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con-pilot
7th Dec 2013, 19:28
we're catching up with you.

We just had a 4.5 earthquake a few minutes ago. The center was about 20 miles from us, but our house shook pretty good and a friend that lives 50 miles away felt as well.

Until now, the recent earthquakes have been in 2.0-2.3 range. No dammage reports as of yet, as no news crews have reached the area. I doubt seriously that there will be any injuries or major damage.

But it is the strongest earthquake we've had since since 1952.

Must be this here global warming stuff I've been hearing about. :p

redsnail
7th Dec 2013, 20:14
Probably some oil baron dropped his wallet :p

cavortingcheetah
7th Dec 2013, 20:29
We had one in Johannesburg on the evening of Monday, December 2nd. Three days later, on December 5th, one of my wedding anniversaries, Nelson Mandela died.
http://files.myopera.com/yalkaurawing/albums/8216572/Allah%20is%20great.jpg

west lakes
7th Dec 2013, 20:39
Or is it a side effect of a mass Brussels Sprouts eating practice :E

pigboat
7th Dec 2013, 20:45
Con did your dog display any symptoms of anxiety before the event? 4.5 to 5.2 shakers are a fairly common occurrence around here, we get one every couple of years. The epicentre is usually out in the Gulf of St. Lawrence about 40 - 50 miles SE of here. We used to have a mini schnauzer and he'd go frantic about 30 minutes before hand.

tony draper
7th Dec 2013, 21:14
If you insist on living upon a planet with active plate tectonics,try and build your house in the middle of the plate rather than the edge.:)

radeng
7th Dec 2013, 21:38
I've been in an earthquake - once. 0730 in Anaheim, and radeng is taking an early morning leisurely sh*t. Talk about shaking the sh*t out of you! Or 'radeng sh*ts, California has an earthquake!'

Only (!) a 5.6 - nobody thought anything of it.

But that one earthquake was two too many for me......

California has four seasons - Earthquake, brush fire, mud slide and riot.

OFSO
7th Dec 2013, 21:58
More fracking, more underground gas storage, more shake, rattle 'n roll.

con-pilot
7th Dec 2013, 21:59
Con did your dog display any symptoms of anxiety before the event? 4.5 to 5.2 shakers are a fairly common occurrence around here, we get one every couple of years. The epicentre is usually out in the Gulf of St. Lawrence about 40 - 50 miles SE of here. We used to have a mini schnauzer and he'd go frantic about 30 minutes before hand.

Naw, not our dogs, unless it is food related, they don't get too excited about anything.

Now our cats on the other hand, had very, very big eyes after it was over. They were lookng at me like I caused it. :p

"What did you do daddy?" :*

OFSO
7th Dec 2013, 22:05
They were lookng at me like I caused it.

In the world of the cats, we human servants ARE responsible for anything: rain snow heat drought, loud noises, insolent mice - we are always to blame.

racedo
7th Dec 2013, 22:16
You had a 2.8 one 76 minutes later...................

Maybe that movie where the US splits in 2 in the centre is really going to occur.

OK465
7th Dec 2013, 22:18
It was -6 degrees C with a 4.5 earthquake.

Okie life quality index score for the day -1.5 :}

Mechta
7th Dec 2013, 22:54
Back in 1981, I saw the following words on a bumper sticker in a Los Angeles gift shop:

'The Californian belief: One day, everything East of the San Andreas Fault will fall into the Atlantic.'

tony draper
7th Dec 2013, 23:05
Chancing Human time against Geological time is always a tempting bet otherwise people wouldn't live on the side of Volcanoes.
:)

VFD
7th Dec 2013, 23:28
It was -6 degrees C with a 4.5 earthquake.

Okie life quality index score for the day -1.5You forgot to add about 4 inches of snow with more on the way tonight.


I was kind of under the impression that many drivers were doing well with the road conditions until I made a trip this afternoon and noticed many speed limit signs, street signs and stops signs knocked down.


VFD

11Fan
7th Dec 2013, 23:43
Con,

Generally, a 4.5 round here raises eyebrows, but that's about it, unless you're near the epicenter. 5.0 and above will get your attention and it's been a while since we've had one here in SoCal. I'm 50 miles from the San Andreas but sandwiched between the the Newport Inglewood Fault and the Whittier, both who act up on occasion.

There group of people here at work that when an earthquake happens we start a pool to determine magnitude and epicenter. About 8 years ago we had one and I nailed it within .1 Mag and 15 miles. Turns out 10 minutes after, they changed it because there was a glitch that gave a false reading.

Apparently, I cant guess the epicenters and magnitudes, but I guess the false readings. :hmm:

mikedreamer787
7th Dec 2013, 23:48
But it is the strongest earthquake we've had since since 1952.

Must be this here global warming stuff I've been hearing about. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/tongue.gif

The loonies will have a hard time pinning it on global
warming because in 1952 they hadn't invented it yet.

500N
7th Dec 2013, 23:50
"If you insist on living upon a planet with active plate tectonics,try and build your house in the middle of the plate rather than the edge.http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/smile.gif"

Coming from one of the few towns in Australia severley damaged
by an earthquake ;)

West Coast
8th Dec 2013, 00:53
Earthquakes now, soon you'll start electing left of center politicians, spending other peoples money, ban guns and then you'll be just like California.

indiscipline_girl
8th Dec 2013, 04:50
There's nothing new about OK being earthquake country, but the recent large increase is probably due to fracking.


Since January 2009, more than 200 magnitude 3.0 or greater earthquakes have rattled Central Oklahoma, marking a significant rise in the frequency of these seismic events.

The U.S. Geological Survey and Oklahoma Geological Survey are conducting collaborative research quantifying the changes in earthquake rate in the Oklahoma City region, assessing the implications of this swarm for large-earthquake hazard, and evaluating possible links between these earthquakes and wastewater disposal related to oil and gas production activities in the region.

Studies show one to three magnitude 3.0 earthquakes or larger occurred yearly from 1975 to 2008, while the average grew to around 40 earthquakes per year from 2009 to mid-2013.

USGS Release: Earthquake Swarm Continues in Central Oklahoma (10/22/2013 1:07:59 PM) (http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3710)

BenThere
8th Dec 2013, 05:01
That's another unsung benefit of fracking. It may be mitigating tectonic pressure that would otherwise build to result in a disastrous earthquake.

A A Gruntpuddock
8th Dec 2013, 06:26
I seem to recall that inducing lots of small earthquakes by water injection was proposed as a means of relieving stress in the faults to avoid larger shocks.

Probably put forward by the same people now opposing fracking.

Rwy in Sight
8th Dec 2013, 07:59
11Fan,

It is worrying not to have an earthquake for a long time if you live in seismic prone area.


Rwy in Sight

OFSO
8th Dec 2013, 08:04
Maybe that movie where the US splits in 2 in the centre is really going to occur.

Apologies if this irritates anyone opposed to esoteric techniques: but in forward regression studies done under hypnosis. at least half of the subjects "taken forward" to the year 2050 reported a large body of water where California used to be.

Back to the cats.....

Lancair70
8th Dec 2013, 09:30
"If you insist on living upon a planet with active plate tectonics,try and build your house in the middle of the plate rather than the edge.http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/smile.gif"

Coming from one of the few towns in Australia severley damaged
by an earthquake http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif


I think if you re read the original posters location, it says Newcastle, UK. Not NSW Australia.

SawMan
8th Dec 2013, 09:47
I think if you re read the original posters location, it says Newcastle, UK. Not NSW Australia.

Many times in the past, on consuming enough of a bottled liquid namesake of that fair city, I did have a tough time standing up what with all the ground moving underneath me. Odd that the seismographs never seemed to register those moments....

John Hill
8th Dec 2013, 09:50
Earthquakes, everyone has a story. We had just poured the concrete slab for our new house when an earthquake gave it a good thorough compacting down.:ok:

Not so good for other folks though as 60% of the commercial buildings in this town were damaged and many will be demolished and just up the road in Christchurch 185 people died and the central city is now trying very hard not to become a wasteland.

A A Gruntpuddock
8th Dec 2013, 09:57
"forward regression studies" wtf?

tony draper
8th Dec 2013, 10:19
One has however wandered the streets of that antipodian copy,half a century ago,they probably have electricity and running water there now.
:rolleyes:

Krystal n chips
8th Dec 2013, 10:54
Meanwhile, not to be outdone, ones home city duly produced.......

The Manchester earthquake swarm of October 2002 (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....10286B)

California ?......nowt by comparison therefore.....:p

ExXB
8th Dec 2013, 14:11
I was on the 50th floor of a Tokyo skyscraper when our host pointed out the window - to see the city rocking. Well it wasn't rocking, we were swaying. Bit of an argument amongst the Japanese about the likely intensity with guesses between 4.5 and 6. We learned later in was 'only' 5.1 ...

Lonewolf_50
9th Dec 2013, 16:06
The difference between a tremor and an earthquake is that in the 3 and 4 Richter level, a few things in the house shake and rattle, maybe, during a tremor.

In an earthquake, something well over a 5, you may see a few things start to break loose. My son was born after we got 5+ aftershocks in CA after a 7.2 hit Palm Desert a few hundred miles away. Our house vibrated, wife got scared, and the glass ware on the shelves made clacking rattling noises. The chandeliers made tinklying sounds as the cut glass bits nudged each other.

Put another way, con: that wasn't an earthquake, it was a tremor. ;)

OFSO
9th Dec 2013, 16:13
We get a lot of earthquakes here on this end of the Pyrannees. Although they are low on the Richter Scale, the perception depends on how far, how deep, and in what sort of rock (and whether it's 'our' rock). Many of them sound like a single far-off explosion, short and sharp, indistinguishable from a WW-II or Civil War mine being detonated nearby (a not-infrequent happening). Earthquakes which happen further off - for example in the flood plain of the TÍt River on which Perpignan is built - are quite different - a long drawn-out rumble and vibration.

And frankly that does it for me - don't want nothing stronger.

con-pilot
9th Dec 2013, 17:07
Put another way, con: that wasn't an earthquake, it was a tremor.

All I can say is, the gubertmint agency wot be in charge of such tings, done went and called it one of dem earthiequcks.

Now just who am I to doubt the Obama Government, that has said that this was an earthquake caused by fracing and Anthropogenic Global Warming*.

I mean really, what kind of American would disbelieve a Obama Government agency. :rolleyes:



* Most caused by me frying turkeys and cooking steaks on charcoal outside. :p

Lonewolf_50
9th Dec 2013, 18:36
I grilled steaks last night, outside.
Temp was 48 degrees.
It was 46 when I woke up this morning.
I therefore cooled the earth by 2 degrees, locally, with my grilling.

See what I did there? I used libtard logic. :p

Lon More
9th Dec 2013, 18:55
Better not tell the NRA* , they'll accept it as fact.



NRA - National Retards Association,