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ZOOKER
18th Jan 2014, 22:15
Last week, the U.K. media reported on the fines imposed on a family who took 3 children on a family holiday, causing them to miss a week of their education.
Today, the same media are reporting on another pupil missing his education because he is on a trek to the south pole.
Will his parents also be appearing in court?

500N
18th Jan 2014, 22:26
I thought it was a bit OTT.

At / up to certain ages, itcan be beneficial to take Children on OS holidays,
they can learn more in one week than they could in a week at school.

My father took his grand kids and son / wife to Africa for 2 weeks during a school term, learnt heaps.

ShyTorque
18th Jan 2014, 22:51
It's in the terminology. Parents should ask permission for their child to attend a 7 day educational expedition overseas.

Capetonian
18th Jan 2014, 22:53
I'm quite impressed with those two youngsters from a very upmarket boarding school in Lancashire who did a bunk and ended up in the Dominican Republic!

llondel
19th Jan 2014, 00:10
Educate them at home, saves all the nonsense and avoids all the pointless school tests. Cheap term-time holidays, the ability to go to interesting places as the opportunity arises, be out and about in the world meeting people of all ages instead of the same 30 faces in the classroom each day. Plus if you do it right, the children discover that learning can be fun, and sometimes are learning a lot without even realising they're being educated.

Krystal n chips
19th Jan 2014, 06:31
Yes, it's a really clever idea to remove children from school during term time as they will no doubt be able to catch up on the subjects they missed. Quite when of course, is a minor detail which probably didn't actually occur to the parents, now being portrayed as some form of latter day folk heroes ( by some that is ) for defying the system.

Surely, if they were that concerned about the valid argument concerning the profiteering price rises imposed on a captive market, they would have been better off directing their efforts towards campaigning against these practices, although this would probably be equally futile as we know.

However, across the pond, the fearless cousins have a rather different approach to truancy.

High School Girls Shackled & Jailed for Skipping School - YouTube

Taken from one of those damn leftie liberal pinko Human Rights sites, a quaint illustration of the consummate bravery and dedication of Law Enforcement Officers engaged in the apprehension of the "perps"..:yuk: .....as they say.

Lets face it, those girls present a significant "clear and present danger"....one wishes to get the vernacular correct here, and thus the quicker they can be shackled the better !.......now what sort of, allegedly, civilised society feels that shackling girls for playing truant is justifiable I wonder?.

On the other hand, those valiant heroes performing the apprehension would be of interest to any aspiring anthropologist.....

Seldomfitforpurpose
19th Jan 2014, 07:01
Yes, it's a really clever idea to remove children from school during term time as they will no doubt be able to catch up on the subjects they missed. Quite when of course, is a minor detail which probably didn't actually occur to the parents, now being portrayed as some form of latter day folk heroes ( by some that is ) for defying the system.


You do make us giggle at time with some of your daftness :p

Kids have been going on holidays during term time since school and holidays were first invented. We took ours away on more than one occasion and it never did them a moments harm. Catching up was no more difficult that getting the work from classmates and erm catching up :p

Worrals in the wilds
19th Jan 2014, 08:07
...causing them to miss a week of their education.Was it the final week? If so, I recall a week's worth of cleaning out cupboards, mucking up and watching 'educational' movies to pass the time :hmm:. I can still recite Born Free frame by frame. The face of the PE teacher when she screened 'Nadia' (a good film about a gymnastics champion) and it got to a relatively lurid sex scene was a joy to behold :E. 'We'll just skip this part' she shrieked while lurching for the remote control as we all cheered loudly.

My point is that IME (all twelve years of it) was that the final week of school is a bit of a WOFTAM, so is there a big issue? I guess if it was exam week it might be a bit different, but as ShyTorque said, surely it's about communicating with the school prior to the leave rather than a law enforcement issue.

A work friend of mine routinely lets his son skip school to go fishing. I don't agree with it (and I've said so before) but as the kid isn't academic and wants to be a professional fisherman (trawler operator, which is a big industry here) when he grows up, sometimes I wonder if he's learning more with his dad than he does in the classroom. :confused:

probes
19th Jan 2014, 08:17
- probably, and also be in trouble when fish are discussed in class and he can't help correcting the teacher :E. (happened to someone I know, btw)

Vitesse
19th Jan 2014, 10:22
Teachers get all uppity if we take our kids out for a week, but it's fine when they want to strike...

The more I learn about my local secondary school (and it's apparently a good one) the less impressed I am.

Peter-RB
19th Jan 2014, 10:34
Hey Capetonian,

That College is about 11 miles from me, all my tribe were there until last year, but now it seems they are taking children from backgrounds of disasters from the past,( mainly due to the business and banking situation here in the UK) sadly the Boy who has dual Nationality and his Kazak sweetheart have past history,..the College took a risk with them and its backfired... seems the punishment will be harsh and permenant when(or upon) their return.:ouch:
Still not certain that they are actually in the Caribean, their first stop was France!

Peter R-B
Lancashire

Toadstool
19th Jan 2014, 10:54
Thank god my son's school and head teacher allow some leeway with this issue. I am away a minimum of 4 months a year, and the head understands that my son needs time with his family, regardless of the time of year. It is incumbent upon myself to ensure that he catches up on what he misses and that we do not take him out during critical phases. As said previously, you just have to ask the school first.

The reason why some if not most parents do this is the ridiculous situation whereby holiday companies raise the prices as soon as the school holidays start. I hear all the stories about hotels etc having to increase staff to cope with the added numbers, but whatever happened to supply and demand. More people going = more money in to cope with the required staff. This is just a blatant money making scheme!!!:\

radeng
19th Jan 2014, 11:16
In my school days in Nottinghamshire, parents were allowed to take the kids out for two weeks a year provided they received permission from the school for those particular weeks - obviously, just before and during exam weeks wasn't allowed.

Sunnyjohn
19th Jan 2014, 12:15
Yes, it's a really clever idea to remove children from school during term time as they will no doubt be able to catch up on the subjects they missed.You do make us giggle at time with some of your daftness
To be fair to K&C, judging by his remarkable ability with English, I think he is speaking from experience. :)

cockney steve
19th Jan 2014, 12:18
Child 1 after a holiday in zumerset, where the foreshore had slabs of slate, full of fossils, sticking out.
" Miss, i got fossils here...it's mud what got compressed millions of years ago.....etc."

"Rubbish! Slate is a form of rock......."

Following day, humbled teacher makes apology and retraction in front of class.

Child3...mum, can I make a sponge-cake for school tomorrow...yes, why? we were told to bring an egg and a packet of Mary Crockas*it mix to learn how to "bake a cake"
Writes recipe out....takes to school, bangs it on teacher's desk and thrusts recipe in front of her...that's how you bake a cake, I'm off,you aren't wasting my time.
he went off to tinker with the computers......a job that he makes a very comfortable living from nowadays.

Don't take prisoners, my kids....they would have verbally shredded any jobsworth who dared infer their teachers were superior to what the kids learned for themselves.

teeteringhead
19th Jan 2014, 12:30
Following day, humbled teacher makes apology and retraction in front of class. At least there was an apology!

Heard a comparable tale a few years ago, when the pupil dared to correct Teach who stated that a kilometre was longer than a mile! :eek:

No retraction, not even when raised subsequently at parents' evening. Teach said something along the lines of:

"It's not the facts that matter, but that the child was not taking the teacher's word!" :eek::eek:

And no, it wasn't in 1930s Germany, but 21st Century UK .........

Cumulogranite
19th Jan 2014, 13:23
The problem is that the schools are no longer permitted (since a change in regulations last year) to authorise any absence, bye bye 10 days in term time. So now I am looking at spending 2k on a 1200 holiday thanks to the profiteering holiday companies !!!! There are the feckless idiots for whom a child is the latest fashion accessory and have little enthusiasm for making sure they get a good education and indeed the law should jump all over these herberts, but why take it out on those of us that do ensure our child's education. Is paramount!!'

charliegolf
19th Jan 2014, 13:26
Educate them at home,

Clucking Bell! I love my daughter to bits. But 16 hours a day? Sheesh.

CG

Capetonian
19th Jan 2014, 13:29
When my son was at school, if he had to take a day or two off when we were travelling, a letter to the teacher(s) concerned saying that due to travel plans/family event, he would not be at school on the following dates ..... and if they could please ensure that any schoolwork or reading that had to be done was assigned in advance, was never questioned or disputed.

charliegolf
19th Jan 2014, 13:31
Teachers get all uppity if we take our kids out for a week, but it's fine when they want to strike...

No we don't, we don't give a toss;
No it isn't, and it hardly ever happens.

And whilst not giving a toss (still), 99.9% of holidays taken in term time have not a gnat's cock sized educational value to them. (In my opinion.)

And breathe....

CG

edited to point out that educational content is not the reason for the holiday in that 99.9% of absences.

charliegolf
19th Jan 2014, 13:33
Thank god my son's school and head teacher allow some leeway with this issue. I am away a minimum of 4 months a year, and the head understands that my son needs time with his family, regardless of the time of year. It is incumbent upon myself to ensure that he catches up on what he misses and that we do not take him out during critical phases. As said previously, you just have to ask the school first.

The reason why some if not most parents do this is the ridiculous situation whereby holiday companies raise the prices as soon as the school holidays start. I hear all the stories about hotels etc having to increase staff to cope with the added numbers, but whatever happened to supply and demand. More people going = more money in to cope with the required staff. This is just a blatant money making scheme!!!

I am 'outing' you as a balanced and completely normal parent of a school aged child. You have no place on Pprune. :ok:

CG

charliegolf
19th Jan 2014, 13:38
When my son was at school, if he had to take a day or two off when we were travelling, a letter to the teacher(s) concerned saying that due to travel plans/family event, he would not be at school on the following dates ..... and if they could please ensure that any schoolwork or reading that had to be done was assigned in advance, was never questioned or disputed.

See above Cape, your name is in the book too!:ok:

CG

Fox3WheresMyBanana
19th Jan 2014, 13:38
Truancy is a symptom, not a cause of educational problems. Basically, the kids are either bored or frightened.

I have no objections to any kid taking as much time off as their parents wish - best reason was 'a month to sail the Atlantic' - but in state schools the school is effectively held responsible for lack of progress of the kid and penalised for 'unauthorised' absence, and 'holidays' in term time are now regarded by the DfE as unauthorised absence.

The DfE is to blame, not the school or teacher. Furthermore, it is the DfE's failures to promote interesting curricula and deal with bullying which cause truancy in the first place, coupled with the Government failing to do anything about feckless parents.

charliegolf
19th Jan 2014, 13:51
Whilst enjoying bantering Zooker's starter:

Last week, the U.K. media reported on the fines imposed on a family who took 3 children on a family holiday, causing them to miss a week of their education.

I have not seen the report, so don't know if the children were bad attenders to start with; always 'ill' when the school could see clearly they are not.

It is a legal requirement that where children are on the roll of a school, they go there every day it is open. Unless there is a good reason not to.

In my area, the flexibility I traditionally had (still have really, under the law) to authorise up to 10 days a year for hols has been taken away. I still ask for the parents to inform me, so that there are no CP worries when they seem to disappear from sight.

Further, having a big Indian contingent, I recognised that popping to India for a fortnight when you work in a min wage environment here doesn't make good sense. So I would authorise a month.

I recently helped a school out in a deprived area- arrived in late March, attendance 78% for the school. Left in July having raised it to 95% for those 4 months. Since I left it has been 93+% every week to Christmas.

Common sense ain't so common any more, but being in school more than being out is a no brainer.

CG

Gertrude the Wombat
19th Jan 2014, 14:44
the ridiculous situation whereby holiday companies raise the prices as soon as the school holidays start
Eh?? - it's not ridiculous, is the market in operation, exactly as expected. You charge what you can get. If the prices were too high people wouldn't pay them.

racedo
19th Jan 2014, 15:17
The problem is that the schools are no longer permitted (since a change in regulations last year) to authorise any absence, bye bye 10 days in term time. So now I am looking at spending 2k on a 1200 holiday thanks to the profiteering holiday companies !!!! There are the feckless idiots for whom a child is the latest fashion accessory and have little enthusiasm for making sure they get a good education and indeed the law should jump all over these herberts, but why take it out on those of us that do ensure our child's education. Is paramount!!'

Yup unfortunately. Kid go a RC school with kids from all over the world and not possible for 2 weeks in August for many.

SWMBO had a great uncle being honoured for what he did in WW2, he was a busy little bee, even afterwards. Lecture and unveiling of Plague involved plus meeting some Vets. School declined request for day off as they told they have to do this and SWMBO worried about it, I said you going with them.

As expected kids got more from the day that being in class and brought in summary of what he had done to read to class. Teachers attitude was, more important to have attended that one day here, head even asked about it and said have to adhere to rules laid down by council, they audit but expects parents to make the correct calls.

Personally want to do 4 weeks in Crimland............sorry Australia one Christmas so will get butt kicked for that but seeing how the other half live upside is a good idea.:E

Vitesse
19th Jan 2014, 16:01
Hey, CG, keep breathing!

Biggest gripe I have with teachers at my kid's school is that having attempted to commit a Jimmy Saville type offence against a couple of pupils (sober witnesses etc, no question his of intent) one individual was 'investigated' and had it all brushed under the carpet and took a school group abroad a couple of weeks later.

So when I get moaned at for a week's skiing holiday, I tend to stick two fingers up...

Dushan
19th Jan 2014, 17:07
The reason why some if not most parents do this is the ridiculous situation whereby holiday companies raise the prices as soon as the school holidays start. I hear all the stories about hotels etc having to increase staff to cope with the added numbers, but whatever happened to supply and demand. More people going = more money in to cope with the required staff. This is just a blatant money making scheme!!!:\

Of course it is a money making "scheme". Why not? Why should a hotel, or any business for that matter, give its product away without making money? When the demand increases the prices go up. Look at airline travel. Look at the stock market. Capitalism at work!!!:ok:

llondel
19th Jan 2014, 17:13
Of course it is a money making "scheme". Why not? Why should a hotel, or any business for that matter, give its product away without making money? When the demand increases the prices go up. Look at airline travel. Look at the stock market. Capitalism at work!!!http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif

So the parents who work out that by paying a 200 fine to pay 1000 less for the holiday, coming out 800 ahead should be applauded. If the government don't like that then they should adjust the level of fines appropriately. Market forces at work.

ShyTorque
19th Jan 2014, 17:22
Racedo, did the vets manage to sort out the plague unveiled on that day? ;)

One family not far from here seemed to live on the edge of criminality. Their daughter was a classmate of my own offspring. They took numerous term time holidays using cheap offers from the newspapers (1 Sun holiday, anyone?). Neither of the parents smoked but the real purpose of these holidays was to return with suitcases full of cigarettes which were sold via their back door. Customs eventually got wind of this after a random stop and although they were allowed to go on their way on that occasion, because it couldn't be proved that they weren't for their own use (cough) they were told that they were on a watch list. They saw the 100 penalty from the education authority as an acceptable risk.

They say that crime doesn't pay - although I can't say if this continues these days, I do know that the family now own three houses between them. Not bad for a part time village window cleaner...... :hmm:

Dushan
19th Jan 2014, 17:40
From purely monetary point of view, yes they should be applauded. However, they should take into consideration the non-monetary values they are installing in their children. They are teaching their children that breaking the rules is ok. Are those children, once they join the workforce, going to make their own rules when they go on vacation or are they going to abide by the company policy which may not be very flexible.

racedo
19th Jan 2014, 17:41
Racedo, did the vets manage to sort out the plague unveiled on that day? http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif


Twas all done by a History student who has done the research in huge level of detail and worked it through. SWMBO indicated that person had pretty much organised it all and ensured it occurred. As it didn't involve any members of his family she was impressed what was done, figure he will go far because had a passion for it.

Gertrude the Wombat
19th Jan 2014, 18:05
If the government don't like that then they should adjust the level of fines appropriately.
For some reason they don't do that, cf parking fines that are cheaper than paying to park legally.

racedo
19th Jan 2014, 18:07
To be fair I new someone whose darling started skool in Sept, want to take 5 days off and told by head we will fine you x, then said of course taking 4 1/2 days off we wouldn't.

radeng
19th Jan 2014, 21:56
When I was at school in the early '60s, a classic cockup occurred. One lad taken to hospital as an emergency ruptured appendix at 0200 one morning, parent telephoned school at 0900, message mislaid and school creating hell 5 days later because they said they hadn't been told. Police sent to parents and most pis*ed off when referred to hospital!

ZOOKER
19th Jan 2014, 22:58
It's a funny old world.
Neither Mum or Dad drove. Both enjoyed a pint or two and some of John Player's finest??
We had relatives in Lancashire, and would meet up occasionally at Blackpool lights. I think I had 4 weeks playing truant on The Fylde Peninsula, every September 1965-1968.
We walked miles, saw ships coming out of Preston docks, rode on trams, some of which were built at the factory where Dad worked. I saw Edwardian and Victorian Seaside engineering, and saw lots of interesting shells on the beach We stood and watched the Irish Sea 'boiling' and Dad said that was the tail-end of a 'hurricane'. I first saw the silhouettes of Black Combe and The Coniston Fells from the North Pier. One day I saw an Autair Ambassador climb out of Squire's Gate, en-route to Ronaldsway. amazing.
I spent hours at the top of Blackpool Tower, watching the lights come on and talking to the friendly uniformed attendants who pointed out Snowdonia and The isle Of Man. I danced with Mum across the Tower Ballroom, to get a closer look at Reginald Dixon and 'The Mighty Wurlitzer'.
I was fascinated by the wartime spotlight that shone from the top of The Tower each evening and at the hotel we stayed at, our host was into hi-fi sound reproduction. That's where I first heard a Hammond Organ, (courtesy of Hans Last), which lead to a lifetime's love of rock, blues, soul and jazz.
Often, when returning from these trips, I had to write essays about what I had seen.
Did those 4 weeks affect my education? Maybe. I didn't go to Grammar School, Oxford, Cambridge or Eton.
Just 9 'O's, 2 'A's, a Nottingham 2:2 BSc Jt Hons in Geology/ Physical Geography, subjects which still interest me greatly.
The day I saw that Airspeed Ambassador speeding towards 'Alcatraz', I had no idea how I would earn a living, but something obviously 'clicked'.
I ended-up spending 30 years in one of the world's finest professions, talking to aeroplanes routing from Squire's Gate to Ronaldsway, (and many other places too).
I have always had great respect for teachers, especially in the increasingly difficult environment in which they have to work.
But it's wrong that these parents have been labelled as 'criminals' for taking their children on a 'field-trip' the 'Education Authority' couldn't provide.

MarcK
19th Jan 2014, 23:07
In the US, you can't be fined for skipping school. Our daughter missed school several times to attend and participate in regional and national horse shows.

But the school sometimes retaliates by suspending the student. :ugh:

MG23
19th Jan 2014, 23:20
Are those children, once they join the workforce, going to make their own rules when they go on vacation or are they going to abide by the company policy which may not be very flexible.

No-one forces them to work; they agree to whatever terms they agree to when they accept a job. I've never had a problem finding jobs with flexible vacation policies.

They have no choice about school rules. Oh, sure, the parents could, in theory, pay tens of thousands of pounds a year to send them to a private school that recognizes they're supposed to serve the kids, rather than the kids serving the school, but in practice, 99% of kids are sent to the only school available.

Government schools are designed to create production-line drones who blindly obey stupid rules. Those are the very last kind of workers we need to be producing in a post-industrial economy where all the production lines have moved to China. Kids who ignore stupid school rules will do far better over the next few decades than those getting gold stars for obedience.

cockney steve
19th Jan 2014, 23:49
^^^^^ Well said, MG23 Government schools are designed to create production-line drones who blindly obey stupid rules
No. 3 child actually said as much to the idiot cookery teacher. Also pointed out that the Loca Authority had a statutory obligation to
"educate every child according to it's needs" and they were failing to meet that obligation.
He is damned good at his job and entirely self-taught. very independent thinker and has left more than one employerbecause he didn't like the direction they were going in.

CoodaShooda
20th Jan 2014, 00:40
I'm finding this thread on a foreign education system quite fascinating; particularly the apparent focus on quantity rather than quality.

Coodakid1 missed significant periods in high school through school sanctioned events such as national sports competitions and cultural exchanges. She's now in her final year of Landscape Architecture (Hons).

Coodakid2 missed even more through exclusions and the attention of 'special educators'. It was only after we got him out of the education system that his significant hearing problems were identified and addressed. He's now doing well in the business world.

Coodakid3 missed 75% of years 9 and 10 through illness but was still advanced to years 11 (missed 25%) and 12 (got there most of the time). He was awarded his Bachelor of Business last year.

So tell me again that classroom attendance is a pre-requisite to success. (Of course, this may only apply to Australia. :E)

llondel
20th Jan 2014, 01:48
So tell me again that classroom attendance is a pre-requisite to success.

The flawed assumption of those wielding the rule book is that something useful happens in class while the child is there, and that the child is paying enough attention to benefit from it.

A typical GCSE is probably about 160 hours of classroom time spread out over two years. That's a month of full-time work, and probably less for a motivated student.

My father took me on various interesting trips - I got to see the Coalite works and an open-cast coalmine in operation, among other things. Far more interesting and instructive than what I'd probably have been doing in school on those days. I asked him a few years ago and he said he never asked the school for permission in advance.

I have a very low opinion of the modern state education system. I don't blame the teachers, they're stuck being micromanaged by successive governments to the point where they can't really teach properly any more because of all the useless stuff they have to get through with the class each year.

SawMan
20th Jan 2014, 02:55
My Dad was career military with a penchant for getting kicked around to different bases across the US quite regularly. Us kids were always playing 'catch-up' with our schooling, but in doing that we learned how to learn more quickly along with the value of sticking with it until you get it. And most of our schooling was done off-base at the local public schools. The world was different then to be sure.

Nowadays I hear my co-workers speak of not being able to drop their kids off at school before a certain time, of having to wait hours to pick them up because the school went on lock-down because of a police event that happened a few miles away, of having to pay fee after fee for things that are not truly educatimg them, and of having to send their kids to school while sick because of mandatory attendance requirements, knowing full well that the school will send the kids right back home an hour later. Had any of this crap happened with my Dad around there would have been a school shooting- Dad shooting whoever it was that was messing with his kids, holding them against his and their will, trying to milk him for money that was being wasted, or trying to usurp his parental authority. I'm glad I don't have any kids because I feel much like my Dad did about this subject.

Kids do not belong to the school, they do not belong to some government, and the parents alone should have the final word on what goes on with their children. This is why I know so many parents who now home-school their kids, or pay heaps of money to get their children into private schools. Those kids come out a lot more prepared for life and a career than the ones being bullied by the schools and governments (and that's all that this crap is- bullying). I've watched most of those kids do well while those who were in public schools rarely do well at all. It's not just the quality of the education either- it's the fact that the kids not in the system can think for themselves, while the ones from public schools have been trained to just do what they're told and don't question anything.

If you really want to know where it was lost, go read "Suffer Little Children" by Max Rafferty. It was written in the early 60's but it tells from way back then everything that has happened since and why it's turned out this way. I must warn you that after reading this book, if your kids aren't in a private school or being home-schooled, they soon will be.

reynoldsno1
21st Jan 2014, 02:24
...causing them to miss a week of their education.
r1jr once missed a week of her elementray education so she could visit some of her family in Thailand, and attend a monk's initiation of a cousin. We told the school, and her class teacher said that she wouldn't actually be missing any education at all, and could she do a 'show and tell' for the whole class when she returned ...

Capetonian
21st Jan 2014, 07:02
.... and that reminds me of when we took my son to a family event at a private game reserve in the Kruger National Park and coincided with a total eclipse of the sun. He was about 6 at the time and we told him to make a notebook with sketches and photos and on his return it was passed round the class and he gave a little talk about things that most of the other kids had never experienced, and perhaps never would.

Back to those two youngsters, having done something similar myself when I was that age, although not quite on such a grand scale, I have every sympathy with them, in fact I admire them, and if the lad were my son I'd be quite proud of him although I might not tell him so!

charliegolf
21st Jan 2014, 07:08
Back to those two youngsters, having done something similar myself when I was that age, although not quite on such a grand scale, I have every sympathy with them, in fact I admire them, and if the lad were my son I'd be quite proud of him although I might not tell him so!

Am I to assume that had they subsequently been murdered by criminals (rather than having a short 5* break at your expense) on DR, you wouldn't be baying for blood back at the school? As in, "My poor boy would be alive if not for the callous disregard the school showed for his safety".

If so, good on you.

CG

Capetonian
21st Jan 2014, 07:13
A good point, but I take the view that based on the backgrounds of both, they are probably street wise enough to keep out of harm's way. Also, we are exposed to danger all around us, look at that 60 year old couple on a sailing trip who were attacked in St. Lucia last week and the husband killed. People get murdered in Liverpool (*) on a Saturday night out. We can't mollycoddle our children for ever, they have to be given some freedoms in order to learn responsibility, all we can do is hope we've done enough to warn them of the dangers they are exposed to.

It doesn't seem as if the school showed 'callous disregard for their safety', it seems they were pretty smart in escaping. People escape from high security prisons.

(*) That was not meant to be offensive to Liverpool or its inhabitants in any way, it's one of my favourite cities. I mentioned it because it is near the school in question.

Alloa Akbar
21st Jan 2014, 08:31
As was pointed out earlier, kids have been taken out of school for family hols since Billy Butlin was a red-coat, without serious disaster befalling their lives.. Why bugga around making up and enforcing rules that achieve not a lot, and only deny some kids a holiday, as some parents can only afford holidays at the cheaper prices.

charliegolf
21st Jan 2014, 08:40
Like I said- good on you.:ok:

racedo
21st Jan 2014, 11:38
This is why I know so many parents who now home-school their kids, or pay heaps of money to get their children into private schools. Those kids come out a lot more prepared for life and a career than the ones being bullied by the schools and governments (and that's all that this crap is- bullying). I've watched most of those kids do well while those who were in public schools rarely do well at all. It's not just the quality of the education either- it's the fact that the kids not in the system can think for themselves, while the ones from public schools have been trained to just do what they're told and don't question anything.

I've gone from a never in Private school to a IF I can afford it attitude because I look at the UK league tables and think that it could add 10% onto the grades and force the kids to stretch themselves more.

radeng
21st Jan 2014, 12:34
Realistically, the business of not allowing two weeks off in a suitable time in the term is a bureaucratic rule introduced by some jobsworth - probably a PC jobsworth at that.

panda-k-bear
21st Jan 2014, 12:46
I grew up in a British seaside town with parents who worked in the leisure industry. Their busiest periods coincided with the school holidays - well they would, wouldn't they?

There was never any way my parents, nor scores of others like them with kids in the town's schools, could take time off over the school holidays. They'd have been bankrupt. The schools knew this and tolerated the annual 2-week holiday in term time that people took.

So what's the PC solution to that little gem? People who work in the leisure industry shouldn't have holidays if they have kids? Or they shouldn't have kids? Or perhaps the schools in those areas should adjust their holidays - perhaps half terms and the like - to a different week than the rest of the country?

Just curious as, seemingly, one rule fits all.

Effluent Man
21st Jan 2014, 12:57
Coincidence,I too grew up in a seaside town.Two mates and myself were habitual truants,but we refined the technique by going in to get our mark in the register then doing one over the fence at the bottom of the games field.We did this two or three half days a week for the lessons we didn't like and usually went to the town lihrary.
One of my mates became a lecturer in English at a university,the other is MD of a company with two thousand employees.All three of us are from working class backgrounds and went to Secondary Modern.,well,sometimes.