PDA

View Full Version : Things that just faded away.....


SpringHeeledJack
24th Nov 2013, 15:03
I was watching an original episode of Dr Who (a UK icon to those from elsewhere) today as it's the 50th anniversary of it's inauguration and seems to be everywhere on the gogglebox at the moment. Anyhow, one of the characters was wearing a Donkey Jacket Donkey jacket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donkey_jacket) and I was suddenly reminded that I hadn't seen one for many years and hadn't noticed the fact that I hadn't. Since perhaps the 1930's the Donkey Jacket was the ubiquitous outdoor wear for perhaps everyone in a manual job. I remember them still in the 1990's and then.....everyone seemed to stop wearing them and they faded away without fanfare.



SHJ

arcniz
24th Nov 2013, 15:15
Ditto a large fraction of the high-rated investments one has indulged over a long span.

tony draper
24th Nov 2013, 15:21
Sheepskin Coats early seventies, a sign of achieving higher rank on the building sites,means you had left your toolbox at home and now carried a clipboard or site drawings.
:rolleyes:

Windy Militant
24th Nov 2013, 15:24
Wore mine yesterday to hang out the washing!:ok:

I suspect that the arrival of modern waterproof clothing that doesn't smell like a wet dog contributed to the demise of the good old DJ. That and the arrival of the mini digger. ;)

You don't seem to see the tin lunch box with a hinged lid these days.

SpringHeeledJack
24th Nov 2013, 15:28
Wore mine yesterday to hang out the washing!

I suspect that the arrival of modern waterproof clothing that doesn't smell like a wet dog contributed to the demise of the good old DJ. That and the arrival of the mini digger.

You don't seem to see the tin lunch box with a hinged lid these days.

Good to see someone keeping the faith ;) Regarding the lunchboxes, all the metrosexual builders swear by Cafe Latte and muffins these days :{


SHJ

ZOOKER
24th Nov 2013, 15:30
Donkey Jackets were replaced by 'PPE', i.e. Hard-hats and Hi-Viz.
How the hell did we build Stonehenge, The Pyramids St, Pauls and The Forth Bridge without them?
And those little metal fence panels that now keep miscreants away from 'holes on the road' etc.

vulcanised
24th Nov 2013, 16:30
Those holes in the road always seem to have traffic lights by them too.

Time was when they were always attended by a chap having to stop and go in the middle of the road http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/embarass.gif

SpringHeeledJack
24th Nov 2013, 17:13
Bernard Cribbins Hole In The Ground - YouTube


SHJ

treadigraph
24th Nov 2013, 18:54
all the metrosexual builders swear by Cafe Latte and muffins these days

Enjoying an excellent Full English in a café a few days ago, most bemused to see several well-built bloke in builders garb march in and to a man (?) order a panini and latte each. I half expected a chorus of "YMCA" while they were waiting...

Lon More
24th Nov 2013, 19:01
Almost 50 years on from the original and still going strong

Rolling Stones - Not Fade Away - Live _95 Tokyo Dome. - YouTube

reynoldsno1
24th Nov 2013, 22:31
Err, actually 56 years on from the original by the Crickets ...:8

onetrack
24th Nov 2013, 22:39
Solid leather Gladstone bags. Remember when every working laddie, tradesman, or railwayman, carried his lunch and drinks in a Gladstone bag?

As ubiquitious as brown glass beer bottles. Then suddenly, they all just disappeared - replaced by polyethylene lunchboxes, and a huge variety of other alternatives.

http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NjAwWDgwMA==/$T2eC16hHJIEFHSCfOz(kBSMvlShZ(Q~~48_20.JPG

Tankertrashnav
24th Nov 2013, 22:40
Re donkey jackets - it may be something to do with the fact that all the donkeys in the country are now safely in sanctuaries, leading long, comfortable lives, so that there are now very few available to make jackets out of :}

West Coast
24th Nov 2013, 22:44
General Douglas MacArthur...



Suitcases you actually carry opposed to roll behind you. Saw one the other day at the airport held by an elderly gent. The bag was likely older than me, and I'm not young anymore.

500N
24th Nov 2013, 22:47
"Re donkey jackets - it may be something to do with the fact that all the donkeys in the country are now safely in sanctuaries, leading long, comfortable lives, so that there are now very few available to make jackets out of http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/badteeth.gif"

Tanker

Don't worry, we have plenty of the bloody things, can't get rid of them fast enough. They breed like flies so come and get some ;) :O

onetrack
24th Nov 2013, 22:50
Tankertrashnav - Are you sure, all the donkeys are in sanctuaries? I suspect many are still loose in the political arena, and posing as so-called leaders.
We have heard much braying from places such as Congress and Parliaments, that gives substantial backing to this belief.

Tankertrashnav
24th Nov 2013, 22:51
For goodness sake don't tell Mrs TTN or she'll be round like a shot with a horsebox!

500N
24th Nov 2013, 23:04
You'll need more than one (horsebox) :O

Suggest a 3 Trailered, 3 decked road train cattle transporter !!! :O

http://i39.tinypic.com/w9i8gi.jpg

G-CPTN
24th Nov 2013, 23:10
I see salami . . .

onetrack
24th Nov 2013, 23:19
I see the opening of Parliament .... :)

500N
24th Nov 2013, 23:27
The only reason someone rounded them up is because they worked out
Donkey's aren't too bad at keeping Wild dogs at bay (from the sheep).
Otherwise they are normally spread around the countryside, dead.
They, and Horses do tremendous damage to the land.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
24th Nov 2013, 23:59
It's a meeting of the General Staff, surely!

mikedreamer787
25th Nov 2013, 01:46
The Ink Spots faded away too after 1954.

rvwfLe6sLis

I didn't care much for those Brown Dots and 4 Tunes offshoots.

John Hill
25th Nov 2013, 06:18
Donkey jacket? Pfffffttt!


Original style Swandri hooded woolen jacket for the outdoors man...
http://www.teara.govt.nz/files/p15647odt.jpg

500N
25th Nov 2013, 06:21
Yes, Swandri, good gear :ok:

Although I still have my Barbour from the UK !

handsfree
25th Nov 2013, 07:47
I've not seen one of these knocking about for a long while either

http://i829.photobucket.com/albums/zz216/poodlejumpy/ENAMLE-TEA-CAN_zpsa3911971.jpg

500N
25th Nov 2013, 09:16
I think you can still buy them here.

I use an enamel coffee pot / kettle on a Camp fire.

Must say that modern "enamel" is not nearly as good as old enamel.

AtomKraft
25th Nov 2013, 09:33
What happened to Ford Cortinas?

500N
25th Nov 2013, 09:37
Died a suitable death but not quite fast enough !

ExXB
25th Nov 2013, 09:42
English Cricket ...???

603DX
25th Nov 2013, 09:48
The wearing of hats by men has virtually faded away, long before the donkey jackets. Look at any of the old photos of crowds, like those often posted by Tony Draper, and almost every man has a hat on. Social class seemed to influence the choice of hat type, with top hats for the toffs, "pork pies" or trilbies for the middle classes, and flat caps for the workers. In summer, the more raffish types might wear a straw boater instead of their winter wear.

I still have a navy blue donkey jacket in the loft, acquired during my time spent on construction sites in the sixties and seventies, but am unlikely to ever wear it again in preference to either of my two Barbour jackets. I doubt if any of the charity shops would be interested, but maybe putting it into one of those re-cycling "clothing banks" would be sensible.

P.S. The OP mentioned the "Dr Who" phenomenon as a UK icon. Perhaps the ability of UK TV viewers to follow the normal course of growing up from youth into adulthood has also "faded away"? I cannot believe that the BBC's constant over-hyping of a programme designed for children has apparently succeeded in "infantalising" large sections of the adult population! Do the same brainwashed folk still watch "Blue Peter", as well?

Lightning Mate
25th Nov 2013, 09:59
Hang on to it.

They are bound to come back into fashion again at some point, as so many things have done in the past.

Sir Niall Dementia
25th Nov 2013, 12:42
onetrack;


I bought a stunning Gladstone bag in Venice recently, it cost £134 and I can get a weeks kit in it, the design was always perfect for purpose.


I've been trying to buy a suitcase without wheels ever since those w###ers at Terminal 5 lost mine some tears ago, I can't get one anywhere. Mine was a Samsonite and was perfect for two weeks away for one person.


Anybody who can point me in the direction of such a thing will receive my huge thanks.


SND

Metro man
25th Nov 2013, 13:03
These were quite common during the 1970s, even had one myself.

http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Mens-Vintage-Lumberjack-Jacket-40-42-chest-Red-and-White-Plaid-Check-/00/s/MTMxNlgxNjAw/z/5ZIAAMXQlUNRMpKi/$T2eC16NHJGwE9n)ySfb8BRMpKi3SLg~~60_35.JPG

cockney steve
25th Nov 2013, 14:50
@ Sir Niall - The basic fibreboard "Globetrotter " -simple and functional, is still available....unfortunately, it's being peddled as a "style-Icon" at what is, to me, eye-watering prices.

back in my Repping, sample-carrying days, I had over a dozen, wedged into a Maxi, later a Cortina estate..they did over 100,000 miles in my custody, manhandled into and out of hotels and show venues, on and off trains and ferries.....apart from one leather handle wearing through (that case was overloaded with heavy glass ashtrays wrapped in copious yellow dusters) they survived the abuse remarkably unscathed.

I would look for a local auction house that does regular house-clearance sales....you are bound to pick up a Gladstone /Globetrotter /real leather suitcase for under a fiver.

G&T ice n slice
25th Nov 2013, 15:02
the word "Maudling".

or possibly it didn't fade away but just became almost totally obscured...

G-CPTN
25th Nov 2013, 15:12
He died (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reginald_Maudling). . . .

Tankertrashnav
25th Nov 2013, 15:38
I bought a stunning Gladstone bag in Venice recently, it cost £134 and I can get a weeks kit in it, the design was always perfect for purpose.





I would look for a local auction house that does regular house-clearance sales....you are bound to pick up a Gladstone /Globetrotter /real leather suitcase for under a fiver.


Could've saved £129 there, Sir Niall :{

beaufort1
25th Nov 2013, 15:44
Whistling, people don't seem to whistle anymore. ;)

SpringHeeledJack
25th Nov 2013, 16:29
Whistling, people don't seem to whistle anymore.

Wow!.......How true, all the budding Roger Whittakers are lain silent these days. Most likely due to the emergence of multiple electronic devices that sap the imagination and anyway it's something yer grandad did through his dentures. ;)



SHJ

vulcanised
25th Nov 2013, 16:38
Whistling, people don't seem to whistle anymore


It's probably illegal. (and I wish I was joking)

G-CPTN
25th Nov 2013, 16:56
It's probably illegal.I believe that wolf-whistling (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/9369145/Wolf-whistles-silenced.html) is considered an offence.

Sunnyjohn
25th Nov 2013, 18:59
Enamel mugs, all chipped and with a blue rim. You can still get 'em!
http://silodrome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Enamel-Mug.png You made navvy team in a chipped enamel mug. You put one spoonful each of condensed milk, tea and sugar in it and pour on boiling water, Hey presto - navvy tea. And you filter the tea leaves through the gaps in your teeth - couldn't afford dentists in those days.

tony draper
25th Nov 2013, 19:44
I was a great whistler in me sproghood,then I ran away to sea,there whistling was beaten out of me with many a cuff along the earole and threat of being flung over the side, a word of wisdom to young prooners also thinking of running away to sea,do not whistle,do not whistle at sea under any circumstances.
:uhoh:

500N
25th Nov 2013, 19:46
And I still drink out of them.

A mate of mine has two huge Light green ones with black rim, all chipped
plus numerous smaller white one's. Coffee tastes great out of them and yes,
he has condensed milk in his :ok:

Lonewolf_50
25th Nov 2013, 20:00
Speaking of Fading away, we have

The British Empire
The American Industrial Base
Germans (negative breeding habits will do that over time ...)

SpringHeeledJack
25th Nov 2013, 20:26
In days of yore when Theatres were lit by gaslight, a whistling sound would indicate a leak soon to be followed by an explosion. There is therefore a long standing in some thespian quarters that equates whistling with bad luck and akin to putting a jinx on a production. Very luvvy! :p



SHJ

Worrals in the wilds
25th Nov 2013, 22:27
Interesting SHJ, I hadn't heard that one. :8

Whistling in a theatre is certainly a big no-no; the explanation I was told was that the flymen used to use whistle signals to fly scenery in and out, and if you whistled you were likely to cop either a curtain or a sack of counterweight in the head :ouch:.

These days everyone has a headset and can talk to the Stage Manager directly, but there's no reason to dispense with tradition just because the gas lights have gone and the whistling cue system's obselete. It wouldn't be theatre if people got rid of stuff just because it wasn't relevant any more. :}

Enamel mugs, all chipped and with a blue rim. You can still get 'em!They're a popular souvenir item in outback towns, in various colours and with the town's name or local attraction printed on the front. When travelling I collect them for my mother :\.

500N
25th Nov 2013, 22:31
Worrals

I never knew that.

I could give you some that are still in use in the NT that
have been everywhere and through multiple cyclones !!!

I'll find one (or at least look for one) up NT way with a toad or a
Buffalo on it and send it to you for your mum :ok:

I think my parents even have the original one's they used
to use in the UK that came out with us. I know we still use
the plates and they were definitely 50's or 60's vintage ;)

John Hill
25th Nov 2013, 22:38
You need one of these to go in the wooden box with those enamel mugs!
http://www.kiwiingenuity.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/magnum_thermette.gif

Once common in this country, even claimed to have been 'invented' here but the principle is at least as old as the samovar.

Worrals in the wilds
25th Nov 2013, 22:41
That's very kind. :) She also has a number of 1950s ones that were/are used for picnics.

Wow John, I've never seen one of those! What fuel do they use?

onetrack
25th Nov 2013, 22:44
SND - A hunderd and therty four quid for a Gladstone!! :eek: Good heavens man! - don't you realise, they were only twenty five shillings just before WW1?! :rolleyes:

The name has unfortunately been allocated to modern bags that are not Gladstones in the true sense of the description, as many modern Gladstones do not feature the metal framework that identifies a proper Gladstone.

The Gladstone even warrants a mention in Wikipedia .. Gladstone bag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gladstone_bag)

I'm amused to see in the old papers, just how much Gladstone bags featured in police and court reports. Many were purloined, and the offenders were usually collared within a short time, having to proffer a suitable explanation as to how they came into possession of said bag.
Many an "offender" was collared, and then protestingly offered up an acceptable explanation, that they had merely grabbed the wrong bag in haste. This explanation was quite often accepted by the beak, if suitable supporting evidence was given.

Gladstone bags often featured in short entertainment stories in the old publications, with the Gladstone offering up the mystery part of the story by leaving readers guessing as to what it had contained.
A Gladstone bag even featured in the story of a "penniless" recluse who died in 1952 in a NY apartment - with the then equivalent of £112,600 being found in his Gladstone bag, after his body was discovered.

The case of one missing Gladstone bag in 1888 - that was handed to a railway porter for stowage, and which then disappeared - went to the highest court in the realm, the Law Lords - whereby they made a far-reaching decision that all luggage handed to railway employees, then made the railway company fully responsible for any subsequent losses associated with any theft of that luggage.
Thus, one stolen humble Gladstone and its determined owners who sought suitable recompense, did a great service to the travelling public, by deciding this important facet of current law. :)

The Gladstone bag in historical news - Digitised newspapers and more - Trove (http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=Gladstone+bag)

John Hill
25th Nov 2013, 22:50
Worrals, they will burn whatever you can find to drop down the chimney, sticks and twigs are usually good enough but if you are lazy you can take a tin can tightly stuffed with rags onto which you pour kerosene then light it up and place the thermette over it. The draught up the chimney encourages the fire and gets a surprisingly clean burn.

onetrack
25th Nov 2013, 22:54
Mr Draper - as seafaring was the greatest harbourer of the strongest superstitions, I was under the impression that whistling in a seafaring environment, was reputed to bring forth storms?

YORKSHIRE: SAILING SUPERSTITIONS (http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cetag/5bseadal.htm)

500N
25th Nov 2013, 22:56
Worrals
Can't promise anything but I'll look. I gather they are sold in "touristy" shops
so I'll try and stop off and run into a few on my travels NT way. Back mid Jan.


John
The Army used a bigger version with internal burner,
you had to light it a certain way or else "woosh" ;) :O

Tankertrashnav
25th Nov 2013, 23:00
Tony and onetrack - I learned that when I was on a week's "adventure training" as a nav student. We went on a sailing course on an old 60' yawl, and as an inveterate whistler I was always getting grief from the skipper.

However on the last day when we were taking part in a race, as we were all on the starting line, or thereabouts, I could hear whistling all around. I asked the skipper about this and he said that as it was a calm day people were "whistling up the wind".

I suppose the trick is to only whistle until you've got enough wind, and then stop!

Hydromet
25th Nov 2013, 23:48
Those enamel mugs are good for more than just a cuppa. As a kid, one of my favourite breakfasts was 'egg in a mug'. Egg + milk, lightly beaten in the mug, placed on a low flame or coals. When it rises to the top of the mug, it's cooked.

500N
25th Nov 2013, 23:53
Hydro

Yes, when feeling lazy I do the same now but with a glass jug and
the Microwave. I sometimes add a bit of cheese, tastes great :ok:

Worrals in the wilds
26th Nov 2013, 00:56
Not to worry 500N, you probably won't have room with all the buffalo meat you'll be bringing back. ;)

Thanks John, interesting.

500N
26th Nov 2013, 01:01
" Not to worry 500N, you probably won't have room with all the buffalo meat you'll be bringing back. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif"

:O

You should have seen the look on the scanner operators face when
I placed my back pack hand luggage on the belt. A Solid 30+kg of
frozen meat and he didn't know what it was except it was solid and
black on the screen.

One of these days I reckon they or the airline will knock it back as
hand luggage !!!

Solid Rust Twotter
26th Nov 2013, 07:05
Enamel mugs, all chipped and with a blue rim. You can still get 'em!


Pretty easy to find out here. Many folks still use them. I keep an old ammo box full of overnight camping gear in my pickup just in case. Got a set of enamel table goods in it along with the usual stuff. I also use a couple of half gallon enamel mugs for bush cooking instead of the usual billies and dixies. Makes a great cuppa on a cold day and it's convenient to put down your fly rod and stroll across to a small fire you have going to take a sip from your cuppa stewing alongside.

500N
26th Nov 2013, 07:09
SRT

You make me want to pack up and head out bush :O

One thing about enamel items. They don't bloody melt !!!

Takan Inchovit
26th Nov 2013, 07:47
Anybody seen a Telex machine lately? You could look like a real slick typist by using the optional perforated tape thingy on the side.


80's TELEX machine - YouTube (http://youtu.be/9nHfztP9Qqs)

alisoncc
26th Nov 2013, 07:57
Still got a duffel coat hanging in the wardrobe. Now those with a Uni scarf were all the rage when I had ceased to be an ankle biter.

500N
26th Nov 2013, 08:03
Still have a long white scarf in one of the drawers. Not sure I'll ever wear it.

ORAC
26th Nov 2013, 08:05
http://leemartinauthor.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/SlideRule.jpg

http://com.magicstudio.production.s3.amazonaws.com/scaled_images/image_files/000/004/532/original.jpg?1285702441

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/attachments/general-chit-chat/1080426d1382548920-vintage-xerox-machines-old-copy-machine.jpg

barry lloyd
26th Nov 2013, 08:05
The comptometer and with it, the comptometer operator.

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSQHHo-ARURv1SHVx3Zjr_u-9o1U4Cxo1ftNS7aPGCv4seYPrhfjg

I remember working with one lady whose fingers used to fly over the keys and she very rarely made any mistakes.

barry lloyd
26th Nov 2013, 08:08
ORAC:

The abacus is still in use in the more rural areas of Russia, though it is slowly disappearing.

RJM
26th Nov 2013, 08:46
How stolidly, stoically Russian - clicking away on those abacuses while the very land sinks from beneath their feet.

On a visit to London in 1984 I saw quite a few 'city gents' complete with bowler hats. On my next visit, in 1996, I saw not one.

Where did they go?

AtomKraft
26th Nov 2013, 08:50
RJM,

There are plenty of folks who could advise them where to go these days.

MagnusP
26th Nov 2013, 08:59
RJM, bowlers are still around. Apart from the City, they're prominent at orange/loyalist parades (maybe an ex-army association?) and I see a few around Edinburgh in legal circles as well as financial.

Talking about "not fade away", I see Sir Mick is going to be a great-grandfather. :eek:

SpringHeeledJack
26th Nov 2013, 09:17
Anybody seen a Telex machine lately?

No, but I remember having business dealings with a Telex bureau in the 80's where communicating with the 2 staff was difficult due to the sound of 25 Telex machines buzzing away almost non-stop 24/7, the noise was quite extraordinary! Health and Safety was not yet in place, I'm sure that they'd have had hearing loss from that environment.

On a visit to London in 1984 I saw quite a few 'city gents' complete with bowler hats. On my next visit, in 1996, I saw not one.

Where did they go?

Bingo, another grand example! Obviously things go out of fashion, sartorially speaking, but was it due to the older 'city gents' retiring and the younger chaps not wanting to look like the old boys, or did everyone just decide, en masse to dispense with said head wear as it was deemed silly, or inappropriate ?



SHJ

500N
26th Nov 2013, 09:24
"en masse to dispense with said head wear as it was deemed silly, or inappropriate ?"

An article in the paper here the other day about ties dying out.

Even some of our big company CEO's have given up wearing them
for some of the time including the odd press conference. No one thinks
less of them. They still "spruce up" for the AGM, visits to London etc
but I think practicality has overtaken wearing something for no reason
- like a white shirt, tie and suit on a mine site !!!!

Worrals in the wilds
26th Nov 2013, 09:33
Anybody seen a Telex machine lately? You could look like a real slick typist by using the optional perforated tape thingy on the side.
And the DX! Anything urgent went 'on the DX'. Apparently it still exists.
https://www.tollpriority.com.au/portal/page/portal/TOLL_PRIORITY/Home/Services/DocumentsMail/DXMail
No, but I remember having business dealings with a Telex bureau in the 80's where communicating with the 2 staff was difficult due to the sound of 25 Telex machines buzzing away almost non-stop 24/7, the noise was quite extraordinary!

I recall visiting my grandfather at work (when I was very small) and seeing the soundproofed, double glazed typing room. Inside were a group of women in full sized hearing protectors (airport style), typing away at full speed with cigarettes in the ashtrays beside them. :cool:

Tankertrashnav
26th Nov 2013, 09:43
Bowlers are still worn by cavalry officers in civvies on their big parades, such as Remembrance Sunday. Here's a picture of Prince Harry and friends on some such occasion

History of the Bowler Hat - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8045026/History-of-the-Bowler-Hat.html)

The article has some history of the hat, which is called a derby by the cousins, of course.

Re ties - I've got a wardrobe full of the things which I rarely wear as I'm normally in scruff order these days, but I still think that a man wearing a smart suit with an open necked shirt looks as though he's forgotten to put his tie on - but I guess that's just an age thing.

Solid Rust Twotter
26th Nov 2013, 09:45
Used to send the met reports from the Antarctic on radiotelex. Type them up on the paper strip and leave it coiled up in a figure 8 on the machine for the radio bloke to send when he did his scheds.

G&T ice n slice
26th Nov 2013, 09:56
from memory

zczc xkf001
jfkzzyy yulzzyy
.lhrzzyy 131126

text
=




nnnn

but it was all a long time ago....

500N
26th Nov 2013, 09:58
You know one area that good dress, hats, ties etc has NOT died out
is the races. Even here in the colonies :O

Standards are maintained on race day in certain enclosures and areas
and people do put the effort in.

500N
26th Nov 2013, 10:00
"to send when he did his scheds."

Now that is a word I haven't heard for years, especially with modern comms
where you pick up a phone etc.

Scheds used to rule your life :O

Lightning Mate
26th Nov 2013, 10:02
I would never wear a suit without a tie.

.....and what about male "celebrities" who will wear an expensive jacket with jeans !!

STANDARDS

tony draper
26th Nov 2013, 10:02
When we were sprogs Bro Draper and me were mooching round some waste ground when hidden carefully under some bushes we found two strangely shaped leather cases,we opened same with trembling fingers as obviously these had been hidden in the olden days by pirates or highwaymen,nestling neatly within each was a Bowler Hat.
Oft wonder in later life what was the story behind these carefully hidden hats :uhoh:

lasernigel
26th Nov 2013, 10:05
Maybe it was this that led to the demise of the donkey jacket...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/lasernigel/donkeyjacket_zpsec10204d.jpg

SpringHeeledJack
26th Nov 2013, 10:22
You've put yer foot in it now! :p


SHJ

MagnusP
26th Nov 2013, 11:19
Nah; he's just "extracting the michael".

Rossian
26th Nov 2013, 11:23
....some time ago I was walking along Piccadilly with another guy sort of keeping pace with me. There, in the middle of the pavement, lay a patent leather shoe with no signs of wear on the sole and the lace tied in a neat double bow. I looked at him he looked at me and shrugged. After we'd plodded on for about another 100 yards, there was the other shoe of the pair, lying on its side with the same neat bow-tied lace. I looked at him, he looked at me, I said "there's probably the makings of a good short story there". He replied "it's probably a candid effin' camera ploy" shrugged and walked away. Some people have no souls(soles?)

The Ancient Mariner

PS are you sure Tony that they weren't cunningly disguised landmines laid by the Geordie Liberation Front?

G-CPTN
26th Nov 2013, 12:04
lay a patent leather shoe with no signs of wear on the sole and the lace tied in a neat double bow.
there was the other shoe of the pair, lying on its side with the same neat bow-tied lace.
Obviously the work of Hopalong Cassidy.

cockney steve
26th Nov 2013, 12:56
Shell-suits!!! mandatory dress for every chav and chavette.....suddenly all vanished

Siren-suits...reinvented as a "onesie" (a cringe-making appelation)
decorators in white "Bib and Brace"
Dustmen used to wear a stout leather waistcoat (nowadays a Gilet) as did the coalman.....both redundant as the coal sacks are much smaller and the bin is no longer emptied into a "skep" which was carried on the shoulder to the Dust-Cart.

G-CPTN
26th Nov 2013, 12:58
Bowler hats are still worn by the driver and flunkies of drays drawn by heavy horses:-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/outdoors/img/galleries/gallery031/4_w606_h341.jpg

simon brown
26th Nov 2013, 13:07
You never see white dog sh*te anymore....

Unless its on the pitch at an England v Brazil game of course

Ah the good old days when a dog could have a bone

SpringHeeledJack
26th Nov 2013, 14:41
Indeed mr brown, the dog poos would disintegrate quickly unlike the perma-poos of today that lay smeared in parks and on pavements waiting to pounce under the soles of innocent shoeware.



SHJ

500N
26th Nov 2013, 14:49
Ah, Simon, yes, "over fed" my dog bones one week and then
realised the DS was white for a few days !

Quickly changed the diet for a week.

G-CPTN
26th Nov 2013, 14:51
Apparently, commercial dog-food used to be bulked with bone-meal which persisted after the 'organic' components had decayed.

500N
26th Nov 2013, 14:58
Fair call.

I know if I feed mine fresh raw and cooked Kangaroo meat or Venison her whole
body changes, coat gets really shiny etc etc.

Then again, if you were given a big, fat juicy piece of meat ............ :O

SpringHeeledJack
26th Nov 2013, 18:16
Remembering phone numbers



SHJ

Nervous SLF
26th Nov 2013, 18:17
Anybody seen a Telex machine lately? You could look like a real slick typist by using the optional perforated tape thingy on the side.


80's TELEX machine - YouTube (http://youtu.be/9nHfztP9Qqs)

Lots of operators used to keep the paper chads and use it as confetti. Not a good idea though as it could get into peoples eyes.
It then became very awkward to remove as it merged with the fluid in the eye and so was difficult to find.
Another short read:-

The Telex Service (http://www.lightstraw.co.uk/ate/tass/telex1.html)

.

John Hill
26th Nov 2013, 18:53
Ah Telex, which of course was a service for commerce and was a dial up service if I recall. Telex was the service but the machines were 'teletypewriters' or 'teleprinters' depending on which half of the world you lived in.

The aviation world had extensive teletypewriter networks operated by airlines and various agencies including SITA and ICAO. The ICAO AFTN network was still using teletypewriters in some parts of the world until this century. BTW, some AFTN circuits were still operated on morse code until at least 1999 and maybe still are!

GrumpyOldFart
26th Nov 2013, 18:57
The little white dot in the middle of the screen when you switched your TV off...

PingDit
26th Nov 2013, 21:09
Donkey Jackets went the same way as:

Izal toilet paper
Fruit Polo's
Jubbly's
Zubes
Imps
Fruit Spangles
The lime barrel in the box of Milk Tray chocolates
Merry Maid ice lollies...

...and getting a head gasket change down to 35 minutes on my Mk IV Cortina.

G-CPTN
26th Nov 2013, 21:23
Dufflecoats (with wooden toggles) were different to donkey jackets.
There were camel-coloured ones (for art students) and navy ones (for sailors) and they had a hood.

Donkey jackets were mainly issued to workmen (roadmenders and the like) and they usually had 'waterproof' shoulder covering.

Windy Militant
26th Nov 2013, 21:34
Dufflecoats (with wooden toggles) were different to donkey jackets.
There were camel-coloured ones (for art students)

And MOD camera operators!

Mufax machines for weather maps.

Brown China tea pots.

500N
26th Nov 2013, 21:54
What about Maps.

You don't see people with nearly as many maps now as before.

I purchased a 1:25,000 map the other day, first time in years
and oh was it good looking at it !

John Hill
27th Nov 2013, 01:10
Sticking the steering wheel in the side of the tractor to get it started! (Long gone)

500N
27th Nov 2013, 01:53
Crank handle starting of motors - ie the Old L A N R R O V E R ;)

John Hill
27th Nov 2013, 02:22
But at least with the BlandDrover you didnt have to pump up the blow lamp and get the hot bulb glowing before addressing the crank!

500N
27th Nov 2013, 02:28
True. I know the early LR's were a bit agricultural but nothing like
some of the early Tractors.


The other thing - waiting for what was sometimes ages for the
glow lamp to go out on the LR.

John Hill
27th Nov 2013, 02:36
We had one tractor on the farm that used a cartridge to start, cartridges of course were 'special' and had to come from England and everyone along the way made a mark up. Once one was started my brothers and I would have to drive that thing 24 hours a day or until the job was done! I see those tractors at shows now and they seem so puny it is no wonder they seemed to take forever especially ploughing.

Loose rivets
27th Nov 2013, 03:26
True. I know the early LR's were a bit agricultural but nothing like
some of the early Tractors.

Huh?:confused:


The other thing - waiting for what was sometimes ages for the
glow lamp to go out on the LR.

Yes, that's what the wife used to say.:bored:

500N
27th Nov 2013, 03:34
Loose

Re Huh ?, John Hill answered it in the two posts before with good examples.