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OFSO
16th Jan 2014, 13:55
I sent an e-mail to an arts foundation requesting to be taken off their electronic mailing list.

They e-mailed me back saying they could not find the e-mail address of mine which I had asked to be removed from their mail list.

Their e-mail saying this was sent to the e-mail address that they couldn't find.

I am beginning to suspect there's no hope for the planet.

vulcanised
16th Jan 2014, 14:19
Is there nothing (in tiny writing, hidden away) on their mailshot where you can click to unsubscribe?

Alloa Akbar
16th Jan 2014, 14:31
Could be worse OFSO.. My Boss got an e-mail yesterday from a mate of his, in which said mate, forwarded an e-mail from mates wife telling mate (Still following??) that she was leaving him for another man.. So Boss sends e-mail back to mate saying along the lines of "Chin up son, I hated her anyway the selfish fat cow you are far too good for her.. etc etc etc".. Guess who he sent the mail to..?? Oh yes! :ugh:

Oh how we laughed when he got the reply.. :}

probes
16th Jan 2014, 14:39
They e-mailed me back saying they could not find the e-mail address of mine which I had asked to be removed from their mail list.

:D
yeah, virtual reality is tricky. Especially with lists...

OFSO
16th Jan 2014, 15:11
Is there nothing (in tiny writing, hidden away) on their mailshot where you can click to unsubscribe?

No, or I would have used it. What it does say is if you wish to unsubscribe send us a mail to this address. Whereupon they answer to say they have no record of sending e-mails to you !

Effluent Man
16th Jan 2014, 15:54
Reminds me of the Scotsman who sent a letter to his nephew saying " I would have sent you a fiver,but I had already sealed the envelope"

Fareastdriver
16th Jan 2014, 17:58
Good excuse. Must remember that.

OFSO
16th Jan 2014, 19:39
...I believe the entire sentence also included "...and I ran all the way to the postbox when I realised it, but the postman had just emptied the box..."

Romeo Oscar Golf
16th Jan 2014, 19:57
I dont wish to be a clever clogs, but it is not necessary to have an E-mail address in ones records to return a message to the sender. Simply hit the "reply" button. Maybe, trying to be positive, they were trying to reassure you that no more meesages would be forthcoming from them.......on the other hand......:hmm:

ExSp33db1rd
16th Jan 2014, 21:14
I am beginning to suspect there's no hope for the planet.

Korrekt.

World's Gone Mad
( am I the only one who thinks is was less stressful before computers ? )

reynoldsno1
16th Jan 2014, 23:14
Some years ago the only way I finally cancelled a subscription to a book club was to tell them I was dead ...

TWT
16th Jan 2014, 23:50
I bet they wanted a copy of the death certificate too !

cattletruck
17th Jan 2014, 01:03
My brother who supports a few charities started getting 2 to 3 letters per day from all sorts of quasi charities requesting money. Leaches the lot of them.

I decided to help him out by calling the charities and asking he be removed. This sort of worked for a brief period but they just can't help themselves and the requests for money just kept pouring in.

During one call to some obscure womens cancer charity interstate, it became obvious that I was talking to a very small operation and the lady on the other end was being helpful. So I asked her where she got my brother's details from and she said there are a number of organisations that sell lists. She was kind enough to give me the phone number of the organisation she used.

So I called this marketting organisation and eventually got hold of someone in charge (of something). The guy sounded like a complete tosser who couldn't give a hoot. I explained to him the situation and he said he would do something about it - bullsh!t he did.

So with all those letters requesting money appearing daily I seriously considered a Pprune idea of wrapping a house brick in paper and sticking the reply-paid envelope on it. But I was concerned someone may return the brick through the window as I would be sending so many bricks (I had the capacity).

I even considered building a wall out all those requests for money and using it as an art exhibition.

Mysteriously, the requests for donations suddenly died down to trickle, how I don't know. But I should have used that "passed away" line from the very start.

Hydromet
17th Jan 2014, 02:08
The only way I could stop one particular charity from calling was to send them a 'receipt required' letter telling them of my charges for answering soliciting calls. $50 gets 2 minutes of my time, then it's $20/min or part thereof.

llondel
17th Jan 2014, 03:38
Stopping an email list is easy here. If the proper procedure doesn't work, a line in the spam filter means it all starts bouncing back and undeliverable. Some places are properly organised and their set-up will remove the address and no more is sent, other places seem to have no way of handling rejects and it's still bouncing mail to them years later.

As for the phone, the apartment phone here rings occasionally, I check the caller ID and then ignore it. If it's a new one I look it up on Google and then ignore it.

Blacksheep
17th Jan 2014, 07:37
We bought a new phone recently and I uploaded our contacts list. When selecting a ring tone, I found I could set it to silent for callers who are not in the contacts list. No more nuisance calls from foreign based call centres. Job done.

My e-mail is set to sort messages according to lables. Each contact has a lable - Family, Work, School etc and the biggest one- Everything Else. There are two hundred messages in there waiting my attention at the moment. Fat chance

Groundgripper
17th Jan 2014, 08:12
I've found that BT is quite good at sorting out the spam from the serious messages and keeping them away from my email program as long as my browser is opened first. Every so often I look through the spam and very rarely find anything that shouldn't be there. It's also intriguing to see the email addresses from which messages are sent informing me that my bank/paypal/HMRC adount has been suspended.:E

GG

Worrals in the wilds
17th Jan 2014, 11:10
Some years ago the only way I finally cancelled a subscription to a book club was to tell them I was dead ...
Glad it worked for you. My dear aunt gave lots of money to a number of charities and when she died I contacted them to advise that she was deceased... which didn't stop all the emails, letters and requests for cash :uhoh: (in fairness I also received several condolence/thanks for the gifts cards too, including a lovely hand written letter from a Father Zbugu (or similar) from a mission in Africa :ok:. That was nice).

I found the worst and most crassly persistent were the local domestic animal rights charities. Finally I sent three of them a card saying 'She's dead. You're next!' which seemed to work, though she wouldn't have thanked me and it was technically an offence. :E

teeteringhead
17th Jan 2014, 11:59
In far distant pre-email days I once had a short-notice posting and so change of address.

Writing from the new address, I informed a number of organisations - banks etc - that this was in use with immediate effect.

Yep - you guessed it - most of the acknowledgements went ot the old address ..... :ugh::ugh:

Capetonian
17th Jan 2014, 12:16
What ticks me off about these charities is that once they have got hold of your details they constantly hound you for more donations in a manner that makes you feel guiltly, for example sending you picture cards that have been painted by mouth by a Cambodian orphan who had his limbs blown off by a landmine, and so on. I truly feel sorry for these people and I also know that most of us are infinitely better off in every way than they are, but I resent being reminded of this all the time.

It also seems a waste of money as I long ago stopped responding and stuff goes on the fire/recycling pile, but I suppose they've worked out that there is a good rate of return of they would no longer do it.

ShyTorque
17th Jan 2014, 12:18
In far distant pre-email days I once had a short-notice posting and so change of address.

Writing from the new address, I informed a number of organisations - banks etc - that this was in use with immediate effect.

Yep - you guessed it - most of the acknowledgements went ot the old address .....

This happened to me, but it was the UK Tax man! We were living abroad but some income I had was subject to UK tax, which had always been deducted at source. I was about to come back to UK on termination of my overseas contract so I wrote to the UK tax man, six months in advance, explaining all this in detail.

I gave the date of return, my new UK address, my new UK employer. I also told them that the address from which I wrote would cease to exist because the place was being razed to the ground for redevelopment.

I got no correspondence from them for over a year, by which time I was working in UK again and paying under PAYE. They had "traced" me through my bank and had fined me for not submitting a tax return, as they had decided I needed to submit. Guess where their letters had been going...

To place that no longer existed.

I then found out that the different UK tax offices used computer systems that weren't "joined up" and they didn't communicate effectively with each other by other means. One office had been deducting all the tax that I owed (in fact, I got a big refund - they had taken too much). The original office, dealing with me whilst overseas, saw me as a defaulter because they didn't read their incoming paper mail properly and wasted tax payers' money on airmail letters that were going nowhere.

Hydromet
17th Jan 2014, 21:36
When I changed addresses and notified my credit union, they replied to my old address, confirming that my address had been changed, but that if I received their reply at my old address it may have been done fraudulently, without my knowledge, and I should contact them immediately.

Seems like a reasonable approach.:ok:

dubbleyew eight
18th Jan 2014, 05:08
these things arent all doom and gloom you know.

I read Readers Digest every month for most of my youth.
It eventuated that father had subscribed for one year, thought it not worth the cost, and cancelled the subscription.
we received if for another 20 years free of charge.

oh yes, years ago now I changed addresses during a move. not only did the aviation safety digest arrive in the mail at the new address but the newsletter/magazine of the commercial fisheries association.
as something completely outside my sphere of activity I found reading technical discussions on benthic and pelagic fishing quite interesting.

if you are an international auster club member last month you also got the magazine of the european piano music teachers association. that publisher stuff up has put me off learning the piano for life. :E

the stuffups arent all bad.

Capetonian
18th Jan 2014, 05:15
I joined one of those deals with a publisher of coffee table books where you get the first one for next to nothing and then if 'not entirely satisfied write to us and we won't send you any more and you will have nothing to pay'. After the getting the first one, which was about the Himalayas, I wrote and asked them to stop. They acknowledged my email and continued to send the rest of the series and never asked for any money.

About two years ago I took out a subscription to Time magazine, which is a waste of space and paper, for my son. It was extremely inexpensive. It expired at least six months ago and they still send it, along with encouragements to renew. As I paid by cheque, with this in mind, they can't debit me. I suppose this is one point in favour of cheques, which I hear are going to be redundant soon.

radeng
18th Jan 2014, 10:40
Some years ago, I had a credit card from Citibank. Sent them a cheque to pay that month's bill - just under 4,000 - and got a letter some time later saying I hadn't paid and to contact them urgently. Wanted urgent contact did they? So why did the dimwits send the letter SECOND class? Good job I had other credit cards. I sent them the minimum payment to get the card reactivated, complete with, as requested, photocopy of the front and back of my original cheque as obtained from my Bank. Sent it recorded delivery - sign for - and they lost the photocopy! Said I shouldn't have sent with a cheque....

Telephoning was generally useless as only one person there seemed to have any intelligence. She was a young lady with an Indian name and a Manchester accent you could cut and spread with a knife. When she said she would call back within the hour, she did - even when I was in Boston (Mass, not Lincs). If she had to tell me that things were stalling and she didn't have an answer, at least she called to say so. The managers involved were useless and couldn't realise that 'urgent' doesn't mean second class post or 'being too busy to call back'.

I wrote to the Chairman of Citibank in the UK and complained about it all, while praising by name the Indian girl. Suggested the two dimwit managers involved should have a written warning, but I doubt that happened.

They did give me 250 for my trouble, though...