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racedo
4th Dec 2013, 18:38
Brought about by a friend in Scotland who was made redundant last week........

Last day he turned up for work, his boss had arranged a late lunch (2pm) meal with drinks with lots of senior people present.
Unhappy about redundancy he excused himself for a few minutes about noon, got in car and drove home not to return.
Apparently lunch was a very uncomfortable affair, old boss made to look stupid which apparently he said was intention as had been lots of bullying going on.
Friday night met up with guys who were his mates from work to celebrate his leaving. HR wrote his reference and in his file for anyone asking as part of redundancy agreement and has new job already lined up.

Other examples ?

ShyTorque
4th Dec 2013, 19:03
An ex-colleague and pal of mine from the USA rang up Operations just before lunch (we were in HK) and said he needed to speak to the chief pilot because he wasn't coming in that afternoon.

The CP took the phone and told him that no way could he be excused and must come in to fly his shift.

My pal said he couldn't make it because he was at Los Angeles Airport and had left the outfit forever.

rgbrock1
4th Dec 2013, 19:39
I think my method of resigning my position with the State of CT Judicial Branch worked very well. I marched into my manager's office at the time and said:

"**** you. I 'm outta here. Bitch."

And started to leave.

To which she responded:

"But... but... but what about a two-week notice".

To which I responded: "F**k the notice. See ya."

and left.

500N
4th Dec 2013, 19:45
RGB

I will say one thing, you are all class !!!

rgbrock1
4th Dec 2013, 19:58
500N:

If you knew the manager I was referring to you'd understand my obvious lack of class.

Put it this way. She, the former manager, would make the Wicked Witch of the West seem like the pope.

(Hint: Her favorite refrain she repeated often enough? "Men are garbage.")

Next question? :}

Fox3WheresMyBanana
4th Dec 2013, 21:38
The only way to do it in the sandpit is to leave work normally at the end of the week, and be on another continent by the first day of next week.

tony draper
4th Dec 2013, 21:52
Throw his front door key on his desk and ask him to tell his wife you wont be seeing her anymore.
:rolleyes:

BillHicksRules
4th Dec 2013, 21:55
TD,

What is your wife's key budget?:E

carlrsymington
4th Dec 2013, 22:49
A senior executive invited our small team to a rather nice restaurant for Friday lunch as a get to know the team event. I waited to 11:45 pm to e-mail my manager my resignation without telling her I was off to Fujitsu (it was a big computer company at the time).
We all went to lunch and at the end, he asked us some get to you know you type questions and one of these was "Where do you see yourself in 2 years?"
To which I replied Fujitsu. I just wish I had of been the 1st to be asked.:p

critter592
5th Dec 2013, 04:04
A few years ago, I worked for a tool hire company. All was going well, until the branch I worked at had a change of management.

Said manager had a motorbike, and was of the opinion that a Transit van could nip through stationary traffic like a motorcyclist. He also encouraged drivers to break the speed limit.
What didn't help matters was that the van I was issued with was old, and so slow that it needed a week's notice before travelling on the motorway.
This guy didn't like people who speak their mind, so I was extremely unpopular with him. He took to 'phoning me every few minutes, asking where I was.
This lasted about four or five weeks, and I was getting heartily sick of him.
I had come *this* close to decking the c:mad: one day, but my opportunity came just after I'd been "headhunted" by a rival hire company.

On the day in question, I was asked to take a very large, trailer-mounted generator from Nottingham to the York branch. This trailer's road speed was limited to 50mph, and, to be honest I was expecting a call from him long before I arrived at York.
Sure enough, several calls came, the first ones I ignored, I answered (I think), his 5th call. During the argument that followed, I told him I could "only drive at 50, or as fast as the guy in front," and that his constant calls were affecting my concentration, so I would be switching the 'phone off.

Upon arrival at York, I delivered the generator, collected the stock that was going to Nottingham, and left. I drove round the corner from the branch, and waited.
5pm, I walked to the branch door, and posted the van keys and mobile phone through the door with a short note, and walked to York station. Once I was on the train, I then switched my personal mobile on. It rang almost immediately.

BM: "Where the f:mad: are you? How :mad: long does it take you to get to :mad: York?"
ME: "Like I said, I can only go as fast as the road conditions, etc permit. I have delivered the genny, and the other stuff's on the van!"
BM: "Well, take it straight to the site. And don't expect overtime. How long will you be?"
ME: "Well, I should be a little bit quicker getting to Nottingham than I was getting to York!"
BM: "Don't :mad: about with me. HOW LONG?"
ME: "About 20 minutes. I'm at Grantham."
BM: "What the :mad: are you doing at Grantham?"
Me: "Changing trains for Nottingham... Your van's at York. I'll text you the grid reference."

I then hung up...

500N
5th Dec 2013, 04:18
Critter

Good one.

11Fan
5th Dec 2013, 04:38
Many moons ago, after a year, I was given a 25 cent an hour raise. It was on a nice neat prepared form. I turned it over and wrote "Please consider this my two-week notice", signed and dated it.

treadigraph
5th Dec 2013, 07:08
We had a agency draughtsman join us for a couple of months, nice chap, very good at his job, conscientious, etc. After a week or two, he failed to turn up one day; phone call to the agency elicited a "can't get hold of him", etc.

A couple of days later he phoned in, full of apologies, to tell us he had been deported home to Nigeria...

Worrals in the wilds
5th Dec 2013, 07:15
A couple of days later he phoned in, full of apologies, to tell us he had been deported home to Nigeria...
Bugger. :uhoh:
Back in my entertainment days I worked for a company that had to post bail so we could get the key performer out of custody and on stage in time for the performance. Boofhead had been routinely stopped by the police and decided the best course of action was to take a swing at one of them. :ugh:

We were even grumpier about it than the coppers were. Given the nightly takings we probably would have come out ahead financially if we'd left the idiot in the watch house and cancelled the gig, but that's not the Showbiz way. :\:}

Groundgripper
5th Dec 2013, 09:42
We had one chap in our department in a company near Bedford who always seemed to be in only two or three days a week. Management didn't seem too concerned so we thought nothing of it - until he disappeared completely. Apparently he had been doing the rest of the week at a firm near Stevenage who also thought they were employing him full-time. I think they found out first and told us.:O

GG

Gordon17
5th Dec 2013, 10:24
Years ago I worked for a large family owned haulage company where one of the depot managers was a very "old school" transport manager - WW2 veteran who introduced himself to his workforce as "My surname's H****, and my first name's Mister".

Some years before I joined he had been offered a job at a competitor and so decided to try to get a pay rise. When it was refused he said words to the effect of, "Well you can stuff your job up your *rse", tossed his company car keys on the desk and walked out.

Just under 2 weeks later his new employer was taken over by his old employee. Luckily for him the owner found the whole thing very funny and often referred to it in management meetings and his retirement presentation about 15 years after the event.

Fliegenmong
5th Dec 2013, 11:24
...Being tightly constrained by a requirement to provide 2 weeks notice of leave lest the few days of accrued leave entitlement / agreement be forfeited...I applied for two weeks leave to attend my sisters wedding in the UK?....once granted, I put in my resignation effective the day after leave ended, thus allowing me to give the agreed notice, so as I could receive my very meagre payout , whilst enabling me to start a new job while I was technically still employed by my previous employer, but on leave from them! :}

yeah crap i know, effectively I was on holiday with one employer, whilst starting with a new employer....so I was never really on holidays at all., just ensuring I was able to receive my agreed entitlement inside if the lopsided work place agreement laws.....

We are not a smart country....:{

Blacksheep
5th Dec 2013, 12:18
I was working for a large national carrier in Kuala Lumpur. Engineering assigned me and another avionics supervisor to a third party B737 C Check with three mechanics each. The check was in for 21 days and we were to work 12-hour days. By the end of the first week the other supervisor had been re-assigned to the Filght Line and the six mechanics were down to four and later just two. At the end of the three weeks, having worked hard through three full weeks including weekends, I went to see the Base Foreman to arrange for six lieu days.

He said I was only entitled to lieu days when I'd worked on a rostered day off - and I had been rostered to work 21 days so I wasn't entitled. I went to see the manager and he refused to overturn the foreman's decision as it "would set a precedent". That night I phoned the Head of Engineering at my old company in Brunei and secured a job in Technical Services. A week later, after a visit to the town office I had the contract documents signed and with my flight tickets in hand I went to see the manager again. I gave him my letter telling the company that after five months of the six-month probation period, the company had failed their probation and I was leaving them with immediate effect.

. . . and off I went. 'Just like that!' as Tommy Cooper would say.

Fliegenmong
5th Dec 2013, 12:38
Blacksheep!!!:ok::ok::ok::ok:

rgbrock1
5th Dec 2013, 13:12
11Fan wrote:

Many moons ago, after a year, I was given a 25 cent an hour raise. It was on a nice neat prepared form. I turned it over and wrote "Please consider this my two-week notice", signed and dated it.

Did that happen when you were in the Cav? Somehow, though, I don't see the second sentence working out too well in that scenario!!! :}

Metro man
5th Dec 2013, 13:47
I know a pilot who hid his employers helicopter when he left, of course there are far more possible hiding places than there are with a fixed wing aircraft and it took quite a while before it was found.

I left an employer and wasn't paid all of my due money. When contacted by the industry authority over some concerns they had regarding the company, I made a very thorough disclosure in response to questions regarding the company's financial affairs. This included the fact that a firm of solicitors was owed money. This statement ended up being used as evidence in a court case, and when their legal representatives heard this they dumped them in the middle of the case.:E

Gertrude the Wombat
5th Dec 2013, 13:48
My boss was in my office being a pain, as usual, going on and on.


My phone rang. I listened for a few seconds and put it down.


"Right, that was my wife calling to tell me that she's just got the signed contract back [I was leaving a permanent job to go contracting], so please can you leave my office so that I can write you a resignation letter.]

racedo
5th Dec 2013, 15:32
The only way to do it in the sandpit is to leave work normally at the end of the week, and be on another continent by the first day of next week.

Know quite a number of guys from Northern Ireland who avail of legal opportunity to have both Irish and British passports.

Its funny because all have different allegiances politically but when going to the sandpit one said, politcial allegiance is fine but to get the F***** hell out of there if required is much more important, then when get home report passport as lost.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
5th Dec 2013, 17:28
Very sensible. The only reason I stayed two months is it took me two months to get my passport back.

carlrsymington
5th Dec 2013, 18:49
You are not wrong,
I know so may RUC \PSNI officers who carry both passports.
My only problem is deciding whether they are buying them for safety reasons or because they are the tightest B**stards ever known. For those that don't know Irish passports were much cheaper. Today - I don't know the price of passports.

racedo
5th Dec 2013, 19:05
You are not wrong,
I know so may RUC \PSNI officers who carry both passports.
My only problem is deciding whether they are buying them for safety reasons or because they are the tightest B**stards ever known. For those that don't know Irish passports were much cheaper. Today - I don't know the price of passports.

Its not a new thing as remember a friend who got married in Down about 15 years ago telling me that her brothers friends all had 2 as they used them to have 2 years in OZ, came back home and then had 2 more with different passport.

Metro man
6th Dec 2013, 00:16
Prudent Northern Ireland protestants, especially landowners, have been know to acquire passports from the Irish Republic just incase.

In the event of Irish reunification they can simply hoist the tricolour in front of the house and wave an Irish passport which they have held for many years and hope their land won't be nationalised.

Given Britain's record of looking after people in it's former colonies (Rhodesia/Hong Kong) it seems to be a sensible precaution.

SawMan
6th Dec 2013, 12:06
Only twice have I given notice of my departure; once when the company deserved it and once when I was going into a different business (which I'd discussed with them already) Otherwise, when the subject of having to give notice comes up, I tell them that I give as much notice on quitting as they give people upon firing. Can't argue the fairness of that, can they? And for those who try to tell me that there's a difference, I tell them "Not on my end there isn't"!

Many times this subject has arisen during job interviews or at hiring, and if they give me much grief after my explanation, I know that their logic has failed already so I walk out the door before they can do anything worse to me. My usual message on leaving is an instruction for them to practice self-intercourse of the sexual kind (but said quite differently!) with me then simply gathering my stuff and walking away. And it always feels a lot better right away!

mikedreamer787
7th Dec 2013, 00:12
"**** you. I 'm outta here. Bitch."

Same here when I happened to remark to a
past chief pilot's large mammaried secretary
that she had very nice breasts and she then
ranted on how I was so sexist and demeaning
and how she was going to go and report me to
the chief pilot.

mikedreamer787
7th Dec 2013, 23:02
http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/avatars/th_banned.gif


I don't think I'll be making any references to Paul Simon in the future! :bored:

I.R.PIRATE
8th Dec 2013, 03:19
Having waited over two months for my salary and ticket home, while on contract in West Africa, and after a particularly vexing phone call with the boss' wife who used to do his dirty work, I packed my stuff into the aircraft, flew it back to the company home base 3800 nm away and parked it in front of the company hangar just after midnight.

I went home and slept well, knowing that seven sorts of shyte was about to break loose when they arrived at work the next morning to find their cash-cow contract aircraft parked at home, and the client wondering why he was not able to fly his daily schedules due an undeniable lack of flying-machine. They had no other crew for the machine at that exact time, so it cost them the contract.

I never got paid, but at least they didn't either.

Solid Rust Twotter
8th Dec 2013, 16:08
Similar one to Mr PIRATE.

A company I flew for had me on a string with lies and obfuscation every time I called the head office. The deal promised with salary never materialised and a three month contract eventually stretched to almost six months living in a tent in an inhospitable part of the world. There were always excuses and promises to fix the situation but nothing ever got done. Eventually I raided the petty cash tin and bought a ticket home, leaving the receipt in the tin with what was left of the cash.

Shocked looks all round when I showed up at the office in a filthy mood and told them where they could shove their new contract (the old one having expired three months previously).

piperboy84
8th Dec 2013, 18:53
I owned a telephone systems service company with branches in several large US cities, our work involved fixing the phones on the desks of large commercial customers and government offices and interfacing with the large phone companies that provided the trunk lines connected to the systems we looked after on the customers premises.

Around 2003 we won the contract to look after the offices for the city of Memphis , being California based we ran an ad for new staff there, we hired a highly experienced chap and sent him his work kit and service truck, the contract went greAt for about 4 years and his reports all showed minimum down time and excellent customer service UNTIL the customer requested a meeting with both "our guy" and the person responsible for providing the trunk lines from the local telco, as you've already guessed only one person did OR COULD show up for the meeting !

After an investigation we found out the local telco guy had seen our ad got hired and kept his old job, he had 2 liveried work trucks parked in his driveway, 2 pay checks every month, 2 retirement accounts and 2 company Xmas parties to attend every year. Smartest employee I ever had !

ShyTorque
8th Dec 2013, 19:28
Given Britain's record of looking after people in it's former colonies (Rhodesia/Hong Kong) it seems to be a sensible precaution.

Indeed. Even on government contract it was a strange, uneasy feeling watching the head of your government and his family and a member of the Royal Family quite literally sail away in the night, leaving you and your young family to fend for themselves, under a new regime of uncertain intent. You are required to re-sign the UK Official Secrets Act before they leave and then off they go.

The new regime sends in soldiers in armoured personnel carriers as one of their first priorities. The aircraft you flew today becomes re-registered and adorned with the insignia of the new government overnight. Your rank badges have to be handed back and you are issued with new ones.

But your contract requires you to carry on as if you hadn't noticed. Strange times.

Fareastdriver
8th Dec 2013, 20:00
But your contract requires you to carry on as if you hadn't noticed. Strange times.

At the end of the day, you didn't really notice.

All the TV pictures of that night I saw had PLA soldiers sitting in the back of trucks waving to everybody.

Worrals in the wilds
8th Dec 2013, 21:28
All the TV pictures of that night I saw had PLA soldiers sitting in the back of trucks waving to everybody. I remember seeing that on the TV footage and thinking 'well, at least they look friendly, that's a start'. There was a bit of local chatter down here about which way it would go, and whether we'd need to take an influx of fleeing British Nationals if it went bad.
I thought you guys got a lousy deal from the UK Government, even though it ended up being okay.

ShyTorque
8th Dec 2013, 21:34
At the end of the day, you didn't really notice.

No, but at the end of the year, I noticed enough to resign from my contract.

Lantern10
8th Dec 2013, 21:50
After ten years in my last UK job I finally decided to move to Australia.
Everyone knew accept the Pr*&k of boss. I was owed about six weeks sick leave, so six weeks before departure I stopped going in and rung head office to tell them I was off sick till my back improved.
Sold my house to a friend and moved in with a mate for the last few weeks. All my gear was on the docks in the UK waiting for a boat to take it to Australia.
Anyway I found out that the boss had been to former house to see me only to be told "He's gone to Australia" (would have loved to see his face at that point).
I then rang head office and told them I wasn't coming back and just to put any monies owed in to my bank account, I then gave my mother the card and access numbers and told what was in there was hers.
I already had my ticket, then the docks went on strike, I ended up getting off the plane in Bombay, as it was then called, and headed down to Goa till the docks went back to work. It took a month then back on the plane to Oz

India Four Two
9th Dec 2013, 04:43
But your contract requires you to carry on as if you hadn't noticed. Strange times.

ShyTorque,

Strange times indeed. Quite by chance, I transited through Kai Tak on the morning after the handover. A couple of minor changes that I noticed were PLA gunboats in the RN docks and the new flags flying everywhere. However, the most noticeable effect of the handover was the large number of "tired and emotional" expats sitting and lying around the transit area, waiting to catch flights home after the party. ;)

India Four Two
9th Dec 2013, 04:48
I thought you guys got a lousy deal from the UK Government, even though it ended up being okay.

Worrals,

You should read Chris Patton's book. If he had not been there as Governor, there would have been no deal at all. "Sir Humphrey" wanted to just wash his hands of the whole issue.

Killaroo
9th Dec 2013, 05:19
Know quite a number of guys from Northern Ireland who avail of legal opportunity to have both Irish and British passports.


Racedo - as a dual passport holder I know there's one major snag with your proposal. When you enter these countries they stamp your passport. When you leave they stamp you out, after checking the inbound stamp.
If you present your 'back-up' passport (with no entry stamp) you may be arrested.
If you've figured out a way around that, I'm all ears.

ThereISlifeafterQF
10th Dec 2013, 04:08
I once had a senior position with an operator that needed someone to fill the role rather quickly, as the previous bloke was about to leave and they had been unsuccessful with their recruiting (nationwide). They accepted my request for remuneration that was quite a chunk above my current employer, so I felt obliged to accept (well sort of, in a mercenary way). When I started I soon realised that the situation was far less rosie than I had been told, and they were under the watchful eye of the regulator.

I knew that the situation would not improve in any realistic (or achievable !) timeframe as the much needed changes / improvements were not going to be resourced by upper management, so I figured I would be leaving in the not-too-distant future anyway. Unfortunately my contract required a three month notice period, though I was still on probation...... (and to leave before the three months notice period were up after probation was passed it would be ME having to pay THEM). I ended up handing in my resignation at 1645 on the last day of probation (bugger-all notice required then !)...... A long meeting followed next morning, and promises of changes to the terms of employment - including notice period - which all happened - just to keep me there.

Only a few weeks later I handed my notice in (properly) and I was out for good, and as it turns out I had already been approached to return to work with a good bunch of guys that I had worked with previously - and I was still given a going away party by the old mob !

I know that some other people there that had to go right to the end of the three months, in which time management just made their time at work painful......

cattletruck
10th Dec 2013, 05:35
When the going gets tough the tough go shopping, trust me it works, well most of the time :ouch:.

One time when that didn't work was when I was at this cancer charity organisation when it slowly became apparent that things were not quite what they seemed. Although they marketed themselves as desperately poor they were actually rolling in cash and had trouble concealing it, in fact the three directors who hadn't worked anywhere else owned multi-million dollar properties in exclusive parts of town. But that wasn't the worst of it. One of these directors, best described as a pompous old hag, had a fetish for surrounding herself with homosexuals. The poor mail room boy who was married with kids used to cop a fair amount of psychological abuse from her fairies. He got them all back one day by putting up a poster on the wall of a topless blonde with huge boobs. They didn't get rid of him probably because he was gullible enough to keep on taking the abuse. The second director was in charge of behavioural research and was as thick as sh!t. Talking to him was like talking to your dentist. I reckon he was running psychological experiments on his own staff, perhaps there was more to the copious supply of free tea and biscuits in his section. The third director was an over opinionated and overly precious [email protected] with both a clinical and ghoulish fascination of dead and dying people. He was trying to make snow with three aircon units in his office in addition to the buildings aircon. Turns out they were actually a closet homo organisation behind a charity organisation facade. Proof of this was found in an accidentally intercepted e-mail of a pending lesbian hot tub orgy - the names on that list, who would have thought :eek:.

Lucky for me I was being poached by another company just when it was getting all too depressing to bare. I literally walked out of this gig and into the other.

racedo
10th Dec 2013, 10:59
Racedo - as a dual passport holder I know there's one major snag with your proposal. When you enter these countries they stamp your passport. When you leave they stamp you out, after checking the inbound stamp.
If you present your 'back-up' passport (with no entry stamp) you may be arrested.
If you've figured out a way around that, I'm all ears.

I was told yacht trip where meet someone from a neighbouring country in a boat and just get on wrong boat or get on visiting boat that was leaving. Now don't know real logistics of it but guys seemed quite clear it was option in a worst case scenario.

racedo
10th Dec 2013, 11:13
Friend who had decided to return to home country worked for a Pharma company.
New job lined up and approx dates ready, house sold etc.
Old boss point blank refused to accept resignation, told friend to keep mouth shut and say nowt especially to HR.

As Pharma companies get drugs turned down all the time this was a situation where they had quite a number where trails were not going to end up with new drugs on market.

Week after latest drugs turned down lots of redundancies announced.

Boss called friend in to break the tearful sad news they were being made redundant, 3 months paid notice plus 12 years service at x weeks were going to be paid. Course they could appeal against it all with HR advising...........boss gave Oscar winning performance it seems.

Leaving do 2 weeks later I attended and collared the boss and said rumour was he up for an Oscar, pissed himself laughing.
He just said friend was always loyal even when sent to do impossible tasks, yup everybody knew of going back home but he figured given company was spending X million firing people then he should look after people.
Friend went with equivalent of over a years net pay................nice way to leave.