait here bloke, I can fix that.'
vanishes off and returns a while later with a dead black snake.
cuts skin just below head and proceeds to peel back the snake skin.
trims resulting tube to length and fixes in place with the original radiator clamps. filled with water from a local dam the 4wd is back in business.
nothing goes wrong and guy completes trek and forgets all about the snake skin.
months later puts 4wd in for a service.
mechanic rings him and asks what the odd bit of radiator hose is and does he want it replaced.

true story.

moosp
23rd Jan 2014, 11:35
Good story from an ex Swedish Navy submarine engineer who ended up on the bottom in shallow water with zero battery power and no standby power to start the many cylinder inline diesel.

He wound a rope around the open flywheel, took it 90 degrees through a block and led it down a companionway into the hands of many matelots. He then wedged each exhaust valve open with a wooden peg, and made sure he had a good clearway to run at them.

Aforementioned matelots started running with the rope and he ran knocking the pegs out one by one. Worked on the fourth run.

He didn't have to buy aquavit for a couple of months after that one.

onetrack
23rd Jan 2014, 13:45
Dubbleyew - Good one! I must remember to keep a dead snake on hand for those burst hose moments. :) Was that blackfella one of the TV "Bush Mechanics" series blackfellas? :)

I can recall a few extraordinary fixes.

Chewing gum for fuel tank perforations.
Egg white in the cooling system for small holes in the radiator.
Heavy leather makes a good temporary big-end bearing.
Lost a wheel and no spares left? Use a log jammed in the bodywork or over the front section of a leaf spring, and under the axle, wired into place. Drive on, slowly!
Motor kaput and you need to move a heavy vehicle a short distance? (as in, up out of a flooded creek). Select 1st gear and crank the starter over, 30 seconds at a time, allowing a couple of minutes in between for cooling.
Lost a fanbelt, no spare? Your girlfriends/wifes pantyhose is good enough for a temporary belt.

There must be a lot more, that I've forgotten.

Modern electronic vehicles make all these bush repairs a lot more difficult.
I've got no bush repair for a U/S ECU or sensor/s. :(

rgbrock1
23rd Jan 2014, 13:54
onetrack wrote:

Lost a fanbelt, no spare? Your girlfriend/wife is good enough for a temporary belt.

There, I fixed it for you. Wouldn't want to waste perfectly good panty hose would we? :}

The SSK
23rd Jan 2014, 14:16
I had a friend whose old banger (Morris Minor or suchlike) ran dry on the South Circular Road in an extremely heavy fog. He was standing there with the bonnet up when another car came crawling along out of the mist, pulled up and two blokes got out.
‘Anything we can do to help?’
‘Yes, would you mind peeing in my radiator?’
They obliged, and it was enough to get him home.

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 17:28
"Chewing gum for fuel tank perforations."

I think it was our second long driving holiday in Aus, about 1980,
family drove a Volvo station wagon Melbourne to Darwin and
return, the return bit via the Birdsville track.

Going over one of the cattle grids slowly near the start we still managed
to put a small hole in the fuel tank.

Out came the chewing gum and that stayed in all the way to Melbourne.

Haraka
23rd Jan 2014, 18:20
"Chewing gum for fuel tank perforations."
Used soap in Namibia to get a Pajero ( Not mine!) back to S.A.
Then there is the old one with a big tubeless tyre repair.
After repairing the tyre put it around the rim and add petrol . Give it a few seconds then throw a match in.
"Whoomph!" and the tyre is sealed back in the rim.
Honestly - it works.

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 19:33
"Endless praise from ladyfriend."

That is a novel way to get a women into bed ;)

Flight_Idle
23rd Jan 2014, 20:00
The ball point pen really works when getting into a suitcase, tried it on one of my own.


Maybe this link will work, maybe not, haven't tried it on this forum before...Breaking into a Suitcase with a Ballpoint Pen and What You Can Do About It - YouTube

Hydromet
23rd Jan 2014, 20:41
I've used the starter motor trick to get a vehicle with vapour lock (bloody petrol vehicles) into the shade, and the chewing gum to patch a punctured fuel tank.

Then there was the late Tom Kruise, who built a new clutch plate for his truck from the bottom of a 44 gallon drum.

Fareastdriver
23rd Jan 2014, 20:59
I ran a big-end on a 51 Chevrolet. They had a 6 cyl engine with splash lube; scoops on the big-end caps that collected oil off troughs in the sump. A bloke I knew who had a nearby ranch came along. We towed it to his spread and we fixed the big-end by wrapping a strip of Kudu hide round it.

Lasted for a week until I took it in to have the bearings remetalled.

onetrack
23rd Jan 2014, 21:30
Ahh, the original cynic! Sorry, no myths here, I personally knew the bloke with stuck F100, and I got the story from him directly, and he wasn't inclined to produce regular BS.
I've also personally used pantyhose for a fanbelt - it's certainly not durable, it's far from ideal as a replacement, and you need to keep the RPM down. However, it will get you out of trouble.

Re the peeing in the radiator, you can use a lot of liquids for emergency coolant. I've known of a couple of blokes who were forced to use beer for coolant! :( That was obviously a bigger tragedy than the burst radiator hose! :(

That decision was only undertaken with a great deal of regret ... :( ... and because there were definitely no other options.
They only had a relatively small amount of water, and had to top up with beer, because they had a couple of cartons on board.
The weather wasn't hot, so the loss of the drinking water wasn't critical .... but the beer, however ...... :( :yuk:

G-CPTN
23rd Jan 2014, 21:44
Using the starter motor (or the starting handle - remember those?) in first or reverse gear can extract a stuck vehicle from a snowdrift or mud or even a ditch (it depends how badly it is stuck of course). Using the engine exceeds the torque needed to spin the wheels, but the effect of the slower speed seems to work and crawl the vehicle out.

Another trick to extract a stuck vehicle is to wrap a rope around the wheel that is spinning (with the wheel stationary of course) and attach the rope to a solid object like a tree (you might need a long rope and a suitably located tree). Obviously you need to chose forward or reverse gear as appropriate.

Or you could wrap the rope through the driving wheels around the tyre forming 'snowchains'. Even small diameter rope will work. Can be useful to get your vehicle back onto a non-slippery surface. I carry handfuls of long sturdy cable-ties that can be quickly slotted through the wheels to act as 'chains'. If your cable ties are too short - join them together (assuming that you have enough).

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 21:48
"(you might need a long rope and a suitably located tree)"

If no tree is available use the spare tyre and dig it into the ground
at at angle (ie bury it) and this will more often than not give you
something to pull off.

John Hill
23rd Jan 2014, 22:31
The F100 guy was just an amateur really...
Man, stranded in the desert, makes a motorcycle from his broken car (http://hackaday.com/2012/05/21/man-stranded-in-the-desert-makes-a-motorcycle-from-his-broken-car/)

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 22:41
We got a 4WD type Oversized Golf Buggy type vehicles built by Honda
stuck in the middle of a flood plain courtesy of the driver "cutting the corner"
instead of following the fence.

When I say bogged, all 4 wheels with a bit of weight on it and too far
from anything substantial for the winch cable.

First we had to winch off a tyre and picket we dug into the mud.

Then, what he ended up dong was rope to the end of winch cable,
another rope to the fence and then we atached another piece of rope to two strands of the fence at two points to spread the load.

And he winched out the vehicle slowly using the fence.

I was impressed.

rh200
23rd Jan 2014, 22:54
This and the panty hose bollox are just re-told myths,Doesn't take that much effort to spin a donk over with no compression, especially if she's a bit worn. Rear wheel in the air, one to one ratio, once you get over the initial inertia, should be entirely feasible.

What was hard was trying to crank start the early Toyota Land cruiser six cylinders :(.

500N
23rd Jan 2014, 22:57
"What was hard was trying to crank start the early Toyota Land cruiser six cylinders http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/sowee.gif."

L A N D R O V E R 'S as well.

I think ours was a series 2A.

John Hill
24th Jan 2014, 00:35
Rear wheel in the air, one to one ratio, once you get over the initial inertia, should be entirely feasible.

Please try this and report back..

Rear axle ratio of something close to 4:1 and with one wheel on the ground the differential action will add another 2:1 so that is 8:1..:rolleyes:

dubbleyew eight
24th Jan 2014, 00:48
a lot of these dodges work because the engine is worn.
with a totally new engine a lot of tricks would be impossible.
with an old engine with worn rings and compression down a little you get the opportunity to push the engine over compression, the spark fires, then the mixture in the cylinder does the rest (for a petrol engine).

cattletruck
24th Jan 2014, 07:16
pantyhose for a fanbelt

My fans are electrically operated, but don't tell her that :E

Solid Rust Twotter
24th Jan 2014, 07:23
Most of the bush vehicles we use have a spare fan belt already fitted and secured out of the way with cable ties. If the old one breaks, just snip the ties and slip it onto the pulleys.

alisoncc
24th Jan 2014, 08:12
An awfully long time ago when I was flying in PNG I always carried a small survival kit - water purification tablets, compass and a home-made heliograph. Didn't have satellite mobile phones in those days. Still got the heliograph.

It comprises a polished piece of metal (metal mirror) - 3.5" by 4" with two diagonal lines etched into the shiny side and where they cross in the centre a small hole drilled through it. The hole about 1/16th inch in diameter. A second piece of metal - aluminium stock, about an inch wide with a hole drilled in it of 1/8th inch diameter is also required.

In order to signal to an aircraft you need the sun in front of you, and you hold the etched mirror close to your eye with your left hand whilst looking through the hole in the middle, with the other bit of kit held a foot or so in front with your right hand. The object is to get the suns reflection of the etched cross lines to centre on the hole in the forward piece of metal.

Now whilst keeping the reflection of the crossed etched lines centered on the forward piece of metal, align yourself so you can see the the aircraft you want to signal to through the two holes. The mirror surface is now pointing straight at the aircraft and reflecting the sun also straight at it.

500N
24th Jan 2014, 08:19
Alison

I believe someone signaled a passing aircraft (jet) over Aus
one day using a signal mirror and was rescued.

I carry a mirror for that purpose.

Fareastdriver
24th Jan 2014, 08:26
When I flew in Borneo I always took a pack of cards with me. Should you force land or crash in the middle of nowhere just start playing patience.

In no time somebody will look over your shoulder and tell you that there is a Black Queen to go on a Red King.....

You're saved!!!!

alisoncc
24th Jan 2014, 08:30
500N, just waving a mirror around has an element of luck in that it might just catch the intended recipients eye. Whereas the heliograph I describe actually acts like the sight on a 303 pointing straight at the person in question. Far greater chance of success.

Solid Rust Twotter
24th Jan 2014, 08:32
CD makes a pretty good heliograph. Also makes a fair cutting tool if you break it in half.

500N
24th Jan 2014, 08:32
Alison

Agree.

I have used your device in the mil.

Solid Rust Twotter
24th Jan 2014, 08:37
Use your thumb on your free hand instead of the bit of stock with a hole in it. Put thumb over aircraft or vehicle you want to signal and try to get the shadow from the hole in the CD on your thumbnail.

Little cloud
24th Jan 2014, 09:29
Interesting video on the American manufactured version of the signal mirror, which doesn't require the 'aiming stick' held in front.

Emergency Rescue Equipment: The Signaling Mirror - YouTube

Nowadays the weakest link is probably getting the passing aircrew to put down the Sudoku/newspaper/Ipad and look out the window!

cattletruck
24th Jan 2014, 10:48
Similar to the SRT method the Bear Gryls method is to hold your free arm outstretched and use two fingers in a V shape keeping the plane/car inside the V whilst holding the mirror as close to your targeting eye as possible as you aim the sun's reflection at the V.

Worrals in the wilds
24th Jan 2014, 11:19
Most of the bush vehicles we use have a spare fan belt already fitted and secured out of the way with cable ties. If the old one breaks, just snip the ties and slip it onto the pulleys.

The other (cheaper) method is to keep the previous fan belt and hoses as a backup, on the basis that there's usually a bit of life left in them. Personally I think it's easier to keep a spare set that can usually be used at the required service anyway, if they haven't been needed for an emergency.

Has anyone successfully fixed a busted head gasket with jam? It was one of those 'get you out of trouble' tricks that was bandied around.

Solid Rust Twotter
24th Jan 2014, 11:59
Fitting a new fan belt in the bush can be a bit tricky at times. If it's already in position behind the fan and any other obstacles, it just needs to be slipped over the pulleys without having to remove any components. A mate used to own a Piper Pacer where he kept a spare belt tie wrapped to the engine lifting shackles to avoid having to remove the prop to replace it if it broke. Keeping some of the old stuff is always a good idea if it's still usable.

SawMan
24th Jan 2014, 12:03
Millions of ways to extract oneself from trouble, but with all of then you must have some kind of tools to work with and something to use them on. I once got stuck in the mud far from help. Dry solid ground was about a hundred feel away, but uphill. I spied a solid looking small tree nearby, hacked it down to make a suitable lever, and began to lever away. The car moved, but moved back when I let go for another bite with the lever. I found a short log that would chock a wheel and was long enough to reach the end of my car from the wheel. Levering and kicking the improvised chock into place got me mere inches of movement, but after four hours I was free and back on my way. I was glad that I had a hatchet handy, but even a pocketknife would have gotten my lever made- eventually. A ride with a friend stopped when his amateur brake pad swap had a bolt work loose causing the caliper to drop against the wheel. I had my lightweight "bug-out bag" along since we were going out of town, the vice-grips and adjustable wrench from there saving our day. BTW, I don't ride with him or get near his vehicles anymore.

I've wired through bolt-holes, zip-tied motorcycle fenders up, wedged things back into place, created wire insulation with various items, and once even installed a oil pump drive rod on the side of the road (luckily I hadn't cleaned my tool box out since I built that engine and the old one was tossed in there by chance). Now every vehicle has it's own comprehensive tool box and anytime I do work on it that requires another tool, that new tool goes with the vehicle afterward. And there's a hatchet in every one even if it doesn't leave the road. The main tools needed to survive- my brain and eyes- are always with me, and always taking in the details which might save my under-valued hide :ok:

I know a guy who carries so much junk with him that we make jokes about his "Bat-Belt". He thinks he is well equipped for anything, but I carry far less because I am smart enough to realize that you don't need to carry everything on you so long as you have everything you need at hand within reach nearby. Another carries his "bug-out bag" everywhere, containing 3 days worth of food and water and a tent- and he never leaves city where one can easily find those things all over if you but keep your eyes open for them. All my EDC stuff has to do is get me the things I might need and it will all fit in one pocket comfortably. If I need more, it will be there with me or within close reach. I've never been stuck to the point that someone else had to save me except medically and legally , and those times needed a skilled surgeon or lawyer, and both of those are beyond my capabilities anyway. I'v got the rest covered and that's the best I can do :cool:

dubbleyew eight
24th Jan 2014, 12:38
in the middle of no where and stuck.

clear a little area so it can't get out of hand.
light a little fire and keep it supplied with leaves and stuff so there is a plume of smoke.

there are a surprising number of people in the arid bush and one of them will absolutely check out why there is a little fire. ...and probably put it out.

if the guy who arrives is a naked spear carrying aboriginal dont be afraid.
he might just be a sydney lawyer going bush for a holiday.

ex_matelot
24th Jan 2014, 13:04
Are heliographs actually a credible method of inviting rescue nowadays? What's the chances of a Ryanair conducting an orbit over the Cairngorms after the thousand to one chance of actually paying attention to the ground in the arcs of view available? I'm only a ppl and I can honsestly say I don't think I would notice..but maybe that's because I've never been in that situation ??

500N
24th Jan 2014, 15:27
ex matelot

Possibly.

As you fly over the middle of Aus, you occasionally get a glint of light reflected
back at you from water (dams), windows etc.

The middle of Aus, sometimes referred to as the GAFA, Great Australian Fck All has very few people and few roads.

If you are continually getting a reflected flash from a mirror or a heliograph -
I would think that it would raise a pilots suspicion since the aircraft is barreling along at XXX kmh.
I wouldn't expect a commercial jet to do a circuit but a quick radio call isn't out of the question to pass on the rough location.

You'd notice a continual flash of light.

As someone mentioned, fire always attracts attention, especially an oily one or where part of a tyre has been added to create black smoke.

And then all you have to do is watch out for the dingos, drop bears
and razorbacks as they come in for what they think is a "free feed" ;)

Mechta
24th Jan 2014, 17:27
The main tools needed to survive- my brain and eyes- are always with me, and always taking in the details which might save my under-valued hide http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif

It was only on getting a 4x4 that I realised the reason for their popularity. They are so tall that you can see all the good stuff that's in skips as you drive by! :}

Worrals in the wilds
24th Jan 2014, 20:41
Fitting a new fan belt in the bush can be a bit tricky at times. If it's already in position behind the fan and any other obstacles, it just needs to be slipped over the pulleys without having to remove any components.Fair enough, thanks for the tip. Fortunately I've never had to deal with a busted fan belt.
Are heliographs actually a credible method of inviting rescue nowadays?Probably not if you're counting on a random rescue. However, if you've been missed because you wisely told someone back home where you were going and they haven't heard back from you in the pre-determined time, hopefully they will call the authorities (if they like you, be careful who you choose :E:}) and search aircraft/vehicles will be out looking for you in the correct general area. Then it could help, though I think the smoky fire method is probably more reliable.

Another Absalom tip is to always take note of any fences you passed. That way, if your car starts playing up and you can manage to get it back to the last fence you passed, chances are someone will come along to check the fence within a week or so, particularly if you start your smoky fire beside it.

Obviously abandoned fences don't count (and there are plenty of those) but his theory was that all maintained fences are owned by someone and serve a commercial purpose, so the owner will either check them himself or employ boundary riders to do so on a regular basis. Likewise water holes/bores, with the added advantage that you can drink from them. IMO none of this would help in the true deserts like the Tanami or the Simpson because they're Crown land and not really looked after by anyone; it's more useful for semi arid areas like the Diamantina where there are cattle stations and mining leases. That said, there are so many Simpson Desert expeditions these days that getting away from people is probably the hardest part. :\

I'm still very glad I've never had to put any of these theories to the test, and with modern communication equipment I'd hope to be able to raise the alarm, live off my tinned supplies, play cards and save a few (warm :() beers for the rescue party.

The biggest concern I've had travelling through remote areas is not breaking down; rather having a car accident out there and getting injured. Even if you're capable of getting out of the wreck and deploying your PLB or using your satphone, the useful rescue timeframe is greatly reduced if you're bleeding like a stuck pig.

I flew to Birdsville once and sat next to a local who was returning from Brisbane after medical treatment. She'd rolled her car between Bedourie and Birdsville and was stuck in it for four hours before someone else drove past and saw it. It was before satellite phones were readily available (and needless to say there's still no mobile coverage outside the main towns, it's satphone only), so several more hours passed before that person could get to Birdsville, round up the ambulance and a rescue crew and get back there to pull her out. Then it was another bumpy hour or so back to the town. She 'only' had a badly broken arm and busted ribs, but even so it must have been an awful trip. Have a sudden heart attack or serious bleeding out there and you're probably stuffed, even though with the same injuries you'd probably be all right in the city where an ambulance is only fifteen minutes away.

500N
24th Jan 2014, 20:48
"The biggest concern I've had travelling through remote areas is not breaking down; rather having a car accident out there and getting injured."

Agree. And I would include hitting an animal in that.

"between Bedourie and Birdsville and was stuck in it for four hours before someone else drove past and saw it."

Only 4 hours ?

In those days, it could be days. I don't think we passed one other car on the day we drove that track or maybe one road train.

I gather the Birdsville Track is a bit like Bourke Street now :O


I can imagine flying is so much easier !

Worrals in the wilds
24th Jan 2014, 21:04
Agree. And I would include hitting an animal in that.Another nightmare scenario, particularly at night :(. There's a special ninja species of black cow that wanders around western roads after dark. I missed three standing in the middle of the road by inches coming into Innamincka one night thanks to either instinct or Divine Providence. I'm inclined to go with the latter, because something made me slow down and it wasn't anything I actually saw.

I can imagine flying is so much easier ! And boringer, sweatier and more expensive :zzz:. I'd still rather drive if I have the time.

It was about fifteen years ago and she had her accident in summer, so the road was pretty deserted. During winter these days it's full of tourists (you pass a car at least every half hour, the outback's getting too bloody crowded :} and half of them don't know how to drive on an unsealed road :ugh:) but in summer it's still pretty quiet, more like what you saw on your trip.

Hydromet
24th Jan 2014, 21:07
if the guy who arrives is a naked spear carrying aboriginal dont be afraid.
he might just be a sydney lawyer going bush for a holiday.All the more reason to be very, very afraid.:E

500N
24th Jan 2014, 21:11
Somewhere between Adelaide and Darwin on our road trip holidays,
we were barreling along in the Volvo and passed between two horses
one on the edge of the road on one side and one on the other.
Both horses had the front feet on the tarmac.

How we missed them is anyone's guess but showed the dangers of night driving.

Not long after on a hunting trip to NSW we hit a cow in the Volvo, surprisingly the cow came off worse and after pulling the radiator forward, drove back to Melbourne. They built cars a lot tougher then than now.

Only last year I spent 2 days up NT way taking the broken fan / radiator out of a LandCruiser 80 series that had hit a Buffalo dead centre. Even with a Full steel bull bar it had stuffed the front of the vehicle and it wasn't going more than 60 when it hit.

I try to avoid driving at night on most county roads, it's just too
dangerous, more animals than before.

500N
24th Jan 2014, 21:15
"if the guy who arrives is a naked spear carrying aboriginal dont be afraid."

They still use spears to settle arguments up NT way.

A couple of years ago a Abo threw a shovel nosed spear through the
drivers side door of a Land Cruiser :rolleyes: (While the driver was in the car !).

Worrals in the wilds
24th Jan 2014, 21:24
Same up the Cape. It's cheaper than lawyers and arguably fairer. :E
The Cooktown Museum has an excellent display about the Indigenous culture in the area, including pictures and info about their traditional legal procedures (it also has the Endeavour's anchor and a great display showing written/verbal accounts about Cook's landing by both Cook and the local mob, and IMO is one of the best museums in Australia, housed in a lovely former convent with lots of info about the nuns who went there; well worth the trip :ok:).

Apparently each tribe had an hereditary Law Man (complete with silly ceremonial dress aka feathers and pigment, nothing really changes :hmm:) and disputes were brought before him for settlement. The defendant was entitled to have a representative who not only had to argue the defendant's case but also fend off spear attacks from the alleged victim's grumpy family while he was doing so :ouch:.

I took extensive photos/notes and sent them to various lawyer friends with the title 'you think it's tough down there in the city...' One of them thought it would still be preferable to the current Appeals process. :}

Metro man
24th Jan 2014, 23:26
I've hit two kangaroos while driving in the bush and I can imagine the damage if one went up and through the windscreen. In those days I couldn't afford a 4WD with roo bars.

onetrack
25th Jan 2014, 11:08
I've seen a Greyhound coach that hit a camel on the Nullarbor, and it was suffering from some major, major damage, I can tell you that much.

Has anyone successfully fixed a busted head gasket with jam? It was one of those 'get you out of trouble' tricks that was bandied around
Nope, never tried that - but I've successfully used four strands of fencing wire, twitched in pairs, to use as "jumper cables", to re-start a truck with a flat battery.
I ran the second vehicle for 15 mins with the "cables" attached, to assist in getting some charge into the flat truck battery.

probes
3rd Feb 2014, 21:20
incl. Coke and rust :), formulae and all:

Chemistry Life Hacks (Vol. 1) - Reactions - YouTube

ruddman
3rd Feb 2014, 21:42
Never tell your wife that your sister makes a better lasagna.

There's a survival tip right there.

Rule3
3rd Feb 2014, 22:04
Put a hole in the fuel tank of a HJ Holden on the old unmade, rock strewn, corrugated Coober Pedy to Alice Springs Road in the late 70s. Plugged it with soap and got back to Mt. Willoughby. They repaired the fuel tank, gave us a beer and put a cut open truck tube under the fuel tank as protection against flying rocks. Cost $10.

BenThere
3rd Feb 2014, 23:46
From what I read here, what better business could there be than building a comprehensive auto repair/hotel/pub in Alice?

500N
4th Feb 2014, 00:13
Except you'd have to live in Alice :O


Alice has quite a few problems, alcohol, social, Indigenous.

Quite a few Americans live there because of the "not so secret" base
just down the road.

BenThere
4th Feb 2014, 00:20
Only until I found a smart young Ppruner to run it.

500N
4th Feb 2014, 00:38
BenThere

You could do a remake of "Prescilla, Queen of the Desert" :O

BenThere
4th Feb 2014, 00:41
So, you wanna be a partner in this venture?

Airey Belvoir
4th Feb 2014, 00:44
Once dinged a 6' roo on the Kalbarri road when I was doing 110kph in my Defender. Hit it square on. It deflected to the side, did a couple of spins around a verge marker and lay very very still. The damage to the vehicle was a couple of very tiny dents in the roo bar.


Doing the Nullabor Adelaide-Perth at the end of April so we'll see what the wild life is like on that.

500N
4th Feb 2014, 00:47
BenThere
No, if I did anything it would be in Darwin.
Alice is in the middle of nowhere and not much to do around there
that I like to do outside of work.

Cars are also a lot more reliable nowadays than in the past.


Are you moving to Adelaide ?????

BenThere
4th Feb 2014, 01:02
Yes. Moving to Adelaide. Wife is there today looking at houses. I also know
Darwin, which is where I met her 20 years ago. Agree, Darwin is a natural for the China trade, but Alice is a natural for the inevitable interior growth.

Fantome
4th Feb 2014, 01:40
Five years ago stopping with old mate in Quorn, SA. We set off a dusk to drive 15 kms south to Pitchie Ritchie roadhouse for dinner. Harry skittled a big boomer half way there. Got out. Hardly a mark on the Landcruiser. But what makes the story so memorable . . . .. . he gave the roo a little CPR and heaved the bounder over the fence into a paddock . Roo propped himself up on one elbow, had a look around. Got up and took off at a leisurely pace into the mulga.

Alice the coming boom town? Could be. But not without significant work opportunities. Given a complete make over it could be a most pleasant
place to live, work and retire. Particularly for those who fall for the undeniable mystique of the red centre. Can't see it ever happening.

(P.S. have to say the racism used to be appalling)

500N
4th Feb 2014, 02:21
BenThere

Sorry, I have to agree with Fantome.

Lack of work / business opportunities as mentioned being the biggest killer.
Maybe some of the Indigenous social problems need to be worked through a bit more as well which seems to send a negative feel outwards.

Driving tourism through might be OK but Ayers Rock is not going too well
and that pulled a lot of people into Alice by itself.

"Particularly for those who fall for the undeniable mystique of the red centre."
mmmm, only last so long and the rest of the red centre is more open now as well.

Even Darwin is a bit small but lots more to do !

Pontius
4th Feb 2014, 06:42
Doing the Nullabor Adelaide-Perth at the end of April so we'll see what the wild life is like on that.

Done that. Roos, roos and roos. Only way to do it at night is to tuck in behind a road train; the roos don't seem to bother them.

MagnusP
4th Feb 2014, 07:36
I noticed that our electrician's Landie had a badly cut-up bonnet. "Vandals, eh?" said I. Nope. He'd hit a stag at night, thought "Great! Fresh roadkill for my mate the butcher to cut up for me", heaved it onto the bonnet, tied it on with some cable and set off for home. Then the stag woke up . . . . :p

dubbleyew eight
4th Feb 2014, 08:56
but Alice is a natural for the inevitable interior growth.

hmmmm.

in australia the bureau of metrology gives us rainfall figures.
what they dont give is the evaporation figures.:E

australia's interior will never develop until we see industrial size desalination plants feeding enough water into the centre of australia to make irrigation possible.
then once irrigation is possible the pest problem will need to be addressed.

rice was once grown experimentally at humpty doo quite successfully.
what killed the project is that the protected native birdlife ate the rice.

I could go on but suffice it to say "it aint like america mate" :E

500N
4th Feb 2014, 09:27
"the roos don't seem to bother them."
That is the polite way of saying the road trains plough straight through them
as opposed to not bother them !


W8
Or pipe excess water from up north (Katherine) to down south.

Ogre
4th Feb 2014, 10:12
Ben There

Welcome to Adelaide! Regardless of what the Sydney siders and Melbournians say it's not the back of beyond, but you don't have to go far out of town to hit roos on the way home at night.....

And there is always the Barossa!

Airey Belvoir

If you are going over the Nullbor you could always avail yourself of 18 holes of golf on the way. It breaks up the trip a bit....

Hydromet
4th Feb 2014, 10:28
in australia the bureau of metrology gives us rainfall figures.
what they dont give is the evaporation figures.

They're available, but you have to click on 'All Available', not 'Main Statistics'.

Alice Springs climate stats. (http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/averages/tables/cw_015590_All.shtml)

Airey Belvoir
4th Feb 2014, 14:34
Yep. Was thinking of looking out for a set of clubs when the council does it's next "bring out yer dead" kerb collection!

My best performance was some years ago when I managed a 5 under par on a 9 hole council pitch and putt course back in Doncaster in the UK. Mind you par was 856!!!

BenThere
4th Feb 2014, 15:08
All the relatives now live in or around Adelaide, except for two holdouts near Cairns.

The wife says she likes Gawler, both for affordability, access to Adelaide, and the allure of Barossa. I was more taken with Glenelg, but I really don't care, as all I need is a porch, hi-speed internet, a library and coffee shop, and a hardware store. And if I live in the country a bit I can still have a 12 gage and .22 if I'm not mistaken.

Development of Australia's interior is inevitable, and the challenges will be overcome. The US was little different 200 years ago. If you can buy 1,000 acres of temperate land out there for a song your grandchildren will worship you one day.

500N
4th Feb 2014, 15:21
BenThere

"And if I live in the country a bit I can still have a 12 gage and .22 if I'm not mistaken."

If you live in the city you can have those as well and anything up to a 50 cal
although SA is a bit touchy on 50 cals !

"If you can buy 1,000 acres of temperate land out there for a song your grandchildren will worship you one day. "

Er, Alice and a fair chunk of South Australia is classed as desert, not temperate. Temperate SA is a small strip along the coast. The next bit
is more Grassland than anything else.

I could think of other places to buy than 1,000 acres around Alice.

"Development of Australia's interior is inevitable, and the challenges will be overcome. "
Very little of the US interior is like the interior of Aus. The US has small pockets of desert, we have nearly whole states of desert (South Aus, Western Aus). I could think of far more places worthy of overcoming challenges tha trying to convert the desert to productive farmland - for a start, turning the farm land we already have into regular productive land instead of on an ad hoc basic.
Challenges are one thing, stupidity is another :O

500N
4th Feb 2014, 15:31
BenThere

If you know how to fish or like it, some great Surf fishing in SA !

BenThere
4th Feb 2014, 15:38
Central Valley California was once desert, too. But when it was irrigated it became the most productive farmland on earth.

When you buy Australian land fee simple, do you also acquire the mineral rights?

As for surf fishing, we might be able to swing a home in Gawler, and afford a getaway second home on the Gulf in a town that claims robust crabbing and a lively fishing culture.

500N
4th Feb 2014, 15:52
Yes, understand about California. They have already done it in Aus before,
up north. Do a search on Lake Argyle.

Re Mineral Rights, as a rule, no, the land owner does not own the minerals in the ground, the crown does (and not just the "Royal" minerals of Gold and Silver. Except of course some Aboriginals but that is another issue :}

Owning a second getaway home ties you to one place but the concept is good.
Darwin / NT has great crabbing :O (and fishing).

BenThere
4th Feb 2014, 16:07
The purpose for having a beach house is to be able to say 'Adios, I'm outahere", and have somewhere to go. Helps to keep the little woman in line.

500N
4th Feb 2014, 16:10
Ah, that explains it :O ;)

I don't have a "little woman", although I sometimes wonder if one would
not be better off with one than having my dog !

Fantome
4th Feb 2014, 16:34
Does not seem to make any sense at all to part with a dog that you love (and who is devoted to you) so as to start a relationship with anyone.

It has been shown since time immemorial that the happiest, fulfilled existence
is one that includes as a rock and foundation the close connubial shared life along with solitude when that becomes paramount. But how hard that is to come to as a way of being when the lifelong marriage of like minds can at the outset be a matter of sheer luck.. Or kismet. We probably all of us have known couples who every day are astonished by their great good fortune in each other.

The late Jim Cairns wrote a profound book that goes into the ideal life, the fate of mankind, - a distillation of a lifetime's study of people and societies. It's called 'Survival Now', curiously enough.

gupta
5th Feb 2014, 02:56
Quick note to BenThere:

hi-speed internet; &
I live in the country

are generally self-exclusive in Australia until the next broadband satellite goes up (supposedly in 2015)

We got caught by this when we bought our place only 8km outside Dungog - try 500kps max download speed on the mobile network (upload is comparable to the regular postal service), & a refusal to supply fixed line services as the "line quality isn't good enough" - Telstra, or "you are too far from the exchange" - resellers :mad:

Bang goes the idea of doing some remote officework from the farm :{

500N
5th Feb 2014, 03:04
Fantome

"Does not seem to make any sense at all to part with a dog that you love (and who is devoted to you) so as to start a relationship with anyone."

I think I left a smiley off the end of my post :O

I need a dog, she is my ears to danger and people being around as I am
so deaf I can't hear a lot of things (and is damn good at it, already warned
me about people in drive way who ran off). She is also good at sensing when
something is "not right".

TWT
5th Feb 2014, 03:28
These guys are quite creative:

wspwBcuOZFg
htQjF4MIUwM

probes
5th Feb 2014, 09:08
I would've thought I know how to split wood at least... oh no. :p

We've been splitting wood all wrong | MNN - Mother Nature Network (http://www.mnn.com/family/protection-safety/stories/weve-been-splitting-wood-all-wrong)


The basic shape and design of the axe hasn't changed in, well, millennia, as attested to by archaeological discoveries from around the world. At least, that was true until an enterprising Finn decided to rethink the way we chop wood.

The result is the Vipukirves, an axe that allows people to work smart, not hard. In addition, it's safer to use than a conventional axe, and the design will turn heads even if the speed of your wood chopping skills doesn't. The Vipukirves may just become a must-have in every woodshed and handyman's truck.


http://www.mnn.com/sites/default/files/user/132046/axe_200_0.jpg

MagnusP
5th Feb 2014, 09:25
Oooh, that looks interesting! Tried one, probes?

500N
5th Feb 2014, 09:48
I could see a few accidents happening with it or the bits that fly off.

probes
5th Feb 2014, 10:12
Oooh, that looks interesting! Tried one, probes?
not yet, but I've got a Finn-friend who helped me with firewood last summer - and hit his thumb (not cut off, thank God) -, so I'm hopeful...

dubbleyew eight
5th Feb 2014, 12:44
the last thing you want is an axe designed to curve as it hits.
must really shock load the wrists.
and for heavens sake they are only chopping pine.

I wouldn't get rid of a normal sharp axe for that one.

most of my firewood chopping was with a tomahawk.

Worrals in the wilds
6th Feb 2014, 11:05
In the invention stakes, hasn't it been trumped by this? :}
http://www.stihl.com.au/upload/produkte/images/gruppen/middle/remotebinaryCAWENIFO_Prof.jpg
Full marks for trying though.
I know I'm coming to the party late (been on the road :zzz:) but I tend to agree with the fellow Aussies re Alice Springs. Apart from the previously listed minuses it's a very long way away from everything, and this makes it expensive to transport stuff in and out. Of course various mine sites are also a long way away, but the minerals they dig out of the ground are valuable enough to make the hideous transport costs viable in the long run.

That said, prior to the mining boom/bust/boom etc. people would have laughed at you if you'd bought a motel in a town like Emerald or Singleton. These days they can charge $180 per night for a dog kennel and no-one blinks an eyelid, because they're neck deep in Mordor Mining Corporation consultants and assorted boffins who'll pay top dollar for a room with a loo and a door :\.

Maybe the Alice will have its day in the sun, in which case if BenThere has gotten in early and subsequently cashes in then good luck to him. :ok::} Me, I'd back Darwin as a fair certainty (and Cape York Penninsula as an outside bet, it's got the potential to go places with mining, tourism and potentially agriculture) but not Alice. Too dry and too far away...

Mind you, the bushy anscestors would have laughed their butts off if anyone had told them that in the early 21st century people would actually pay to cross the Simpson Desert for fun in large enough numbers to support several towns. :eek::} Likewise the whole grey nomad thing, so who knows what the future will bring?

500N
6th Feb 2014, 11:09
Worrals

Simpson desert - aaaahhhh, but the flowers :ok:

I reckon Cape York will get tied up with too many Aboriginal land issues.

Worrals in the wilds
6th Feb 2014, 12:01
Apparently there aren't too many flowers at the moment; very, very dry :(.
I reckon Cape York will get tied up with too many Aboriginal land issues. My impression (and it's only my impression based on a couple of trips) is that the people on the Cape are a lot more go-ahead than they get credit for. Look at Laura; only a few years ago it was beyond civilisation, but these days there's a small but growing tourism industry based around the Quinkan paintings. They've got guided tours, an art centre and a funky website. It's still all a bit rough around the edges, but they're giving it a red hot go.:ok:
Welcome | Aboriginal Art Centre Cultural Environment Heritage Indigenous Laura Natural Queensland Quinkan Regional Rock Traditional (http://quinkancc.com.au/)

The key point on that website? The new all-weather bridge. Tourists can now get there and (more importantly) get out again. The old Laura bridge is still visible and you'd have needed a dive certificate to cross it any time it rained. The new bridge is huge, expensive and IMO well worth while, if it opens up opportunities.

I think ready access has been a bigger development hindrance than any of our governments like to acknowledge, because then they'd then have to also acknowledge that they've failed to provide basic infrastructure to Queenslanders/Australians. Sure there'll be land issues, but like IR issues, they can be sorted out by sensible people sitting around a table and figuring out a solution that suits everyone, particularly if it means jobs and opportunities for locals. By and large it's worked in the Diamantina (among other places), so I don't see why the Cape should be so different.

500N
6th Feb 2014, 12:05
Good info. Might need to update my info re FNQ a bit !

Re bridges, yes, agree. The only reason the NT was opened up was because of the bridges / roads being passable 350 - 365 days of the year so FNQ would benefit greatly.

onetrack
7th Feb 2014, 10:29
I can recall driving Darwin to Port Augusta in 1969, and from Alice Southwards the road was a joke. Passable only in dry weather, and with only a couple of bridges in 1200kms. The creek crossings were only a couple of kms apart for many kms, and trucks were doing well to keep up 30kmh average speed.
Now, the endless bitumen only poses one major problem - boredom.

As an old prospector said to me once - "They reckon those highways cost $1M a km! You know what? It's worth every cent of it! When I arrived here in 1923, you spent more time driving in the bush, than on the road! - because you couldn't even call the road, a road! - it was just two rutted wheeltracks!".

We sorely need to upgrade a lot more infrastructure in the country - and water, energy and roads should be priorities.
With a couple of towns in Qld currently warning they will run out of water shortly, and possibly have to evacuate people, it just shows how much of a lag there has been in prioritising the important stuff - such as secure, drought-proof, water supplies.

500N
7th Feb 2014, 10:34
One track

In the 80's, only the main hwy was like that. Everything else was as described.

Did manage to do 100kmh on the birds vile track for a short distance !

dubbleyew eight
7th Feb 2014, 10:58
a kilometer of road just leads to the next kilometer of road.

a kilometer of runway can take you anywhere.
...unless you have an organisation like CASA regulating aviation and making it all illegal.:mad:

500N
7th Feb 2014, 11:09
W8

Out there, a km of flat road is also a km of runway :O

SawMan
7th Feb 2014, 11:32
500N, you mentioned earlier that cars are more reliable these days and it's true for most. But those of us who took proper care of our vehicles never noticed because most of the older breakdowns were related to poor maintenance. The 2 problems with today's cars is that you can't 'patch them up' in the middle of nowhere should they lay down on you. If you can't make it go within 5 minutes you might as well start walking. And after the tow and the repair shop are finished with you, the average repair costs you $500US- not an insignificant sum at all! My work truck is one of the last that could be fixed with almost nothing right where she quits well enough to get to where you can fix it properly. 317K miles on it and still all the original front end parts in good shape because it has grease fittings and I have a grease gun. I do have to spend time maintaining it but I prefer that because I can schedule it in- you can't schedule in breakdowns and their exorbitant costs.

And your dog. Mine too :ok: She's my eyes and ears while I'm here- hers are a lot better than mine! and it's not her fault if I do nothing when she tells me to. But she doesn't like strangers. She was about 2 years old when I got her and it took a year to build the full trust between us we have now. So when I'm not here, she's on guard duty. That's all I ask of her- she isn't trained to do anything else she doesn't want to do. When people ask what tricks I can make her do I say "None- she's too smart to fall for that crap, but she will eat you alive if you step on her turf. Is that a good enough trick?" :E Yup- my best friend has 4 legs and she's just outside my door. Always happy to see me, never complains, and just wants her place in my world and some attention occasionally. Can't get much better than that and she gets that and more from me. Best security system ever with no batteries to fail :cool:

A bunch of us smokers were out on a deep sea fishing day trip when the last guy's lighter died. We checked with everyone- no matches, no lighters, no way to make fire and a bunch of big burly guys getting edgier from nicotine withdrawal by the minute. Then in a flash I had an idea. I bummed a ciggie from the guy next to me from his nearly empty pack. As everyone watched I carefully tossed it overboard as I proudly proclaimed "There. Now the entire boat is a cigarette lighter." It was a long swim back to shore that day :oh:

probes
8th Mar 2014, 07:58
http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/2014-02/enhanced/webdr04/24/11/enhanced-3352-1393260538-1.jpg

27 Clever Ways To Use Everyday Stuff In The Kitchen (http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelysanders/clever-ways-to-use-everyday-stuff-in-the-kitchen)