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V2-OMG!
5th Jan 2014, 02:50
Today, I witnessed something I haven't seen in a long time: two guys working on a car.

The car was an early seventies Dodge.

Being the natural busy-body, I had to walk over and take a closer look. When I voiced my observation (the title of this thread) I was privy to a livey tirade about cars (then) vs. cars (now). The guys obviously possessed more affection for the former because today's cars are too complicated for a "Saturday morning mechanic."

Come to think of it, whenever I take my vehicle to the dealer for service, it no longer involves a simple discussion with a "mechanic." I am referred to umpteen "technical specialists," then presented with a hum-dinger of a bill.

I don't profess to be a "technical specialist" -- not even a "mechanic," but was wondering how different things are under the hood, then vs. now.

So, I found a photo of a seventies Dodge Duster vs. one of my latest rides, a 2011 Infiniti. Both possess a V6 engine.

Even to this untrained eye, the Infiniti looks daunting.
Stark.
Secretive.
Futuristic.

Comments? Observations? Does anyone here actually understand their later-model car enough to even attempt some basic maintenance?

1970 Dodge Duster......
http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL1942/12014112/24374556/408498583.jpg

2010 Infiniti......
http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL1942/12014112/24374556/408498584.jpg

Matari
5th Jan 2014, 02:59
That Duster looks like a slant six, no?

I can name at least fifteen components under the old Dodge hood. Windshield wiper motor, battery, air filter, radiator, etc.

Under the Infiniti hood, I think I can spot a Cappuccino machine, an iPod and a home mortgage application.

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 03:05
First of all the Dodge, if it is a Dodge, is a straight 4, not a V6. If you removed then fbncy over in he Infiniti, you old find a hornet's net f cures and sensors. Today's cars Re computer controlled and relay on a lot of sensors and electrically controlled valves and solenoids to operate properly. There is no more "it's just a screw adjustment" kind of fix. When something goes it is usually a sensor or an electronic component. You also need a sophisticated computer o hook up,into the cr's fi gnostic system to determine what's wrong. Luckily there is an app for that.

John Hill
5th Jan 2014, 03:15
First of all the Dodge, if it is a Dodge, is a straight 4, not a V6.

It is a 6. If one looks closely you can see 3 exhaust ports visible in front of the aircleaner.

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 03:15
On better look, a slant six. Some of the components we don't see welll are the alternator, and there would be a coil with a distributor with high tension wires going to the plugs. On today's cars each plug has its own coil with low voltage wire going to it. The DPRK timing being controlled by a computer an based on the input from a camshaft position sensor.

John Hill
5th Jan 2014, 03:18
Slant or not, it is still a 6.

TWT
5th Jan 2014, 03:27
DPRK timing

Think you're on the wrong thread :p

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 03:34
Think you're on the wrong thread :p

LOL, my iPad must have seen John Hill's response and auto inserted DPRK.

crippen
5th Jan 2014, 04:07
but underneath all that plastic and computer crap,there is still the same basic engine to be repaired and serviced.:p

meadowrun
5th Jan 2014, 04:13
Tis' all true. Now in addition to all looking the same, they are nightmares to work on unless you have near the computing capabilities of the NSA.

My Peugeot 404 (1964 - owned in 1992) blew the fuel pump. Replaced with re-manufactured one in 20 minutes. No gasket..... no problem, used RTV732. Later re-built the old fuel pump again in a couple of lazy hours. (Apparently that car would sell today in Cuba for $100,000.).

Last bike had mtce manual an inch thick, separate electronics mtce manual was three inches thick.

llondel
5th Jan 2014, 04:18
I was thinking that too, the plastic trim just hides the rust better as it ages. Plus it's something else that takes time to remove for servicing, so the mechanic can charge a bit more.

There might not even be a coil for the ignition now, at least not in the same sense as the old interpretation. It's all gone solid state, so the distributor isn't even needed.

I can identify the dipstick for the oil level on the Infiniti (on some cars, it's associated with the nut that holds the steering wheel).

rh200
5th Jan 2014, 04:50
but underneath all that plastic and computer crap,there is still the same basic engine to be repaired and serviced.

Exactly right, all the extra stuff is in effect to make it more efficient.

Yes the "Iron" has been refined in composition and design, but its still the same basic [email protected]

blue up
5th Jan 2014, 07:46
I had to change a head gasket yesterday. That's 20 minutes of my life I'll never get back! (although 5 minutes was for drinking tea)

http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j279/foggythomas/whitewheels1.jpg

I then spent nearly 2 hours trying (unsuccessfully) to change a light bulb in a Ford Focus. Wonder how easy a Focus head gasket would be to change?

Progress?

UniFoxOs
5th Jan 2014, 07:51
I always said I wouldn't run current cars when I retired for this reason, so I now have two 1970's vehicles, easy to maintain and reliable, and also cheap to run - no road tax and cheap insurance.

Of course the downside is that they are not that luxurious or fuel-efficient, but I don't do a lot of miles in them - 5000 a year would cover both. SWMBO's Mondeo, on the other hand, is comfortable, with all mod cons - heated screens, climate control etc., and is much cheaper on fuel than either of mine, doing 12-15000 a year on LPG.

So far I have managed to service her modern cars myself - oil, oil filter, air and fuel filters being easily replaceable, although at the cost of removing odd covers and bruising your knuckles and wrists to get at some of the bits. I have managed to change cambelts and "serpentine" belts (fan-belts to us wrinklies) and located problems with a cheap OBDII adaptor, a laptop, and some downloaded software.

sitigeltfel
5th Jan 2014, 07:54
I then spent nearly 2 hours trying (unsuccessfully) to change a light bulb in a Ford Focus.

Traffic laws here don't seem to keep up with technology. We are still required to carry spare bulbs despite many cars now needing a trip to a garage to change them.
Anyone poking their fingers around the circuitry feeding HID xenon lights could be in for a shock......literally.

Lon More
5th Jan 2014, 07:58
I had a Renault Avantime for a couple of years, great, comfortable car for long distances.
Biggest drawback was the Nissan engine. Te timing belt needed changing at 50000 K , which was an engine out job. Whilst that was out, change the water pump, all 6 coils and plugs etc etc etc. Not much change going to be left from 7000 so I sold it. In contrast, most of my 63 Chevy pick-up can be fixed with a couple of hammers and a 9/16 AF spanner

OFSO
5th Jan 2014, 08:13
What are "sparking plugs" ? Haven't had them in any car I've owned since the 1990's.

Seriously my local dealer's mechanics hardly look at the car to see if there are any problems. They just plug it in and read the VDU screen.

Re changing the light bulb - my Mondeo needs a trip to the dealer to do this. OTOH my wife's UK car has easily accessable bulbs - but when I tried to change an orange 12v turn indicator bulb over Christmas I couldn't find anywhere selling them !

Do owners with LED headlamps and tail lamps have to carry a spare bulb kit ?

John Hill
5th Jan 2014, 08:53
My wife bought a new Suzuki Baleno in 1997 and trouble was not long in coming in fact the rear hatch lock jammed after about 3 weeks. She drives it every day and since then nothing has gone wrong at all..:cool:

Tankertrashnav
5th Jan 2014, 09:10
The second time my wife's little Suzuki failed to start because its computer failed to recognise the chip in her ignition key and had to be reset (100 each time) I told her next time she was having a Morris Minor.

I already own the Swiss Army knife which is about all you need to work on one ;)

Metro man
5th Jan 2014, 09:21
Without a diagnostic computer and access to specialist tools there is very little you can do on a modern car. Back in the 1970s and 1980s we used to complain about how complicated Citroens were but today even a basic hatchback is beyond an average owners capability for much more than a simple oil change.

Get caught in a flood and you have a write off on your hands as the electronics will be beyond economic repair.

In the past I wouldn't have considered buying a new car due to depreciation, now that has changed. I would look at buying new with the longest warranty I could find and scrapping the car when it was out guarantee and I was facing a big bill.

These days a used car is a massive gamble as a new seven speed gearbox, ECU or ABS controller can easily set you back more than the cars worth.

A used car easily becomes a money pit as once you have committed to an expensive repair you are reluctant to scrap the car too soon and keep throwing good money after bad.

Capetonian
5th Jan 2014, 09:21
One of the reasons I stick to older cars is all of the above. The newest is 2006 and it is so highly automated and electronic that only the most basic operations can be done at home. Every time a warning light comes on I know we're looking at a couple of hundred notes. I can check the fluid levels and tyre pressures and looking at it I could probably replace the alternator and starter unit if I had to, but it would probably have to to be 'recalibrated' so even that might not be possible.

In the old days I did everything, including full engine overhaul, component replacement. Now, I've thrown away all but the most basic tools.

John Hill
5th Jan 2014, 09:35
Most of the faults in a modern car are poor electrical connections which the diagnostics will show as a faulty sensor or whatever. Of course changing the sensor reseats the plug on connector so everything is OK and just pay the money and drive away.

It is not difficult to read the diagnostic codes if you have a couple of clip leads and a LED, depending on the car of course, you also need a Haynes or equivalent DIY manual for your car. Clip on the leads to the diagnostic block which is probably near your right knee somewhere, turn on the key while holding your mouth just right and you will see a pattern of flashes on the LED. Consult your book and identify the faulty component then check the connections to it and 95% of the time that will be the issue. The laptop or diagnostic device just makes reading the flashes easier and no doubt give access to a lot of other stuff too.

603DX
5th Jan 2014, 11:35
The sea change in the feasibility of home mechanical tinkering for the average car owner probably occurred when ECUs began to take over critical functions. With the over-confidence of youth, and shortage of money, I once carried out head gasket replacements, decokes, big end replacements, overhead camshaft and rockers replacements, and renewals of pretty well all of the electrical components and braking systems. All without any help or advice from trained garage mechanics, just the aid of a relevant Haynes manual.

But now that cars are commonly just stylised computers on wheels, the rug has been well and truly tugged from under me, and none of these jobs are practicable. My Bavarian motor works vehicle is fuel injected, so no carburettor to fiddle with, doesn't have a throttle because complex variable valve timing has replaced it, and even the accelerator pedal is connected by a "fly-by-wire" system to the go-faster bits. "Dynamic stability control" occupies a space under the bonnet that I leave well alone, and probably wasn't dreamed about in the days when I used to get oil under my fingernails, and barked knuckles. The cocky confidence of my early life has been replaced by the wary resignation of more mature years, where fault-finding and rectification is concerned.

However, all is not lost! To my astonishment, compared with the chronic unreliability of those early examples of deliberately planned obsolescence that we were all saddled with, my current modern vehicle features previously unheard-of durability and near-100% reliability. So despite the happy fact that in retirement I can afford to have any problems dealt with by professionals who actually know what they are doing, the need for their services is absolutely minimal. Halleluiah! ;)

M.Mouse
5th Jan 2014, 11:51
603DX

Precisely the point. How selective our memories are. People talk fondly of replacing head gaskets, big ends and such like but all I remember is getting cold and dirty albeit with some job satisfaction when finished!

Can anybody tell me the last time the big ends needed replacing on a car built in the last 15 years or so? Or needed a new head gasket?

Admittedly when a modern car stops running or runs badly it is not a question of tediously examining the distributor cap for cracks or adjusting the points but it is still relatively simple given a cheap diagnostics unit now that OBD interfaces are standardised.

Personally I will stick with highly efficient, fast and reliable modern cars and those that wish can wallow in their rose tinted nostalgia longing for the days of spending their spare time repairing or adjusting the unreliable cars of yesterday.

Pretendorious
5th Jan 2014, 11:55
Just as a certain amount of knowledge was required to tinker with the cars of yesteryear, so is it required for the present. It is actually not that difficult, and in many ways easier, to troubleshoot or diagnose faults. All that is required is a laptop and an OBD-I/II interface. The associated software can all be obtained online. The real problems come when trying to replace electrical/electronic components as these often require initialization for them to work. Often the software required for this is kept on servers at the manufacturer and is only accessible via specifically approved computers that only approved dealers/shops have.

Cpt_Pugwash
5th Jan 2014, 13:07
"Can anybody tell me the last time the big ends needed replacing on a car built in the last 15 years or so?"

Actually, yes. The big ends went in my 03 Plate Mondeo about 18 months ago. Previous owners FSH proved to be a figment of his imagination. Cheaper in the end to fit full recon engine .

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 13:42
Point of order, please. What is a "big end" for us non-English, English speakers?

Fox3WheresMyBanana
5th Jan 2014, 13:46
http://raanz.org.nz/wiki/uploads/TM/tmfig057.png

Cpt_Pugwash
5th Jan 2014, 13:49
The pistons in an internal combustion engine are connected to the crankshaft by a connecting rod ( con-rod) . This has a bearing surface at each end, the big end at the crankshaft and the little end at the piston. Simples:ok:

Edit: F3 got there first. Well, a picture paints a thousand words.:ok:

M.Mouse
5th Jan 2014, 13:53
Actually, yes. The big ends went in my 03 Plate Mondeo about 18 months ago. Previous owners FSH proved to be a figment of his imagination. Cheaper in the end to fit full recon engine .

OK, I should have said apart from being damaged due to lack of oil changes/maintenance! If the damage was caused by lack of decent lubriscation then I am sure the rest of the engine would have been suspect too so a recon. engine would appear to have been a sound decision.

Point of order, please. What is a "big end" for us non-English, English speakers?

And to clarify fully when someone says I had to replace the "big ends" they are normally referring to the white metal shell bearings situated in the big end of the connecting rod and which sit between the connecting rod and the crankpin.

meadowrun
5th Jan 2014, 16:17
....The head bone connected to the neck bone, The neck bone connected tothe back bone, The back bone connected to the thigh bone, The thigh bone connected to the knee bone and the......

Sorry, couldn't resist.

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2014, 16:24
If those in Canadia and the USofA don't use the terms big end and little end, how do they differentiate which end is which?

Fox3WheresMyBanana
5th Jan 2014, 16:28
This is the end! ;)

Apocalypse Now Intro (The Doors - The End) - YouTube

SOPS
5th Jan 2014, 16:32
All I know, when I started driving I had a 1968 Holden. Drum brakes, no belts, no crumple zones, airbags?...driver assist aids?...?..?, I wonder now how we are all not dead, my 2013 Accord Euro sh$ts all over my first car, no I can't change the timing or the oil, but I could not care less.

Blacksheep
5th Jan 2014, 16:45
Back in '74 I changed a Hillman Hunter cylinder head gasket in a "Greasy Spoon" car park off the A1 near Doncaster and kept that car going until it was 15 years old.

We replaced that with a Honda Accord that I could have worked on, had I needed to: but I never did. Missus ran a conventional Honda Shuttle for 12 years and the only thing we changed apart from oil and tyres was the universal joints and the exhaust.

Wind on a few years and Missus's ECU controlled Daihatsu Terios went 9 years from new to selling it on without changing anything but the oil and tyres. It did fail to start one morning, but that was where a rat gnawed through some wiring and it was a simple fix.

My last car was a Honda CRV that gave similar service, so I've bought another one. Cars are certainly more complicated these days, but they seldom go wrong. (Japanese ones, anyhow).

flying lid
5th Jan 2014, 17:02
I miss the early 70's. Myself and most mates had our first cars back then, mine was a 59 Daimler Majestic 3.something litre straight 6.

Saturday afternoon was always "car fiddling with" day, usually entailing visits to local scrapyards with a selection of tools and a couple of quid. Garages - what were they ?.

Mate had an old mini, engine seized. We located a "donor" car, in a valley near Rivington, on the moors above Horwich. It was a cold but clear Saturday morning in January, The car was burned out, and wrecked after turning several times, had been there for weeks. Well several of us turned up, removed the engine / gearbox, dragged it up the moor a few hundred feet, wrapped it in old carpet and into the back of a North Western Gas Board ford transit !!!.

We fitted it the following week, and after a bit of fettling got it working. Who bothered about engine numbers back then !!!

I later traded in the Daimler, got 200 for it against a 1.8 litre Morris Marina http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/sleep.gifhttp://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/boohoo.gif:rolleyes: .

Grand old days, never to be repeated.

Lid

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 17:11
If those in Canadia and the USofA don't use the terms big end and little end, how do they differentiate which end is which?

Crankshaft bearings and piston bearings.

Cpt_Pugwash
5th Jan 2014, 17:39
How do they differentiate between the crankshaft (big end) bearings and the crankshaft main bearings?

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 17:50
Crankshaft main bearing (front and rear).

Loose rivets
5th Jan 2014, 17:58
Waddaya call the main bearings?


My Oldsmobile Silhouette problem never got solved. While looking for the cause of the slight missfire at tickover, I found a rodent had got trapped in the airbox and eaten some wiring. Sad thing was, the main computer was in there for cooling purposes.

I learned a lot in that series of sessions. How the signal is taken from the crank and sent to the electronics on the 3 IGN coils. Another signal is then sent to the computer. The cam position sensor sends another signal to the computer. The two are compared and melded with the air/fuel intakes before the output is sent to the injectors. All fairly straight forward - if you have a scope in yer hobby-shop.

I was having a continuing problem with the cam sensor tripping the master warning. Every hour or so, the light would come on. I'd reset everything and look again and again at the signal coming from that sensor. Never did it seem to miss a beat. The problem was, it was under the power steering pump. Long story short, I finally rolled up my sleeves and drained the reservoir Quite a long job and despite newspapers and rags over the new Serpentine belt, I still got the damn juice on it. It had to come out of a space I could just get my hands in - just to be washed properly.

The thing is, I was doing all this sure that this wasn't the fault. I'd even unwrapped the wiring again to check my work. Linking damaged wiring was something I'd got good at after the war. There were a lot of mice about and they liked cotton covered wires.

Oh, but wait! I've missed a bit. I was SO sure it wasn't that - after all, hadn't I driven round the neighborhood with headphones on, listening to all these signals? Never seemed to miss a beat and the cam one is so slow it's easy to tell. So, I CHANGED THE MAIN COMPUTER before getting greasy. (I am shouting a little bit:( )

There was the temptation to get a 'new' one anyway. If you break down because of this multi-function device, it's megga bucks AND the days it takes to get the new one to be programed to your VIN number. Plus, it then has to go through a marriage ceremony with your car's security system. It's nice to have one with you on long trips that's set to go. Remember, this device has the power output transistors to open the injectors - send OK signals back to the IGN control while working your coded key and allowing certain doors to open remotely. It sits there watching you, but has no awareness it is being attacked by mice!

Anyway, the old cam sensor was in my grasp and the castellated niches looked fine. The bloody thing was cracked.

Now here's another thing. A nice bloke on the internet - one who runs a company sorting faults others couldn't find - told me he takes continuous readings of such devices. Then he goes back to his office and looks at the waveforms very, very carefully. So, my headphones were not the answer after all.

The EGR issues I'd covered in another blog, but they were not an issue anymore. (9volts maximum to check those, by the way.) Now the light stayed out. Fine, but the faltering tick-over is still there. It was worse when I got back from summer in the UK, so perhaps it is sticky valves, or injectors or . . .


These were in the bucket, so . . .


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/PpruNe/PCMandmouse4.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/PpruNe/PCMandmouse4.jpg.html)


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/PpruNe/PCMandmouse7.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/PpruNe/PCMandmouse7.jpg.html)

Just couldn't take it with me. Good job, it'd be like texting while driving.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/PpruNe/CrankScope1.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/PpruNe/CrankScope1.jpg.html)

Not much room under that Power steering pump - also it was jammed into a casting. That's why I wanted to eliminate other things first. NO MORE TRANSVERSE ENGINES. NEVER, EVER!!!!!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/PpruNe/CrankScope2.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/PpruNe/CrankScope2.jpg.html)


Don't forget. 12v can kill an EGR

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/PpruNe/2012-03-19125203.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/PpruNe/2012-03-19125203.jpg.html)


The desk has been cleared for watch fettling, so much cleaner and the slightest hissy-fit is terminal, so one remains calm at all costs. Unusual for me.:rolleyes:

cockney steve
5th Jan 2014, 18:04
Well, I recently knocked the bottom-end out *on my 200 Volvo Turbo T4
(loved the kick in the pants when the Turbo set -to )
had a later , Mitsubishi-engined V40, which kept going into limp-mode...that's all "fly by wire", but car was another 200 quid gamble....A browse on the internet and a fiver for a code-read, saw the throttle-body being removed, dismantled and a large permanent-magnet being re-epoxied to the throttle-spindle....instant cure, car pased MOT first time and it does average31 mpg compared with the Turbo's 26...all in all, a good buy

full leather, winter pack, aircon, cruise, leccy windows all round, factory multi-CD/cassette/radio....blah blah..
Why would I want to buy something tat depreciates more in a year, than this cost, on the road.

Modern cars require a different approach to diagnostics and repair......with few exceptions, a car that's old enough to have major engine or transmission ills, is not worth rebuilt/recon. replacements
plenty of writeoffs and scrappers around, just bung in a secondhand unit.

Even stuff like a Catalytic converter or Turbocharger can be bought in good, serviceable condition, for a fraction of new list. a few years ago, i put a full stainless steel exhaust under a Rolls (6 silencers) Under 400, system was as new and car had had a shunt.

I have spent less than 1K a year on all motoring costs except fuel, for the last 30-odd years. currently there are very many that need a little bit of fettling, available for virtually scrap money ( both my volvos would scrap for ~150 each!)

John Hill
5th Jan 2014, 18:14
The bloody thing was cracked. Isnt it amazing how very rarely it really is a failure of any inscrutable black box! It is usually something physical that you can see once you find it.

My Ford, quite old now, 1999 Australian L6 engine, runs and idles smooth as silk but just occasionally it would stumble at idle which after a while became rough running and finally barely able to limp home. It had been to the experts half a dozen times and even expert experts with special equipment in a van came to town and plugged in to diagnose. They tested everything and started swapping in expensive electronic bits until I called a halt and demanded no more of that and that they start again from square one. Eventually someone thought of taking out one of the fuel injectors and noticed rust on the nozzle! Water in the fuel tank.:sad:

Loose rivets
5th Jan 2014, 20:38
A pal of mine used to build those supercars in Oz. An Alpha cut in half and a huge V8 stuck in the middle. They had ZF gearboxes.

After considerable difficulties, ZF dispatched a team - two or more - blokes to be the expert experts. They set about undoing a huge nut on the gearbox while I think it was on the bench. My pal watched.

After what seemed an age of struggling, he walked over and suggested the nut had a left hand thread. Long pregnant silence in German, and they undid it smoothly to the left.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
5th Jan 2014, 20:45
LR has a point. I have also experienced a

Long pregnant silence in German

and they are much scarier than a long pregnant silence in English ;)

Loose rivets
5th Jan 2014, 20:47
Well I'm blessed!! Mate's boss is at it again. I shall let him know.

Twin V8 Aussie supercar takes shape - motoring.com.au (http://www.motoring.com.au/news/2013/twin-v8-aussie-supercar-takes-shape-37587)

Dushan
5th Jan 2014, 20:48
I have experienced the embarrassment of a left handed thread, on a few occasions.

gileraguy
5th Jan 2014, 21:03
Truck wheel nuts on LHS are Left Hand Thread.

There were no markings on the ones we were trying to severely over tighten.

Picture a 200cm 100kg bloke jumping on a 800mm solid steel wheelbrace!

FullOppositeRudder
5th Jan 2014, 21:50
I was able to do most jobs on my early vehicles (1964 onwards) but when I bought a new V6 Misterbishi sedan in 1996, it all changed. I haven't put a spanner on a motor since. Fortunately our vehicles have been free (so far) of the need for serious intervention.

However there are some absolute horror stories appearing in our Saturday motoring columns in the regional newspapers. I really wouldn't be confident in purchasing anything these days from a short list of manufacturers who seem to be repeat offenders.

A few days back I was having lunch with a friend who recounted how the recent replacement of a water pump on his relatively new and current SUV required the removal of the engine! Some excellent planning and design goes into that one.

I could replace the water pump on the old EH-HQ Holdens in about 30 minutes and the new pump assembly used cost about $15 at the most.

I must be getting old.

Blacksheep
5th Jan 2014, 22:36
When I was in Borneo a local chap had a BMW 5 series that kept chugging to a stop. After spending thousands (at the BMW Dealers) on trying to fix it he gave up and one of my mechanics bought it. He simply ripped out the ECU and fuel injection and fitted a twin-choke carb. It ran perfectly well forever after - admittedly with less performance than a fully functional ex-factory 5 series but, hey - there are no autobahns in Borneo.

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2014, 22:56
In the early days we used to refer to it as fuel-rejection.

llondel
5th Jan 2014, 23:03
If those in Canadia and the USofA don't use the terms big end and little end, how do they differentiate which end is which?

If you're in Texas then you have the big end and the very big end. :E

llondel
5th Jan 2014, 23:25
My wife's Renault Scenic ('99 model) would occasionally just refuse to start, no apparent attempt at a spark at all. The local garage was without clue, although they're normally pretty good. However, Google turned up the answer, which turned out to be crud on the TDC sensor. Sensor didn't detect engine rotation, spark plugs (and possibly fuel injectors) didn't fire. I took the sensor off the engine, cleaned off the area, put it all back together and the engine started first time. I mentioned the cure to the guy at the garage so he'll know for next time.

As an engineering student I did plenty of car maintenance, but when I got my first new car, with warranty and everything, I let the garage do the dirty work for the most part.

Pappa Smurf
5th Jan 2014, 23:36
Full opposite Rudder.
Got the old V6 Magna myself--no problems until now--oil leak.
Its due for the timing belt change,so they can suss it out.Dont know whether to replace the 3 platinum spark plugs which are on the firewall side.
I had an old Holden---easy to work on.If it rained you could get in engine bay and pull the bonnet down--nearly.
Rear engine welsh plug sprung a leak----bugger lifting motor out--just cut hole in firewall to replace.

Loose Rivets
The top Sports Sedan here for many years has been an Alfa,mid mounted V8 and ZF rear mounted.But unlike the ones you mention this one is purpose built spaceframe with full fibre body and mega horsepower.

lomapaseo
6th Jan 2014, 00:30
Isnt it amazing how very rarely it really is a failure of any inscrutable black box! It is usually something physical that you can see once you find it.


Agree :ok:

it was so refreshing to open the hood (bonnet) after the car died and the sight of a connecting rod through the side of the block. No guessing at the cause and all the mecahnic would say is "seen it before"

John Hill
6th Jan 2014, 01:56
The late Peter Brock is reputed to have retired from a race at Mt Panorama with 'electrical problems', when asked to be more specific he said a flying big end had cracked the distributor cap!

onetrack
6th Jan 2014, 04:34
No-one does major repairs on cars in todays world - they're not designed to be repaired. With mechanics hourly costs running at $120 an hr, you can't afford to fix too much.

Once a modern vehicle has a serious number of kms on it, and a major electrical or drivetrain component failure happens - this means the vehicle is then scrapped, rather than repaired.
Nearly all the engine reconditioners in this city have shut up shop, with probably less than 5% still in business as compared to the 1960's, when they virtually had production-line engine reconditioning going on.
Parts resellers have fared equally badly. No-one replaces parts in vehicles today, they just replace the car.

Resale values of even "luxury" vehicles with moderate to high kms, are but a fraction of what they used to be. If it's out of warranty, no-one wants it, because of the fear and loathing of the huge maintenance/repairs costs, that come with age.

I can buy a 8-10 yr old Jag in excellent condition, with modest kms for less than AU$10,000. They were $80,000 or $90,000 when new. I don't want one, because I don't want $2000 service bills and $10,000 repair bills when things go wrong - as they surely do.
It's only a Ford, anyway, I keep telling people - not like the old Jags with their real leather and walnut dash, and their unique engineering (Jag suspensions from scrapped Jags are still fought over by hot-rodders).

I've seen a perfect-condition 8 yr old Range Rover with 70,000kms on it, scrapped, because the owner got it bogged in a flooded creek. The water came in through the door seals and a few gaps in the body, and just covered the carpets on the floor by about ankle depth. All the electronics promptly started showing major fault codes, so the insurance company wrote the vehicle off as unrepairable.

Compare that to a mates 1942 Chev 1 ton farm truck, that he was using one day in the late 1970's to haul water around the farm. He had a 200 gallon tank on the back and he backed into the inside slope of a farm dam, to pump water into the tank.

Unfortunately, as the water tank filled, the extra load was too much for the handbrake, and the weak compression (all farm vehicles are always left in gear, that is the optional handbrake!) - and the old Chevy rolled back into the dam and disappeared with a splash into 12 feet (3.6M) of muddy water!!

My mate went and got his brother, and a tractor, and they duck-dived on the old Chev, and attached a rope to the front bumper and pulled her out!
They drained all the oils and the fuel tank - and took the seat out and dried it in the sun - while they left the doors wide open, to dry out the inside of the cabin.
They then refilled all compartments with new oil, poured a small quantity of methylated spirits (denatured alcohol) into the fuel tank to absorb the remnant water - filled the tank with petrol, put the seat back in, and fired her up, and drove off!

I used to see that old Chevy still in use every day, around the farm in the late 1980's, until my mate sold the farm and retired! No hope of doing that with todays vehicles!

cattletruck
6th Jan 2014, 07:11
It's not the electronics that make a modern car turn into scrap before their time, it's the trend for manufacturers to withhold technical specs and to require special tooling to maintain it. This also makes maintenance more expensive as the car ages. Run out of warranty and your better off putting a lit match to it and claiming the insurance money - so much for having a low carbon footprint.

I'm trying to hang onto my current car for as long as I can, it's the last of the cast iron engines (Buick V6 also known as the L36). A few weeks ago my battery exploded while driving home in peak hour. The first sign that something was wrong was when I noticed the radio backlight was brighter than usual, then the instrument cluster began resetting itself until it finally switched off completely. The car still kept going however 5km from home I began wondering why the adjoining suburb stunk so much. When I got home I popped the bonnet (hood) and there was acid everywhere. Turns out the alternator failed boiling the battery electrolyte until the battery excused itself. Anyways it's all fixed now, bit of a job but I did it all myself.

Here's a pic of the L36 with the plastic sh!t (covers) removed. Just changed the coolant and need to bleed the air a few times before putting the plastic sh!t (covers) back on.

http://arthurguru.users.sourceforge.net/extra/L36engine.jpg

This has been a very reliable engine although it drinks about a litre of oil every 10,000 Kms, does get its pants whipped about with the slushbox cog held in a low gear. Strong and reliable car all round and is holding up very well with only a bit of rust underneath. I just hate that the steering wheel needs a lot of dialing to change direction, but that's an Aussie thing (steering with your leg :}).

Last garage service was while it was still under warranty 10 years ago, since then I've been doing all the maintenance myself using a trusty Haynes workshop manual as a guide. Saved many thousands of dollars and everything on it still works fine.

They don't make 'em like they used to.

onetrack
6th Jan 2014, 09:06
Cattletruck, they're a well-built, long-lasting, reliable engine - shame about the rest of the car. :(

OFSO
6th Jan 2014, 10:18
Honest John writing in the "Telegraph" claimed the life of a modern car is seven years. Beyond that date it's not economic to repair. Too many pricey sensors and 'orrible plastic clever bits.

My wife's Ford is ten years old, still not done 40,000 kms, recently had a camshaft drive belt change (obligatory at ten years), and new tires (UV damaged), but in perfect condition.

Last week I received a letter from the Ministry of Transport in Madrid, pointing out we're driving a car over ten years old, stating the mileage (!), the date of the last inspection (November last year) and the result (passed), and suggesting we replace it with a new car.

Borrocks, as the Japanese say.

ShyTorque
6th Jan 2014, 10:22
In UK, at least, if you don't like the cars in the market place, you're still allowed to build your own, as long as you can meet the IVA standards.

I'm in the process of fitting a different type of engine and gearbox to my project, which I first put together twelve years ago. This time it will have a DIY designed fuel injection system, a bit more complicated than the old SU carburettor.

crippen
6th Jan 2014, 12:42
:{and don't forget the canbus electric sysytems. These are designed to fool everybody,including the experts. They can be very expensive to repair.:{

Windy Militant
6th Jan 2014, 12:46
This time it will have a DIY designed fuel injection system, a bit more
complicated than the old SU carburettor.

Do they still make WAL Phillips injectors then! :rolleyes:

A couple years ago the Alternator went phut on my old Astra. No Probs thinks I, a recon unit and a few minutes with the spanners and I'm good to go.

Oh No, there are five different alternators fitted to that variant of Astra.
One has a Built in regulator/ rectifier
the other has the diode pack but an external regulator
then there's the one that has an external regulator/ rectifier
or the one that has a diode pack and is regulated by the black box that manages the engine.
Bugger thinks I, lets see what we've got. Hmm the alternator is hidden behind the engine so you really need to get the car on a lift to get at it.
Then I was told by the nice man at the reconditioners that if you get the wrong alternator it may well blow up the ECU.
At this point I called my mate and asked him if I could have a lift to work with him and booked the car into the garage on that day!

ShyTorque
6th Jan 2014, 13:55
Do they still make WAL Phillips injectors then!

That device did nothing much more than dribble fuel into the inlet manifold, not much more complicated than that. It was a piece of rubbish!

I've something much better in mind.

ShyTorque
6th Jan 2014, 14:08
and don't forget the canbus electric sysytems. These are designed to fool everybody,including the experts. They can be very expensive to repair.

Agreed! My wife's Citroen's rear windscreen wiper failed. She took it to a Citroen specialist who. like me, initially thought it would be a blown fuse. No such luck. It was then thought to be a wiring fault. Not that either. The second computer (body computer I think it was called) had failed, disabling several functions. It cost 700 to repair because a new unit had to be fitted and it then has to be reprogrammed to suit the individual vehicle, mileage, service history, etc. Much of the interior of the car needed to be removed to fault find and then change it. It was almost half the value of the car for that one job. It's since been traded in!

Smeagol
6th Jan 2014, 15:15
I am currently driving probably the best, most reliable car I have ever owned (that must have put the kiss of death on it!) a 2000 BMW 728 (an e38 to the aficionados). It has done over 165,000 miles (over 90,000 in my ownership over the last 4 and abit years) and has only required a couple of mechanical repairs/replacements in that time, none of which were greatly expensive.

I was thinking of replacing it recently when I got a face full of warning lights but a fair amount of research on BMW forums (mainly the 7seriesregister - got to give them a plug!) gave me sufficient info to purchase two items for 30 and 'voila' warning lights out and car should be good for a while yet!

I am not looking forward to having to find a replacement as it will be a hard act to follow!

AtomKraft
6th Jan 2014, 15:33
Windy

Re your alternator story.

On later Audis, 2002 on, so not exactly brand new.....even with the correct ( and quite expensive) replacement alternator.....

The car says 'Nein! Das is nicht MEIN alternator'. So the new part has to be coded to the individual car before it will operate.

So now, even having the correct, dealer provided replacement part is not enough. The dealer still has to have his cut by coding the part to 'your' car.

Unbelievable, and of benefit to who exactly?

vulcanised
6th Jan 2014, 16:45
Over the years I have gone from the bloke who fixes people's cars to the bloke who couldn't even fix his own car on one occasion.

John Hill
6th Jan 2014, 17:15
The Morris Minor Club visited our aviation museum recently, They had arranged in advance and we have an extra couple of volunteers to handle the numbers.

Now usually with car clubs they give us an estimate of numbers grossly in excess of those that actually turn up and of those who do arrive many have various excuses for not putting their hand too deep in their pockets. But the Morrie drivers all arrived and they were all clutching the agreed admission!

My next car will be a Morris Minor and we will get a rental (or take the bus) for the occasional trip to the big smoke.:ok:

cockney steve
6th Jan 2014, 20:38
I think a couple of people in this thread are deluded in thinking they know what they are talking about


fixed that for you!

Truck wheel nuts on LHS are Left Hand Thread.
So do Rolls Royce cars and they appear to be Phosphor-Bronze...overtighten 'em and you'll strip them!

How do they differentiate between the crankshaft (big end) bearings and the crankshaft main bearings?

Crankshaft MAINS support the centreline of the shaft (The Austin 7, prewar, was the most common 2-bearing crank....used to have a resonant frequency , decelerating from 40 mph thrugh 30 and snap....:eek: rectified on the Ruby 7 by adding a center-main iirc.

cockney steve
6th Jan 2014, 21:10
Honest John writing in the "Telegraph" claimed the life of a modern car is seven years. Beyond that date it's not economic to repair. Too many pricey sensors and 'orrible plastic clever bits.

Load of hogwash!...Agreed, many main -stealers use this as a frightener to sell a new one...a not-insignificant sector of the Independent Trade, make a comfortable living by rectifying the deficiencies with parts sourced from accident-writeoffs and others where it's worth more to break than sell complete...(see my Volvo example above....I'm just after another 2002 V40 estate, wants minor work and should be yet another 200-quid job. Plenty of cars on fleabay for little more than scrap price....As I said , it's the diagnostic skills that have changed, you can only deduce mechanical problems readily , by tuned ear and logical, methodical elimination...A code-reader will usually only give an "area to investigate" diagnosis...in the case of the volvo above, it simply diagnosed "Throttle body"

no clue if the flap positioning "motor" was faulty or the position sensor on the other end, or the two multipin connectors, or if it was a mechanical fault (sticking)-it was, -detatched magnet jamming it!
It could even have been a split connection hose!

Unfortunately, however skilled the mechanical parts-fitters are, many are completely lost when it comes to electronics , so they adopt the "scattergun" approach of blindly replacing parts, knowing they should eventually get the faulty one....they don't care about the cost, it's the punter paying!

500N
6th Jan 2014, 21:19
Last week where I was, had a bloke turn up to pick up an old Toyota Diesel that had been left in a paddock for 3 years. For those that know about these things,
it had a 1HZ motor.

Anyway, dropped a fresh battery in, warmed the glow plugs and she fired up second time which surprised me.

Out Of Trim
6th Jan 2014, 22:56
Hmmm had a 2000 VW Passat 1.8T was good for many years until Water ingress took out the Electric Windows, Central Locking, Interior Lights, Alarm system, Passenger Air Bag. So couldn't pass an MOT. Turbo then failed and decided to look for something else.

Found a 2001 Volvo S60 2.0T with 88,000 miles and all electrics work just fine, engine is very smooth for 1700. Fuel consumption is a little heavier but enjoying the extra performance! Happy so far..

llondel
7th Jan 2014, 02:16
Honest John writing in the "Telegraph" claimed the life of a modern car is seven years. Beyond that date it's not economic to repair. Too many pricey sensors and 'orrible plastic clever bits.

What's a "modern" car? Mine is in its fifteenth year, having owned it since new. Even the factory-fit battery lasted thirteen years.

spekesoftly
7th Jan 2014, 08:12
Hmmm had a 2000 VW Passat 1.8T was good for many years until Water ingress took out the Electric Windows, Central Locking, Interior Lights, Alarm system, Passenger Air Bag.A very common problem on Passats of that era, and usually caused by a build up of crud blocking the two drain holes under the battery and brake servo. Eventually water seeps into the front passenger footwell and soaks the wiring loom, connectors, and what VW call the "comfort control module". Expensive damage that can be avoided by regularly checking the drains, which is an easy if somewhat tedious DIY job.

Interior leaking | veedoubleu dot com (http://www.veedoubleu.com/passat/passat-leak)

Capetonian
7th Jan 2014, 08:26
What's a "modern" car? Mine is in its fifteenth year, having owned it since new. Even the factory-fit battery lasted thirteen years.
Then it's probably not what he would term 'a modern car'. I reckon the real rot set in about 2005.
Here's a little story. Saab 9-3. The key fob has four buttons encased in rubber. The rubber got worn and perished but what's inside still works, and will until it gets dirt of water inside, so the outside needs replacing, meantime I did a temporary fix with superglue and sellotape.
Saab dealer : New key, reprogrammed. 300
Handyman : New rubber cover, SAAB component, Ebay : 16.99

Georgeablelovehowindia
7th Jan 2014, 09:25
A very common problem on Passats of that era, and usually caused by a build up of crud blocking the two drain holes under the battery and brake servo. Eventually water seeps into the front passenger footwell and soaks the wiring loom, connectors, and what VW call the "comfort control module". Expensive damage that can be avoided by regularly checking the drains, which is an easy if somewhat tedious DIY job.

Interior leaking | veedoubleu dot com (http://www.veedoubleu.com/passat/passat-leak)

Our 1999 Audi A4 1.8T suffers from exactly the same fault, hardly a surprise. After an overnight downpour, the water was half way up the brake servo, and filled a gallon bucket on being syphoned. In this case it was tightly packed pine needles causing the blockage.

Removing the battery is exactly as shown and is a complete and utter pain.

spekesoftly
7th Jan 2014, 09:45
Removing the battery is exactly as shown and is a complete and utter painConsider yourself lucky that yours is petrol! ;) The diesels have a much larger (and heavier) battery, removal of which is an even bigger pain.

cattletruck
7th Jan 2014, 12:27
The key fob has four buttons encased in rubber. The rubber got worn and perished but what's inside still works, and will until it gets dirt of water inside, so the outside needs replacing

I just use a blob of builders silicon where the rubber buttons used to be, you don't even have to open the fob. First pick out all that decaying rubber then apply a generous blob of silicon, smooth it down with a scraper while pushing it in, let it dry, then with a blade cut and peel off the excess to reshape the buttons. The buttons are also easier to see when they're white, plus it looks cool too. Total cost: $3.

...and if you get it wrong the first time just open the fob and prize out the silicon, put it together again and have a second try.

TWT
9th Jan 2014, 01:06
Think I'll buy a rescue hammer..

Maybe there's a manual override but I can understand that some people might panic.

Woman locked inside Audi Q3 on 41-degree day (http://brisbanetimes.drive.com.au/motor-news/woman-locked-inside-audi-q3-on-41degree-day-20140108-30hde.html)

Capetonian
8th Mar 2014, 07:44
Above mentioned Saab has so many warnings that it just about tells you next time you're going to need a pee. Monday, OH takes it to work and calls me in the afternoon to say it won't start. Usual useless female description of symptoms, but I feared it was an electronic problem and had visions of huge sums of wonga to the local Saab licensed thief.

Intuitively I thought it could have been battery failure although the battery was only 18 months old so went down next day and sure enough it was. Battery replaced, charging circuit checked OK. Just seems odd that such a sophisticated car can't warn you as the battery nears the end of its life (even though after 18 months it shouldn't have.)

Krystal n chips
8th Mar 2014, 09:33
"Usual useless female description of symptoms, but I feared it was an electronic problem and had visions of huge sums of wonga to the local Saab licensed thief.



Oh dear. There seems to be a pattern emerging here with regard the many albeit self-perceived "failings" of the Female sex.....hence I suppose a career change as a "Relate" advisor would not really be the best option.


Intuitively I thought it could have been battery failure although the battery was only 18 months old so went down next day and sure enough it was. Battery replaced, charging circuit checked OK

However, all is not lost !.....engunearing now surfaces as a possible alternative it would seem. Thus, as one iz an engunear, one is always wiling to listen to those whose expertise surpasses ones own ( which is not difficult I grant you ) and who better it seems than......guess who ?

If you battery was flat / knackered after 18 months, one ponders if the item was the cheapest available when purchased and how old was it then ?

One is also curious as to how, with your self-proclaimed intuitive diagnostic skills ( one is more of the percussive engineering rectification school you understand, bleed / start valves a speciality :E ) the charging circuit was checked and, a minor detail but clearly solved by intuition, you were able to determine there was no leakage to earth in any other circuits.

We await "Intuitive Electwoniks for Begunners" therefore.....

Takan Inchovit
8th Mar 2014, 09:37
Perhaps informing the OH to stop ignoring the warnings and turn off those bloody lights may extend the battery life. :hmm:

vulcanised
8th Mar 2014, 11:54
With the tendency of some modern car batteries to die a sudden death for no apparent reason, it would take a very sophisticated electronic (or any) warning system to warn of an imminent demise.

Windy Militant
8th Mar 2014, 12:15
Not everyone has succumbed to the Cylon empire and bought overambitious toasters. The Colonial fleet is fighting back!
HRCR - The Historic Rally Car Register (http://www.hrcr.co.uk/)

Capetonian
9th Mar 2014, 08:37
On the way home last night warning flashes up on the console : "Left hand headlamp failure" .... and indeed it had, the dipped beam globe. This morning I had a closer look and indeed it looks difficult to get at. Go to the trusted Haynes and it starts off : "To replace headlight bulbs, start by jacking up the vehicle and removing the front bumper as described in chapter 11." FFS

(Oh, and KnC, I saw your sneering condescending little rant on the morning update. I have a couple of suggestions for you, in fact I have more than a couple, but the ones I can put here are :
Grow up, do something about the pine forest on your shoulder, don't judge everyone by your own standards, and I suspect somewhere there's a stone missing you, crawl back underneath it like a good boy.)

ShyTorque
9th Mar 2014, 08:50
My "recreational vehicle" has been off the road for quite a long time due to valve gear issues. I did the work to put that right over the last couple of weeks.

It had trouble getting through the emissions test during the MOT, but a slight adjustment (took three seconds) cured that, and it got a new ticket.

Having got that sorted, it wouldn't run off idle, it stuttered and stalled. Found the problem. A miniscule, almost imperceptible, sliver of brass is missing from a part designed in about 1910.

A new part will cost me a tenner. Five minutes work with a screwdriver and Allen key then a few adjustments, and the problem should be cured.

thing
9th Mar 2014, 09:12
Give me a modern car anyday. I don't miss the weekends spent underneath the car just to get it running for the following week. The last time I had anything go wrong with a car was when a CV joint went on the driveshaft of a VW I had about twelve years ago. You don't even have to check the oil or tyre pressures on the one I have now, it does it itself. All I have to do is put fuel in it and fill up the washer bottle when it tells me it needs filling. I even give some very nice Eastern European lads a fiver every other week to give it a good wash.

A A Gruntpuddock
9th Mar 2014, 11:42
My second Proton, usually very reliable.

Left idle in the garage for months due to ill health then eventually recharged the battery.

Noticed the immobiliser light was on but it started anyway. Stalled it a couple of times getting it out but restarted no problem so drove it round to the front door.

Next morning, cranked away but nothing happened.

Tried all the cures found online then had it towed to the local motor electricians.

They tried for over a week (I think they didn't like being beaten) and even bought some new software but to no avail.

All they could find was an error message for the immobiliser circuit. Said that even if they could get them, cost of the parts would exceed the value of the car.

Immobiliser circuit could not be isolated or bypassed so eventually had it towed away for scrap.

So much for modern electronics - when a colleague lost the keys to his Maxi I got him home with a bit of wire and a couple of crocodile clips!

IFMU
9th Mar 2014, 13:02
My 99 Saturn has over 166K miles. Still going. Had to replace coil packs about 10,000 miles ago, had to replace a starter, and also a serpentine belt. Have redone the brakes a few times. Was all done on one Saturday or another. When my kid turns 15 in a couple years we will rebuild the motor. It uses oil. Will be a good project for him. I don't miss the old cars. I don't miss having to fix them. I don't miss points or distributors. I don't miss carbs. Good riddance!

Krystal n chips
9th Mar 2014, 13:23
" On the way home last night warning flashes up on the console : "Left hand headlamp failure" .... and indeed it had, the dipped beam globe. This morning I had a closer look and indeed it looks difficult to get at. Go to the trusted Haynes and it starts off : "To replace headlight bulbs, start by jacking up the vehicle and removing the front bumper as described in chapter 11." FFS"


First, let me thank you for your fulsome praise which was really quite heart warming to read.

Now, lets have a look at Electronics and Intuition, possibly an entirely new technical field opening up as we speak !

I was surprised that you needed a dashboard warning....surely, intuition would have alerted you !.....that and the rather obvious fact that, erm, it's now become "rather dark" on the left hand side when on dipped beam ?

The above however, pales into insignificance in comparison to your, as yet unexplained diagnostic intuition as to how, whilst the battery was knackered, a definitive engineering term used only by those at the most basic level such as myself for example, you were able to diagnose there was no leakage to earth elsewhere or how the charger circuit was working.

You may recall these questions were posed previously and, with my thirst for knowledge clearly I would appreciate being enlightened.

cattletruck
9th Mar 2014, 14:40
I don't have a "regular" mechanic, but when my alternator started putting out 18V which blew up my battery, being on foot I had no choice but to visit the local garage which has recently morphed from an exclusive taxi cab repairer to general car repairer. When I asked the chief mechanic if he could just source the module for the alternator he said don't bother, get a reconditioned one with new bearings and has been bench tested just for the peace of mind. He was right.

Capetonian
9th Mar 2014, 21:28
Go to the trusted Haynes and it starts off : "To replace headlight bulbs, start by jacking up the vehicle and removing the front bumper as described in chapter 11." FFSI won't be trusting Haynes any more. Had a closer look under the bonnet this morning, by removing the battery cover and fuse box cover to give a bit more room in which to work, I was able to pull the holder out of the housing and replace the bulb in less than 5 minutes, and that was working with one hand. A bit fiddly but I didn't need to go through the processes outlined in the manual!

Dushan
9th Mar 2014, 23:54
Could it be that the other side cannot be done that way?

ex_matelot
10th Mar 2014, 02:01
Krystal...why don't you just f*ck off please.

Edit> I know nothing about auto engineering and started reading this thread. I found it insightful and interesting with some good anecdotes...the along came Krystal, ironically with a spanner in the works.

Krystal - have you ever tried being accepted or liked by anybody, online and in real life?

Capetonian
10th Mar 2014, 12:17
Could it be that the other side cannot be done that way? No, the other side (RH) is almost completely unobstructed.

ex_matelot
+1! (I haven't read KC's latest pathetic remarks. I assume the poor fellow has a background of serious problems, perhaps he was an abused child and never got over it, but I'm sure his mother loves him.)

Krystal n chips
10th Mar 2014, 13:36
ex_matelot...

That was such a kind sentiment.....a bit premature in my case, but, have you ever thought of writing eulogies for a living ?

Yes, me Mum does love me...next doors Cat however, well since the hooman pruned the borders foliage without prior consultation, then, to judge from the look and noise, sheer contempt and indignation, the hooman will die...very soon.

I too like this thread about cars and their maintenance and thus, when a post piques my interest, I respond and in particular when advanced diagnostic, albeit as yet unspecified, techniques are mentioned.

Equally, credit where credit is due and I can only muse as to how the manual dexterity of using one hand is such a defining trait across so many areas of life.