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G&T ice n slice
10th Jan 2014, 16:57
Are a complete pain in the whatever, all they do is lie around and gather dust.

I am hiring a skip and reducing it all to 1 chair, 1 table, 1 bed, 1 of each plate, fork,knife,spoon, glass, mug for tea/coffee.

I will however retain as many teaspoons as I can lay my hands on.

Gawd how I hate housework

500N
10th Jan 2014, 17:09
Agree.

Might have a big throw out this year.

SpringHeeledJack
10th Jan 2014, 17:28
It's strange how 'we' collect stuff above and beyond our needs, the female of the species being the worst offender :suspect: I have had major clear-outs several times over the last decade and it has always been both releasing and painful in equal measure. Stuff that meant something, or was useful often became surplus to requirements, yet other items are too precious to go (for whatever reason).

I have done a few house clearances in the past and to have done that with stuff that means nothing personally was enlightening and frustrating, so much crap bought, collected and ultimately thrown away. So much replication, it beggars belief. There's something to be said for minimalism.



SHJ

racedo
10th Jan 2014, 17:33
Think I heard it summed up best by daughter of parents who had acuired so much stuff.

Wanting to hold onto everything when they moved to a new place in advancing years she just said "When you are gone it gets dumped, don't hold onto it for me as I don't want it", sounds harsh but she honest.

G-CPTN
10th Jan 2014, 18:25
When you are gone it gets dumped
How true!

However . . .

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 18:27
SHJ wrote:

It's strange how 'we' collect stuff above and beyond our needs,

I'm guilty of that. With Books. I have thousands of books either in print or e-book format. Many of which I haven't read. Yet I continue to buy even more.

I'M OUTTA CONTROL... with books. :}:E

tony draper
10th Jan 2014, 18:44
Never throw anything out := within twenty four hours or sometimes sooner you will find you have a sudden and urgent need for said flung out item,it's a universal law that is.
:uhoh:

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 18:56
And especially not books, Tony D. Caught the wife starting to collect some of my dust-ridden book in an attempt at "spring cleaning". When I asked her where she thought she was going to put them she said "In the trash. You read them anyway."

I then informed her, politely of course, that if my books wound up in the trash she would be shortly behind them.

Loose rivets
10th Jan 2014, 18:57
I've talked a lot about this since I sold my Essex home. I've spent about £12,000 on storage - and that's after 10 weeks of clearing, four auctions and dozens of trips to the local dump. Gosh, I wish ebay had been around then. Maybe it was, but I hadn't much awareness of how to dispose of things for a good price.

I look back now and it's a nightmare. It would have cost four-thousand six-hundred to ship the stuff to my door here, and the antiques would have been worth so much more. So many times I wish we could go back in time and do things right.

My container cube in an old theater is very, very depressing. Even after selling the huge oak sideboard, it didn't seem to have any more space. It was filled to a density that, if I'd put one more grain of sand in there it would have gravitationally collapsed into a singularity. It could take a day to NOT find a box one just knows is in there.

Mind you, I come from a long line of hoarders. When I was first married, we collected stuff from relatives leaving the UK, relatives downsizing, and relatives deceased. :{ At one stage we had nine Hoovers. Throw them out???!!! No way. Look how beautifully they're built. Cast aluminium, and masses of thick Bakelite. The motors used to hit 40,000 rpm - and run smoothly. Keep them all. Keep the church organ. Always wanted one, ever since we used church halls for Boys Brigade and St John's first aid.

In fact, it would be hard to imagine an object I didn't have. Coins from India, pre war, with a little hole in the middle? Yep, box of them over there. 9mm film, with the hole in the middle? Yep, Felix the cat, third draw down. Microscope? Yep. Laboratory scales in a fine mahogany and glass case? Yep, one downstairs and one upstairs. A fine Wilton stair carpet over a hundred years old? Yep, attic, bay three.

I'll stop there because that carpet is a marker in my life. As the auction houses carried the stuff out, I said to one guy, 'That carpet looks like new. It's about 120 years old, and the colours have not faded. Don't put that with the tat.'

They put it with the tat. It fetched two quid and when I asked where the hollow triangular section rods were, they said, 'Oh, we put those with the carpet.' That was going in my dream home, but now I rather think my cardboard box won't have a staircase. Maybe I can build one - I've still got most of my mother's woodworking tools.

Mechta
10th Jan 2014, 19:15
I put it down to not coming to terms with mass production and built-in obsolescence. If you have the ability to repair things, that make it ten times worse, as you just put stuff in a corner for when you get round to it...

Having parents who grew up through years of rationing didn't help either, as being surrounded by surplus stuff was the norm.

Now we have the internet, its finally possible to come to terms with the fact that treasures from the past are available at the click of a button, so you only need to get them when you really need/want them (Airfix Super Flight Deck anyone?).

Having said that, I would hate having to share a desert island with a 'feng shui' or 'throw it away, its broken' type.

Does anyone else here have to suffer the workplace madness they call 5 S's? The principle is fine, its the cretins they get to implement it and the mess they make of it that makes my blood boil.

500N
10th Jan 2014, 19:20
Tony

Have done that before so now I tend to box it and wait 6 months. The
turf it. The other thing is, to replace a lot of stuff now is a lot cheaper
than it was many years ago.

Re books, I still have my Psychology and other books from when
I did my degree 30 years ago - in boxes, packed ready to throw out
but I just couldn't come to do it. :rolleyes:

I am a hoarder because my parents threw stuff out when we came to Australia
and brought stuff that they should have thrown out.


"Having parents who grew up through years of rationing didn't help either, as being surrounded by surplus stuff was the norm."

+ 1

I reckon that is why my mum is a hoarder.

"I put it down to not coming to terms with mass production and built-in obsolescence. If you have the ability to repair things, that make it ten times worse, as you just put stuff in a corner for when you get round to it... "

Agree.
Like before Xmas, got my fishing stuff out, couple of old crap spinning reels of my brothers, flaky, aluminium, etc. Didn't throw them out. Went into local fishing shop the other day, same / similar sized well known named reels on clearance for $29.99. I should just turf the old reels.

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 19:23
500N:

Do NOT throw out those books. That is a warning. If you throw out books you'll suffer the pangs of hell for all of eternity. You'll burn you will!

500N
10th Jan 2014, 19:28
RGB

That is the last thing I thought I'd hear from you.

Do you know what a book is ?

I didn't know Neanderthals could read :O

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 19:30
I never said anything about reading books, 500N. I look at the pictures. If the book doesn't have any pictures in it then it gets tossed on the shelf never to be opened again. I mean, what good is a book without pictures? :}:}:}

My favorite book of all time, with lots and lots of pictures and intellectually challenging as well is: 'See Spot Run'. :ok:

ruddman
10th Jan 2014, 19:31
Already done it. My wife and I own next to nothing. No house. No car. About 12 cartons with some bedding, cooking stuff, books, PC etc. Guitar and amp. Golf clubs.


And that's it. And never felt better!!


I'm now living in Mexico with my wife for the next 6-9 months. Have already travelled around the US for a month or so. The wife works online. Covers our costs. In fact, can even save.


I've done it guys. I'm not even 40 and I've beaten the system. I've done it! I'm free. FREE!!


Er.....hey guys. I've gotta go. :( The wife wants me to do the dishes in our apartment, sweep the floors, put the clothes away, and tidy up.

Bye. :{

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 19:34
ruddman wrote:

I'm now living in Mexico with my wife for the next 6-9 months.

And with that in mind I hope y'all have really, really good life insurance. :eek:

500N
10th Jan 2014, 19:35
RGB

I had a good laugh at Xmas with a mate, I mentioned you and suggested
you were like Clint Eastwood in Heartbreak Hill, "should be locked up and
the key thrown away" :O

(I have a good book for you to read. The Crossroads, Mark Donaldson, VC from the SAS. His story and life from go to being awarded the VC and on from then with the next couple of tours to Afghanistan.)

ruddman
10th Jan 2014, 19:40
RGB?


I only needed it when travelling through the US....:hmm:

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 19:58
ruddman:

Why, did you travel through New Jersey? There you'd certainly need lots and lots of life insurance. :}

ruddman
10th Jan 2014, 20:05
I travelled through LA - Union station at one point. Interesting! And around NY. State and City. And dined at a nice Brazilian restaurant in Newark. Also an interesting place.

What was REALLY interesting was the Brazilian women dancing at the restaurant for entertainment. In typical skimpy Brazilian attire. Thong and all.

First thing I thought when I saw her was that I've been married 12 years and finally its happened. I've fallen in love! ;)

One Outsider
10th Jan 2014, 20:14
George Carlin had something to say about it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvgN5gCuLac

waco
10th Jan 2014, 20:28
.............dont take my books away........Thats my retirement plan........
Mind you finding the money to pay for the electricity bill could be a problem. Perhaps it will be daytime reading only?

Dushan
10th Jan 2014, 20:42
I have thousands of books either in print or e-book format. Many of which I haven't read. Yet I continue to buy even more.

I'M OUTTA CONTROL... with books. :}:E

Me too. Buy a lot, haven't read a whole lot yet. As soon as I am done with Internet I'll start on the books. I think I have a few more web pages; almost done.

er340790
10th Jan 2014, 21:05
I'm now living in Mexico with my wife for the next 6-9 months.

Is there something you haven't told her???????????????? :eek:

Going to replace her with a Mexican?????????????? :} :} :}

G&T ice n slice
10th Jan 2014, 21:06
Bruddy Herr, I just cleared the area right at the farthest corner from the home-office door.

I just found the IBM PC-AT with the 20MB HD and 512KB Ram with extended to 640KB and with the Math-Co-Processor. And it's got the propper screen with green writing and a flashing cursor.

Anyone got a DOS manual?

ruddman
10th Jan 2014, 21:12
That's 6 TO 9 months. Not 69 months. :ok:


From a movie. Lol. Mexican girls are smokin hot though. Came through customs at cancun a few weeks back. Attractive - hot - young mexican girl selling tours etc asks me about a cab and so on. I tell her my wife is over there already arranging it.

She looks over to her then back at me then over to my wife again and says "is that your wife"? I said yes then she looks at me with a smile and says she is a very lucky women. :D

What can I say? Indeed she is. :ok:

radeng
10th Jan 2014, 22:38
Books. I sit here in the dining room surrounded by about 1500 non fiction books. I look at replacement prices on Abe books and find that some 50 of the titles easily read even with my eyesight amount to over £3000..... There's another 4,000 books in other rooms.....

I need to have a note put in my will so that the executors take due note - and that those railway books which are worth a lot and are going to preserved railways that are charities are taken as donations against inheritance tax. Although the amount of notice the nieces and nephews are paying us, I'm not sure they are going to get anything anyway!

Fox3WheresMyBanana
10th Jan 2014, 22:48
Stuff gets boxed for a move. If nothing comes out of a box for two house moves, I bin the box.
I have changed address, on average, yearly throughout my life. So, for all you normal people; if you haven't used something in two years, bin it.

Pinky the pilot
10th Jan 2014, 23:15
I'M OUTTA CONTROL... with books.

Likewise. And nobody but nobody even suggests that they should be turfed out!:=

meadowrun
10th Jan 2014, 23:26
Have done a major clean-up recently and did chuck out some books but only paperbacks that had been read and were not worthy of a re-read. Paper is a wonderful object but far too heavy. What is left of the books, mostly hardbacks, fills an entire bookcase..

Mum has always been an artist and during the war had a great deal of trouble getting paper to draw and paint on. After the war she discovered a drawer not previously investigated and found reams and reams of it her father had been hoarding. She was very displeased.

By the way, does anyone want about 6,000 page protectors?

Loose rivets
11th Jan 2014, 03:16
Mmmm . . . talking of meltdowns. During the war, they couldn't get enough paper to do vital equations on. And that was at Los Alamos. :ooh:

Richard Feynman used to do his squiggles on napkins in a topless bar.


I have a lot of psychology books. Every so often my professor son is given the task of disposing of certain required reading. Some of the books are HUGE, however they do have interesting pictures in them.

I don't see much of him, but the other day he came round and said a couple of words to me. I did not understand either of them.:uhoh:

John Hill
11th Jan 2014, 04:18
I started getting a hobby workshop together for my retirement and at a quick count today I see that I have five lathes!:}

racedo
11th Jan 2014, 04:25
Do NOT throw out those books. That is a warning. If you throw out books you'll suffer the pangs of hell for all of eternity. You'll burn you will!

Years ago in UK a guy started up taking some books from charities that were given them. They resorted and those of value they sell on ebay / amazon etc or those like the 10,000 50 shades are just pulped for packaging. Called World of Books.

racedo
11th Jan 2014, 04:28
First thing I thought when I saw her was that I've been married 12 years and finally its happened. I've fallen in love! http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif

You mean in LUST.

BlueDiamond
11th Jan 2014, 05:35
I then informed her, politely of course, that if my books wound up in the trash she would be shortly behind them.
I can understand that. :) It is beyond me to throw out/give away books; they are old and new friends to be loved and kept safe. There is nothing better than discovering an old book you haven't read for some time and indulging in the coffee/armchair/cat-on-lap routine while you renew your acquaintance with said book. :ok:

The only books I give away are those I have bought as gifts for people, and even then they have to prise them from my unwilling fingers ... :(

500N
11th Jan 2014, 05:49
"I have a lot of psychology books. Every so often my professor son is given the task of disposing of certain required reading. Some of the books are HUGE, however they do have interesting pictures in them. "

Every single one of my Psychology books is large or huge.

And yes, they do have some interesting pictures in them !

ExSp33db1rd
11th Jan 2014, 06:11
............I see that I have five lathes!We have 8 vacuum cleaners, and at last count over 100 things on the end of long handles - brooms, mops,brushes, rakes etc. rarely used ( at least by me)

Boxes packed and shipped from UK in 1997 - not even opened yet and taking up space in the garage so that both cars have to be left out in the Midday Sun Antiopdean under the Ozone Hole, which is damaging their paint.

Madness.

Krystal n chips
11th Jan 2014, 06:49
" I am hiring a skip and reducing it all to 1 chair, 1 table, 1 bed, 1 of each plate, fork,knife,spoon, glass, mug for tea/coffee"

Whilst minimalism is now rather passé , I am sure the Party will be delighted with your noble acts of self-sacrifice in order, presumably, to not allow material possessions to take priority over the ultimate goal.

However, they may be somewhat annoyed to learn you did not flog the lot off on ee by gum bay and swell the Party coffers thereafter.

It's little oversights like this that could arrest your progress to the upper echelons so one is only offering this perception, and retrospective advice, with yourself in mind.

That said, as a Guardian reader, I can only commend your stance on re-cycling of course. This support may cause a few palpitations on your part of course.

How's the revisionist review of the current Statute Book progressing....just out of interest ?

SpringHeeledJack
11th Jan 2014, 07:07
Boxes packed and shipped from UK in 1997 - not even opened yet and taking up space in the garage so that both cars have to be left out in the Midday Sun Antiopdean under the Ozone Hole, which is damaging their paint.

It is a sort of madness, but as such is very pernicious in it's ability to remain. It is said that our possessions are an outward reflection of our inner, every area has a significance. Why not haul those boxes out of the garage and open them up to shed light on the contents ?



SHJ

tony draper
11th Jan 2014, 07:33
Mr Hill,many years ago walking past the local junk shop(a sort of antique shop for poor folks) when in the dusty shop window one's eye fell upon the most beautiful object I had ever seen in my life,towit one watchmakers lathe,I do not have the words to describe the perfection of this object so will post a photographic of a similar one(the one in the junk shop was better)
Now I actually have no use for such a lathe,I do not know how to make watches,but I wanted it just to sit and look upon it.
Alas I had to be somewhere and did not have the thirty quid upon me that was the buying price,when I returned from doing the business in hand with funds it was gone,sold! obviously some other shedite had walked past and been struck
One shall regret this loss for the rest of me life.:(
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/Lathe.jpg (http://s11.photobucket.com/user/Deaddogbay/media/Lathe.jpg.html)

John Hill
11th Jan 2014, 08:05
Now you have me regretting that I never walked past that shop!

Of course if I want to feast my eyes on beautiful machines I could drive about 2 miles to this little museum..
http://lynnwoodworkmuseum.org/dis_img/big_1.jpg
Home :: The Lynn Woodwork Museum (http://lynnwoodworkmuseum.org/index.php)

...where I can view the Museum'ss great collection of early treadle operated lathes dating from the 1820's including six Holtzappfel Ornamental Turning Lathes, also Ornamental Lathes by Evans , Gill and Davies.

Not one but SIX Holtzappfel Ornamental Turning Lathes!
http://www.ornamentalturning.co.uk/index.1.jpg

Unfortunately my collection is not quite in that category consisting of a modern Chinese 12x36 engine late, a Grayson lathe about 6 inch and dating from 1950 or so, a very nice Drummond 3 1/2" from 1908, a tiny 2" Flexispeed lathe from 1960 or so and an even smaller Adept model makers lathe c1950. The Chinese lathe was bought new and all the others have been restored from much neglected machines or derelict bits and pieces

Tankertrashnav
11th Jan 2014, 08:28
I have changed address, on average, yearly throughout my life. So, for all you normal people; if you haven't used something in two years, bin it.


And two years and one week after the move you suddenly have an urgent need for something that was in the box!

G&T ice n slice
11th Jan 2014, 08:34
How's the revisionist review of the current Statute Book progressing....just out of interest ?

Slowly...

I bet other megalomaniac future world rulers didn't get bogged down with the humdrum, such as housework, doing tax returns, organising insurance blah blah blah. Especially not bruddy housework.

Never mind the agruments about the right colours of the uniforms:(

Sheesh.

probes
11th Jan 2014, 10:18
a complete pain in the whatever, all they do is lie around and gather dust.
actually Mr. D is not totally right - you'll need what you've thrown away immediately - like the almost-empty marker I threw into the oven yesterday and right when it had caught fire I needed something to mark the boxes for stuff 'we might not need in the near future, but who knows...' :sad:

SawMan
11th Jan 2014, 11:59
I've adopted a "One Year Rule" where if I cannot see certainty in making use of it within one year I either don't get it or it goes away. Here in the US there's an online group called "Freecycle" where you can offer what you have in excess or ask for needed items, but it all has to be free. No trades, no cash, no barters- just someone in need getting what they need and you not having to take things to the dump. You can also find charities who will often do pick-ups from your home or storage unit, and that can have tax advantages. There's also "Craigslist" which has a "free" section for those things that do not sell.

I spent half my life being 'portable' because of my career choice in construction. If I wanted the best jobs, it required that I relocate for the months or years they kept me busy. I could place all of my needed possessions in my full-sized van and I never really missed anything. But I've got the hoarding gene in me so my last move took 4 van loads! Funny thing is that I'm still not better off or happier than when it was just one :confused:

Hoarding can have many causes. My Mom grew up with a very poor family in the Depression. She recounts how during those years she never had more than two dresses and one pair of shoes, and hunger was constant. She's now filled 2 bedrooms with clothes and shoes- I guess it makes her feel good to know that she won't ever have "nothing to wear". Her cupboards are stuffed to overfilling too. She also gives what little she can afford to charities, remembering those days in the depression where if it hadn't been for others helping out she would not have had anything at all :ok:

If you've got a hoarding problem, then do everyone a favor- give what you don't need or use to someone who is struggling- you really don't have to look far to find people like that. It will mean the world to them and maybe they too will remember later on when they have something to give themselves :cool: And when you're cleaning out, be ruthless or you'll end up with the same amount of stuff you started with! It's time for me to reassess my own 'hoard' and make some space. I'll never get back to being as "portable" as I once was, but I'll never forget that equal happiness is possible with much less than I have now.

reynoldsno1
13th Jan 2014, 01:10
I'M OUTTA CONTROL... with books
My name is Reynolds ...
... and I am a bibliophile.

It's enough to make you turn to drink

Loose rivets
13th Jan 2014, 01:28
and at last count over 100 things on the end of long handles

That, for some unknown reason, had me in fits.:}

Tony, if I had one of those lathes I'd make a Loose rivets watch. Beautiful, isn't it?

And John, any chance of a picture or two of the smaller lathes?


My mate back home has lots of lathes. He buys one every time the ones he's got will not fulfill his needs. He seems to buy from fantastic sales and somehow, I have no idea how, gets them installed in his garden shed without help. One day a milling machine turned up. 80 quid, and weighing in at 800 pounds. He got it home and installed by himself.

John Hill
13th Jan 2014, 02:22
Sure thing..

The Grayson lathe..

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8260/8675101356_54faa35031.jpg

The little Flexispeed
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5511/11443733323_1435441c96.jpg

Drummond, c1908
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5015/5579100166_4624004868.jpg

FullOppositeRudder
13th Jan 2014, 03:57
Works of art - each one of them

Thanks for sharing :ok:

Loose rivets
13th Jan 2014, 04:12
Lovely collection. Thanks indeed, for posting.

Like most things I say these days, I've told it before, but one day I bought a Hillman Minx with a jiggered gearbox. 12 quid. In 40 mins I'd got the engine on the garage floor and in under an hour the gearbox lay open. A shaft less than a foot long was burned and BENT on a bearing point. The bend wasn't much, and I reasoned that if the main part of the shaft ran true, the reverse gear teeth could ride in and out as the gears were straight cut.

I kid you not, I took a tailstock end to a grindstone and offset the point by about . . . erm, that much. I put it in the lathe and bewilderingly, the main part of the shaft ran as near as dammit, true. I took it to an engineering company next to the pub and they built up the burned surface with the exciting new gas welding thingie they'd invested in. It cost me a pint. I then turned this surface and put on a new bearing. Plenty of bearing fit. It ran perfectly in all forward gears, and wow-wow-wow'd a little in reverse. Used the car for shopping and the like for years.

You had to grow up in post-war years to do stuff like that. Or I suppose, not have two beans to rub together. Or both.

John Hill
13th Jan 2014, 04:18
Our farm had a Buick from about 1922 which had been converted to a truck and was frequently grossly abused and overloaded. One day, miles from the house with a full load of hay bales on the back something (a key maybe?) broke in the rear axle. My father, who was never known for excessive mechanical finesse, poked the tine of a pitchfork in the hole and wiggled it back and forth until it broke. The 'truck' operated like that for another 20 years or so.

The young lads on my air force training course had a number of cars between us that were many years past their use by date. One was a 4 cylinder Plymouth (c1928?) which ran a big end bearing and they continued to drive it back to base and almost got there before the bearing broke and the crank bashed the con rod out the side of the engine casting. One of our practical colleges took out the loose bits of metal and pushed the piston up to the top then took the connecting rod off the 'opposite' cylinder and left that piston stuck in its bore too. The motor ran quite smoothly on just two cylinders and the car was still capable of 30+ mph, perfectly adequate for in-town running about.:)

racedo
13th Jan 2014, 13:41
Plan is to get littlies involved in getting cars to run and how to fix them, not the new ones where being a computer programmer is required but the old ones so they understand what makes them run and how to fix them.

Never know when they will use but also gives them an appreciation of all things engineering.

SWMBO was away weekend and I came out of house alledgedly without keys, told them we locked out but could use ladder over 6 foot wall in garage but I couldn't climb, got littlie #2 up and was too high, so came back down, #1 up decides same so #2 went back up and over and opens gate. Put ladder to window and told #1 he had to go up it and in.......normally v cautious one, up and inside in a flash and opened front door. Then we walked to the shops with kids grinning ear to ear. Memo to self, bloody big lock required on ladders.

Capetonian
13th Jan 2014, 13:52
I am in the process of de-cluttering prior to a move. Yesterday, with regret, put about 100 books into the recycling bin. I went there with about 200, but there were some that at the final moment I couldn't abandon, so they came back.
Today, a friend who runs a charity bookshop said they can use some. She also mentioned cookery books, and of course I threw away some yesterday. Murphy's law.

It is very liberating. Got rid of things that we might one day manage to get fixed, but in reality that wasn't going to happen. Old telephones, wired and cordless, landline and cellphones. Converters and extensions for everywhere from Azerbaijan to Zambia, telephone plugs from Aruba to Zanzibar, voltage converters, SCART cables, old 12" turntables (but can't bear to throw the records away, two 'Walkman' players, a hifi that we'll never use, tape deck.

Now trying to get SWMBO to agree to throwing away a few things every week to make it a gradual process. It's very liberating.

Molemot
13th Jan 2014, 14:04
Last time I moved, my plan involved a Luton Transit van. If it wouldn't go in there, it wasn't going!! First layer was boxes full of books...then my late father's massive wooden workbench and all the tools...after that the domestic stuff. Ended up with the transit filled to the roof...but everything else went to the tip. Now I have one wall full of books and a very well equipped workshop....not going to get bored, that's for sure!

rgbrock1
13th Jan 2014, 15:19
Capetonian wrote:

Yesterday, with regret, put about 100 books into the recycling bin.

You threw books into the recycle bin? :eek::eek::eek:

You do realize you're going straight to hell for that, don't you? :}:E

Limeygal
13th Jan 2014, 19:23
BOOKS SHOULD NEVER BE BINNED, EVER.

Cleared out all my crap last year. Found boxes in the attic from our move 10 years ago. Binned the lot. Clothes went to the charity shop-if I haven't worn it in a year, I don't need it. I don't miss any of it.

G&T ice n slice
13th Jan 2014, 20:02
You threw books into the recycle bin?

Trust no Holy books(*1) otherwise you run the risk of a Whatfa(*2)

(*1) Eg books that are Holy to the Jedi, or the Trekkies (see Haynes USS Enterprise Manual (http://www.haynes.co.uk/enterprise/enterprise_downloads.htm))

(*2) Whatfa - as in "I'll give you what for"

Blacksheep
14th Jan 2014, 07:21
I never send anything to the charity shop. If Missus goes to the charity shop to dispose of an item she comes home with two items that other people had disposed of. :rolleyes:

The worst thing is getting rid of old clothes. Everything is "for so-n-so" back in Malaysia. Our next trip will involve several suitcases and an excess baggage charge that makes the ticket price an insignificant contribution to the cost of travel. :(

Capetonian
14th Jan 2014, 08:00
We can't throw old clothes or shoes away at the Europe end, they all have to be saved to be taken to ZA. The result is as above, I was once asked for €640 for excess baggage after an airline had kindly promised us an extra 10kg per person as we were taking old clothes to give to a charity in CPT. Unfortunately when we got to the airport the person who had made the promise had not made a note of it and could not be contacted, so after a most unpleasant scene involving an incompetent moron at the check in counter and a foul mouthed lying harpie of a supervisor, we left the stuff behind. Since then, I don't bother (nor do I fly on that airline).

SawMan
14th Jan 2014, 10:30
One never throws books away if they are readable- that's a cardinal sin which will land you in whatever place you're hoping to avoid after death, and when your friends like me find out we will never speak to you again :=

Even if the books are something you are not interested in, somebody else was or the publisher would have never given them the go-ahead. Every book is somebody's friend whom they haven't met yet and by throwing them away you've cost them a friend :ugh:

Sadly, books (the real kind and not decrypted one's and zero's appearing on a screen) are becoming passe', and the art and pleasure of reading them is becoming extinct. Us bibliophiles are the keepers of that flame. Books have immeasurable value. Many years back my two younger friends next door were an internet gamer and a television addict. Late one afternoon the power went out. I noticed because the stereo died (I had it playing low in the background). When I figured that out I turned the battery radio on and went back to reading, thinking of the profound suffering that must be happening next door. Looking at my battery-powered clock I muttered "three minutes" and went back to my reading. Sure enough, just over three minutes later the cell phone rings and my young friend asks how I'm faring with the power out. Lying a bit I said "Oh, I didn't notice. My battery radio and my book are still working fine and if it gets dark I'll just light the kerosene lamp and keep going." :E

Which I did as it got dark and the power hadn't yet been restored. I hope they didn't hear my constant chuckling at their self-made distress. The book was my second copy of "Pursuit" by Ludovic Kennedy purchased used from a charity thrift shop. My first used copy was well-beaten when I got it and had worn out with my insatiable re-reading of it. Now would you have denied me the chance to show youngsters that us old fogeys had tricks far better than their "hi-tech' toys" by throwing some book away? Old magazines maybe- but real books never.

Back on topic, when someone asks me what I'm going to do with "all that stuff" I reply "It isn't stuff, it's a collection!" and that takes the wind out of their sails :D I really do need to get rid of some of those 'collections' though!

Capetonian
14th Jan 2014, 10:39
Throughout my adult life I have had an absolute aversion to throwing books away. A charity I work for does book sales, but they no longer have storage space for the books that have been donated and they are being donated at about ten times the rate at which they are being sold.

I have done 'giveaway' sales just to increase awareness of the charity and even when we do those we've always ended up with more books than we started with. People come with ten books and leave with two or three. Every now and then I do a 'sort' and throw away books that are are dirty (I mean as in physical appearance, not content), torn, or simply of no use, for example Windows 95 guide. It hardly helps.

I have tried giving them to bookshops to give away, they also are out of space. We can't take them to ZA or anywhere for that matter for weight reasons. So throwing them away is the final solution. Very sad.

Blacksheep
14th Jan 2014, 12:26
It having been recommended as essential reading for a destroyer researcher, I recently bought a used copy of Malalieu's "A Very Ordinary Seaman" on the Big Rainforest River. Its been out of print for about thirty years, but really good books circulate for as long as there are people to read them.

I'm glad I did. As the book reaches the climactic battle between the two British and three German destroyers it becomes apparent to me that Malalieu's fictional destroyer is in fact HMS Forester - the very ship that is the subject of my interest*. His description of the scrap is supposedly fiction [it was published in 1944] but is clearly a first-hand account of a very real event with which I am familiar. The account is much better then the dry facts presented in Admiralty records: nothing brings an event to life as well as a book written by a true word-smith.

[* My father served in Forester]

Limeygal
14th Jan 2014, 12:45
Capetonian-our local library system takes books from the public for their bi-annual book sale. They raise money for the library that way. Perhaps your local library has such a scheme?

ricardian
14th Jan 2014, 18:00
Our mobile library van (http://readerinresidenceorkneylibrary.********.co.uk/2012/11/orkney-mobile-library-dawn-to-dusk.html) calls once a month thus providing a valuable service to those of us unable or unwilling to take the ferry to and from Kirkwall (2 hours each way). If we have any of our own books that we no longer require the librarian is delighted to accept them into Kirkwall library's (http://www.orkneylibrary.org.uk/html/mobiles.htm) stock.

ExSp33db1rd
14th Jan 2014, 20:13
Malalieu's "A Very Ordinary Seaman" "Curly" Mallalieu was a family friend, and "somewhere" I have a signed copy from the first publication that my parents gave me for my birthday one year, must try to find it and read it again.

Seem to recall that he called the fictional ships HMS Marsden and HMS Meltham, (?) him being Labour M.P. for Huddersfield for many years after the War.

He treated me to tea on the Terrace of the House of Commons once.

meadowrun
14th Jan 2014, 22:05
It was once said by someone that your average paperback book will turn into dust in 75 years due to the poor paper quality.

I have one from my teenage years as a control sample - Steal This Book - by Abby Hoffman - still in good nick after about 45 years and No, I did not nick it.

So far, that someone didn't know what he was talking about and is probably dust himself now.

G-CPTN
14th Jan 2014, 22:29
paperback book will turn into dust in 75 years due to the poor paper quality.
Paper produced for books printed during the War (WWII) was very poor quality (lots of wood fibres visible) and was highly acidic I believe - though whether that adversely affects longevity I cannot tell. Stocks of that paper continued to be used for some books up to ten years after the end of the War.

ChristiaanJ
14th Jan 2014, 23:06
G&T,
Still have a DOS manual, a fair amount of 5 1/4 inch floppies, BASIC disks and manual, various games, and probably other stuff.
If you feel tempted to wake up that AT, you can have the stuff for the shipping costs.
CJ

G&T ice n slice
15th Jan 2014, 09:39
Thanks for the offer, but I was joking... sadly I did actually get rid of that one when i moved house 10 or so years ago.

Meanwhile, I have managed to excavate very nearly to the bottom right hand corner of the office, finding in the process an unopened box of chocolates with "sell by" date of 17/08/06. So they're good for another couple of years until 2017.

SpringHeeledJack
15th Jan 2014, 10:50
10 years or so ago I took on a house clearing for a still resident old man who had been a hoarder, much of it during the 70's and 80's with the threat of imminent Russian advance just 40kms away. Anyway a huge collection of perhaps 'useful one day' items were sorted through (I wish that eBay had been properly around then) and finally his bunker where supplies were kept to sustain him should the worst have happened. Of the remaining food supplies that was time stamped was a Tetrapak of tomato puree with the 'use by' date of 1984, so it had an 18 year overrun. It was opened, and tested. It was a bit sour, but usable had one been out of options :uhoh:


SHJ