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Krystal n chips
28th Nov 2013, 05:22
An easy item to lose........

BBC News - Family appeal to find 'third Birmingham pub bomb' (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-25126142)

I like the comment further on, about the Birmingham Six not being mentally capable of carrying out the bombings.

This would be in contrast to West Mids, " less than finest" deductive prowess would it ?.

Anyway, if anybody should find the missing bomb, I am sure that when you plonk it on the reception desk at any Police station in the West Midlands, the force will be eternally grateful.

500N
28th Nov 2013, 05:32
I remember that well because I used to walk close to it to school.

And remember the Bombs when they went off.


I can't remember but was it one of the other two bombs that
put the crack in the staircase of the Bull Ring centre building ?

500N
28th Nov 2013, 05:41
Christ, this made me look at my old school on a map,
glad to see some things haven't changed !

Playing fields still as they were, a few additions.

bosnich71
28th Nov 2013, 07:03
500N ...... what was your old school ?

Lightning Mate
28th Nov 2013, 07:43
It was approved.......:E

bosnich71
28th Nov 2013, 09:16
Lightning ..... " it was approved", very droll, I like it. .

500N
28th Nov 2013, 09:26
LM, thank you for that :p :O
Nice to know who your mates are ! :}

Bosnich

Hallfield School, Church Road, Edgbaston

racedo
28th Nov 2013, 10:19
I like the comment further on, about the Birmingham Six not being mentally capable of carrying out the bombings.

This would be in contrast to West Mids, " less than finest" deductive prowess would it ?.

Anyway, if anybody should find the missing bomb, I am sure that when you plonk it on the reception desk at any Police station in the West Midlands, the force will be eternally grateful.

WMP had the bomb and lost it................or lets face it made sure it was lost because it would prove they and Frank Skuse lied through their teeth.

Many years ago met a retired WMP senior officer who was in Police Intelligence in late 70's, he was disparaging about quality of personnel and said many were worse than what they were chasing.
Apparently WM Serious Crime Squad was disbanded not because they were bent, (that was a given in most crime squads it appears).
But alledgedly because the Chief Constable of WMP thought he was in line for RUC job, when he didn't get it they had a big party to celebrate and mocked him as they had done for a long time. He needed revenge.

Seldomfitforpurpose
28th Nov 2013, 11:40
So 500 is actually a Pom, apologies if that is not news to one and all but it is to me 👍👍👍🍻🍻🍻

bosnich71
28th Nov 2013, 12:10
500N ...... Edgbaston no less, very posh,well one end was at least.
Mine was Waverley Road Grammar, Small Heath. Not very posh but, at the time, they were one of only two Grammar schools in Birmingham which played football rather than that other game with a funny shaped ball, Kings Norton grammar being the other one. The school is still there but is now called something else .. thanks to the progressives in the British labour Party .... and there is a ginormous mosque next door which rather takes the shine off the old Victorian building next to it.
I used to use one of the pubs that received the attentions of the Irish blokes, mainly on match day lunchtimes. Without getting into any arguments about guilt or otherwise of the six or however many there was involved didn't some of them, at least, catch the boat back to Northern Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the bombings to attend the funeral of the geezer who blew himself up with his own bomb in Coventry that week so they did have some connection with the IRA.
Given that the police officer in the BBC article stated that there was a known active ( ! ) IRA unit in the Ladywood area why didn't the British army/police sort them out at the time.
One thing is for sure is that amongst the dead were some teenage lads from the South, Eire that is.

500N
28th Nov 2013, 14:58
SFFP

You can't be very observant. For years my location under my name was "UK, then Australia" or along those lines until I changed it a few months ago.

500N
28th Nov 2013, 15:10
Bosnich

I remember the name Kings Norton School but not your one.
I played Rugby although I noticed on the aerial photo of the playing fields
a soccer pitch now !!!

Funny isn't it, we go to school a few kms from each other and 40 years later
we live a few kms from each other on the other side of the world.
We should catch up for a chat.

Re posh, didn't know it was, I think it was more convenience as
my father worked at Witton for ICI / IMI. The aviation link is that
he was on the team in the 1950's that perfected how to produce
titanium on a commercial basis and of course this lead to it's use
in aircraft and aircraft engines.

FYI, I lived in Shenstone, near Lichfield. A long way to school in the winter !!!

racedo
28th Nov 2013, 19:25
I used to use one of the pubs that received the attentions of the Irish blokes, mainly on match day lunchtimes. Without getting into any arguments about guilt or otherwise of the six or however many there was involved didn't some of them, at least, catch the boat back to Northern Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the bombings to attend the funeral of the geezer who blew himself up with his own bomb in Coventry that week so they did have some connection with the IRA.

Er no they knew the person concerned or his family.

Once asked some Irish friends about big funerals in Ireland and they were clear that if they knew someone or someones family then they would go to the funeral. In very few cases would they not go but they said it was a cultural thing that over time had reduced as people go less. Their parents would definitely have gone to more funerals than they ever did.

Their position was they were going as a mark of respect either to him/her and their family and what other people think was largely irrelevant.

One guy who was a builder had just come back from Ireland where a sub contractor he had worked with 2 years before had died leaving young family in Ireland. He had drank with guy a few times but said not friends but he and others had gone across. Told that family member of deceased said to him that "seeing so many people come across from UK showed how he was liked and a comfort to the family".

It is a cultural thing that I kind of understand but know that most people in UK don't, then again I talked into going with Irish guy to funeral of colleagues parent, we only people from work there. He commented that in Ireland he would have expected lots of people from work, that is what is done there to show respect to the working colleague.

bosnich71
29th Nov 2013, 05:16
Racedo .... it may well be a cultural thing but ......

a bloke in Coventry blows himself up with his own bomb. Presumably he had some attachment to the cause even if, as with most it seems, he was not an active member he must have been a sympathiser.
His remains are shipped off back to Belfast for an IRA backed funeral.
Two bombs go off in Birmingham city centre pubs both of which are in close proximity to the railway station in New Street. The Mulberry Bush pub was actually in New Street and the other was on the bottom floor of the Rotunda building again 5 minutes walk from the station
Six Irish blokes, one of whom at least, later admits to pro Republican leanings, are drinking at the station before catching a train to board a ferry to Northern Ireland where they going to attend the funeral of the aforementioned bomber.
Feelings are running high in the Midlands and, for once, the British were getting wound up and there was a distinct chance of bloodshed being directed toward the Irish population in Britain.
No wonder the Plods got excited.
At this time I was living in Coventry and working in Birmingham. It was quite common to have collections being made by Irishmen in pubs in both cities on behalf of the IRA. There was also a Sinn Fein information office in the city centre. I don't think that either would have gone too far in Southern Ireland or parts of Derry etc. for that matter.
It may have been a cultural thing, I don't know.What I thought at the time was that the b*****s were IRA and I wondered why the law wasn't sorting them out.

Krystal n chips
29th Nov 2013, 06:24
" No wonder the Plods got excited."

Is that a new term for gross miscarriage of justice perchance ?....to save you asking..yes, I was around at the time, working for the Gov't in a slightly oil stained and only a fleeting encounter with an iron, blue suit.

However, I am still, as indeed will most people I presume, intrigued as to how, allegedly, the force in question managed to lose.....a bomb.

bosnich71
30th Nov 2013, 05:14
Krystal ......... "how the force in question managed to lose a bomb" ?
Easy the Force I was once a member of managed to lose quite a few..... 25 lb. smoke and flash usually.
Google "The Prussian Queen" for a laugh.
Hansard for November 18th.1953. gives some details of bombs lost etc.

bosnich71
30th Nov 2013, 05:20
500N .... I remember Shenstone. I also used to ride a bike that way but in the opposite direction, lived in Castle Bromwich ..... when it was still a village .... through Coleshill, Kingsbury, Tamworth, Shenstone, Sutton and home again. Not to school though trying to get fit.
Didn't do me much use though. :sad:

500N
30th Nov 2013, 05:29
Christ, you were keen :O

My parents have just got back from the last trip they are likely to make
to the UK and traveled all over visiting friends etc.

PM sent.

Standard Noise
30th Nov 2013, 17:22
Once asked some Irish friends about big funerals in Ireland and they were clear that if they knew someone or someones family then they would go to the funeral.
Their position was they were going as a mark of respect either to him/her and their family and what other people think was largely irrelevant.

Yep, that about sums it up.

It is a cultural thing that I kind of understand but know that most people in UK don't, That much has become obvious from others' posts here.

so they did have some connection with the IRA.
And that proves the points above. They didn't have to be connected to the IRA to attend a funeral, in some areas, it would have been expected by the very people you are associating them with and often, under an implied threat that should they not show their respect for the 'cause', they and their own families could have bee viewed as traitors. That's not to say they weren't attending purely out of respect for the family of the deceased anyway. Of course there's always the bonus of having a few days off work and the chance to catch up with family and old friends.

racedo
30th Nov 2013, 18:49
a bloke in Coventry blows himself up with his own bomb. Presumably he had some attachment to the cause even if, as with most it seems, he was not an active member he must have been a sympathiser.
His remains are shipped off back to Belfast for an IRA backed funeral.
Two bombs go off in Birmingham city centre pubs both of which are in close proximity to the railway station in New Street. The Mulberry Bush pub was actually in New Street and the other was on the bottom floor of the Rotunda building again 5 minutes walk from the station
Six Irish blokes, one of whom at least, later admits to pro Republican leanings, are drinking at the station before catching a train to board a ferry to Northern Ireland where they going to attend the funeral of the aforementioned bomber.
Feelings are running high in the Midlands and, for once, the British were getting wound up and there was a distinct chance of bloodshed being directed toward the Irish population in Britain.
No wonder the Plods got excited.
At this time I was living in Coventry and working in Birmingham. It was quite common to have collections being made by Irishmen in pubs in both cities on behalf of the IRA. There was also a Sinn Fein information office in the city centre. I don't think that either would have gone too far in Southern Ireland or parts of Derry etc. for that matter.
It may have been a cultural thing, I don't know.What I thought at the time was that the b*****s were IRA and I wondered why the law wasn't sorting them out.

Cops knew they had the wrong people but decided they couldn't be bothered to look so beat the crap out of the guys they had.
Now state supported this by covering up and letting people who did it off scot free. Dennings "Appaling Vista" to find these men not connected summed it up even more.
Knowing you have the wrong people and keeping them in jail while covering up the evidence should have resulted in people being jailed.

People got away with this because bent coppers didn't do their jobs.

Cops losing a bomb not a shock as what I was told that the correct handshake was a good promotion method in WMP, valued well above competence.

racedo
30th Nov 2013, 19:16
And that proves the points above. They didn't have to be connected to the IRA to attend a funeral, in some areas, it would have been expected by the very people you are associating them with and often, under an implied threat that should they not show their respect for the 'cause', they and their own families could have bee viewed as traitors. That's not to say they weren't attending purely out of respect for the family of the deceased anyway. Of course there's always the bonus of having a few days off work and the chance to catch up with family and old friends.

Must admit I did question how would you know if someone attended an Irish funeral, Irish guy said nobody would if its a big one.
If you made a public point of stating it and bragging about it then maybe some comment back, seen as lack of respect for the family.