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Guptar
21st Nov 2013, 01:35
It's been 7 years since I bought my last new car. At the time I looked at all manner of paint protection products but settled on just old fashioned wax.

I just stared looking at products again but nothing has really changed. There are some high end coatings that are applied over the paint on Gulfstreams etc, costing many thousands of dollars. Is there anything new on the market that does really work. Some products claim they give a type of clear coast over the paint, effectively filling in the microscopic ridges and valleys of the paint.

My current strategy involves keeping the car out of the sun and regular washing and waxing.

500N
21st Nov 2013, 01:42
Gupta

Likewise, good old fashion wax and elbow grease.

Especially if someone buys a new car, I reckon putting a good couple of coatings
of wax on it before you start to use it builds a good base for the future.

Also agree re keeping it out of the sun as much as possible.

M.Mouse
21st Nov 2013, 01:52
A good friend of mine has a bodyshop. If these products were so long lasting and protected the paint from allowing contaminants to adhere to it then they would cause untold problems when trying to repaint a panel due to damage. They don't!

I know several people who have spent the not inconsiderable money that is charged for special paint protection treatments but none seem to think they make much difference.

Keeping a car clean and waxing regularly works but then most people don't bother looking after a car properly anyway judging from most of the stuff you see driving around!

jolihokistix
21st Nov 2013, 02:07
Red seems to fade fastest. The wife's car is pretty far gone on top and on the bonnet. I asked Honda how much they would charge for repainting just the roof and the bonnet and they said depending on the method used around 1,600 USD.:eek:

AtomKraft
21st Nov 2013, 02:36
Jolie

Usually it buffs up well. Get a body shop to put a mop on it.

I've seen paint that looked completely finished ( light pink for red) come straight back up with a good buffing.

cattletruck
21st Nov 2013, 03:32
1. New car dealers always put the thinnest coat of wax on a car to show up the finish.
2. Buy a $20 polymer glaze (fancy way of saying quality wax) and do your whole car using elbow grease (don't use a machine as new car paint is often still softish - you can run a fingernail through it in some places).
3. I call this the clear coat. It will protect your paint from bird poo stains, small scratches and minor scrubs.
4. With deeper scratches you can use methylated spirits to take the clear coat off and a cutting wax to "rub" out the scratch.
5. I only wax my car like this once a year. I sold one white car with 10 applications of clear coat (i.e 10 years old) to a dealer, and when his detailer took it all off the paint work was very impressive for something that sat outside most of its life.
6. Never get too precious about new cars, people often run into them and drive off when you go shopping.

A A Gruntpuddock
21st Nov 2013, 04:13
Many years ago my father in law bought a new car and paid to have a 'lifetime' protective coating applied so that he would never have to polish it again.

Unfortunately it was kept parked on a busy road and, whilst the nearside remained relatively clear, the offside looked as though it had been used for target practise.

Even a monthly application of polish would probably have sealed the damage to the paint and minimised the subsequent rusting.

Lancelot37
21st Nov 2013, 04:35
I've had about 24 cars over almost 58 years, many were company cars changed at 2 years. None were ever waxed or polished and were only washed at a car wash. They were all as good as new when sold.

Since retirement I've had a silver car for 9 years, never polished, and it still looks as good as new. It is parked in the drive over winter with no ill effect. I won't be a slave to a car. It's no more than a tin box with a wheel on each corner that goes from A to B. There's more to life especially at 76 years old before the wooden box arrives. I'll buy a new one in January and it'll never be polished. Most modern paints don't need it.

OK shoot me down if you need to.

MG23
21st Nov 2013, 04:49
OK shoot me down if you need to.

Modern paint (i.e. in the last few years) is crap.

I don't know when it changed, but our Civic has more paint chips at 25,000km than our mid-90s Buick has at 200,000. At the time we bought the Civic, we also considered a Subaru, and a lot of Subaru owners were complaining about the awful paint on their cars.

Tarq57
21st Nov 2013, 04:57
Just what I've learned, carnuba wax is one of the more resilient of the products available, providing a particularly hard finish.

I used to think waxing and polishing were the same. Not so. Polish smooths out minor imperfections; removes oxydation. A cutting polish removes more imperfections (small scratches, bad oxidation). After washing then polishing, the car should be waxed, for protection.

Quality of product used matters. You get what you pay for. And if you're like me, and don't want to be doing this twice a year (recommended by some) quality wax product matters a lot.

500N
21st Nov 2013, 05:18
Agree re modern paint.

My "old cars" used to polish up quite good and the paint was real paint.
Now, the number of cars you see that are under 10 - 12 years old with
faded or crazed paint is too many to count.


Lancelot
The sun over here is 10 times worse than in the UK for power,
burns up the inside of cars and the paint very quickly, far more
than in the UK.

sitigeltfel
21st Nov 2013, 05:44
Modern paint (i.e. in the last few years) is crap.

I don't know when it changed,

In the past decade the switch has been made from oil-based, to water-based paints. In my opinion they are not as durable as the old type.
Blame the Greens.

cattletruck
21st Nov 2013, 06:19
Stuff the Greens, I painted my first car, an old Cortina, with this:

http://www.mitre10.com.au/catalogue/assets/images/products/core/36074.jpg

The ultimate in paint protection :ok:

UniFoxOs
21st Nov 2013, 07:32
Never get too precious about new cars

Too right. They'll be back through the crusher again in a few years time.

Now my 36 and 40 year old runabouts - that's another case entirely.


UFO

gileraguy
21st Nov 2013, 07:41
Red Paint absorbs more light.
For proof, draw a red line and a black line on a sheet of paper. Then photocopy them. The red line will appear darker.

Red may go faster but it also oxidises faster.

Keeping a car clean helps the paint last longer too.

bugged on the right
21st Nov 2013, 08:40
I spent some time washing cars during a period of unemployment and was often tasked with the application of paint protection products.
Dealers would flog somebody a car and con them into buying a paint and interior protection scheme. The customer would pay between 3 and 5 hundred pounds for these and then go to a car park car wash only to have the new coating instantly removed by a very liberal spraying of truck wash. It gets the dirt off very efficiently.
Chromed Mercedes alloys would go milky after a dose of this stuff. That's why they are so quick and cheap.

Alloa Akbar
21st Nov 2013, 08:50
Red paint is more susceptible to UV light and therefore fades quicker, unless it is of good quality and contains the UV filter coating.

Auto Glym is your friend.

1DC
21st Nov 2013, 09:15
I haven't waxed or polished a car for years.My present car goes to the Croatians at the local car wash 2 or 3 times a month and at 3 years old it still looks as good as the day i bought it, after they have cleaned it.
I was amazed at the cost of a manned carwash in Oz compared to the UK. Last year took a dirty hire car in for a clean in Oz and it cost A$40 compared to A$11 for the same thing here.

Lightning Mate
21st Nov 2013, 09:29
Auto Glym is your friend.

Agreed. My son works for a big Porsche dealership and that's what they use.

24 hours after using the resin polish with the car under cover and not driven he recommends a coat of the clear extra gloss protection.

I do this once a year with my Mercedes and the dirt comes off easily after a hand wash.

Sallyann1234
21st Nov 2013, 09:55
Well I must be the odd one out here. My car goes through the garage car wash once a year when it is serviced.

MagnusP
21st Nov 2013, 10:03
Sallyann, you're not alone! I can't remember when I last washed/waxed the car, but there are a couple of young Polish (how appropriate) chaps who do a wash/wax/vacuum valet service for about 20 quid. I visit them about twice a year.

With the car, you understand. :}

Fareastdriver
21st Nov 2013, 10:15
Same here. My son bought a Nissan Micra when they first came out in 2003. It had a 'special body protection' put on when he bought it. It hasn't, as far as I can remember, ever been washed except when it goes in for a service. That's not often, because it has only done about 17.000 miles. However, we are within 400 metres from the sea and you can smell the salt in a gale.
Surprisingly, at the last MOT the headlights had to be replaced because the covers had clouded enough for it to fail the light test. I didn't find out until afterwards, otherwise I would have bought him a bottle of perspex polish.

Effluent Man
21st Nov 2013, 10:19
The red fading to pink was largely a pigment problem with Vauxhalls.Of course it doesn't manifest itself until the car is five years old but I would guess it is cured now.A lot of paint fade is due to accident damage repair refinishing which isn't of the same quality as the factory finish.

The biggest cause of paint damage is stone chip impact caused by following other traffic and the faster the road the more likely this is to occur.On the old VW Beetle you used to be able to get a plastic protective bib,they worked quite well.

Thomas coupling
21st Nov 2013, 10:32
It depends on how much emotion you attach to cars. I have a TR4 and a Maserati and without appropriate protection, either of those cars could lose thousands in second hand value because of poor bodywork. Horses for courses I suppose. Effluent - one can purchase what they call "bra's" in the trade to protect against: "road rash" :8

Lancelot37
21st Nov 2013, 10:58
Lancelot
The sun over here is 10 times worse than in the UK for power,
burns up the inside of cars and the paint very quickly, far more
than in the UK.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------


I'm currently in West Australia driving my sister in laws Toyota Camry which is 22 years old. It has never been polished or waxed, since new, and rarely washed. I washed it last week. I was asked yesterday why the car looked so good. We've been in 43C (109.4F) up in the north west. Want a photo?


I agree with Thomas re Classic cars etc.

cattletruck
21st Nov 2013, 13:02
I only wash my car once every 3 months regardless if it is new or not. The dirt and dust (as long as it isn't that red topsoil from dust storms) seems to protect the paintwork. But then again I only buy cars with colours that hide the dirt, like my current one with a colour called Tungsten Mica (metallic light brown) which does a brilliant job at hiding the dirt, only the windows which are heavily tinted show it up which is annoying.

cockney steve
21st Nov 2013, 13:45
Modern water-based paint is crap....the strength and durability come from the factory-applied clear-lacquer overcoating....all this "detailing" crap is for the kids with an inferiority complex, let them waste their cash on "clay bars" and all these fancy treatments.....sure the car has a better than showroom finish, but , almost without exception, it's a polished turd which will be recycled in 10-15 years time.

buy them and run them, wash the windows when they're dirty or, if it looks so disreputable the plod may take an active interest, so, out with ansoft floor-broom between rain showers, give it a scrub over and the next shower rinses it.

Never fails to amaze me , how much effort is put into the bit people see. yet the underside, wheelarch flanges etc. are ignored and allowed to fester with caked on dirt, grit and road-salt.

can't beat a good dose of gearbox-oil or ATF on the underside, added to waxoil, it keeps the film soft and "wets" the steel better.

Agreed, they're for using, not willy-waving.

polish sales cars and collector's cars,most of the rest are just transport . the neighbours may be impressed by your new "snot gobbler deluxe GT2 today.....in a week's time, it's just another car on the street (and another debt for you to pay over the next 3-5 years.)

Lancelot37
21st Nov 2013, 14:04
it's just another car on the street (and another debt for you to pay over the next 3-5 years.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If couldn't afford to pay cash I wouldn't buy one. Possibly if it was Interest free I might, but I'd rather fight the supplier for a lower price.

onetrack
21st Nov 2013, 14:32
The best paint protection is a top quality, full-body, car cover, if you can't park it under building cover.
Never park under trees - many tree leaves, blossoms and sap are corrosive and paint-damaging at best - and birds will spend all day practising their bombing aim. :ooh:

vulcanised
21st Nov 2013, 15:25
I have never polished my car and I had it washed about three years ago.

There's moss on the side window ledges and that will be removed if it snows and I get the broom out to clear it.

G-CPTN
21st Nov 2013, 15:31
I had a car that I washed once - and it went rusty . . .

Thomas coupling
21st Nov 2013, 18:39
The only reason I can afford a Maserati Granturismo is because for the last 10 years I have bought and sold classic cars. My last one was a TR4. Bought it in 2012 for 11000 cash. Sold it after spending 500 on it this September for 16950 in two days of the ad coming out. Do that 5 times and voila you get an almost free Maserati!

Spend an hour a weekend looking after even a boring run of the mill jalopy and you'll save a small fortune.
Example: I bought a gold (yuck) MX5 for 600. Last owner was a lady for 8 yrs. Car was a '98. I spent 4 hours washing cutting and polishing. ONCE.
Sold it 9 months later for 1400! Car needed one dedicated period reviving the bodywork and it added value overnight.

Cars: Don't know what depreciation means??? All because of some elbow grease. Those on here who can't be arsed - are my target audience....keep it up guys. I'm driving around in a Masser because of you.........

G-CPTN
21st Nov 2013, 19:24
Do you set out to buy cars for your stock, or do you rely on trade-ins?

My son bought a used C-Max from a small (non-franchise) dealer and traded his Focus (which had a few scrapes and dings).

As the dealer's stock included several high-end vehicles such as Porsche, Range Rover, and even a late-model Lamborghini, I assumed the the Focus would be traded through the auction, but a week or so later it appeared on his website looking much improved. It was a sound motor with FSH and reasonable mileage. The only reason for changing was the need for more space for his family of boys, so the Focus wasn't a pup though it was due a service and re-tax so better to offload it for a fair price.

The dealer made a modest profit (assuming he got his asking price) - though I don't know what he made on the C-Max of course (which was in pristine condition and outshone anything available from Ford).

Son was happy (as was I with the figures) and no doubt the dealer was content too.

cargosales
21st Nov 2013, 20:20
Do you set out to buy cars for your stock, or do you rely on trade-ins?

My son bought a used C-Max from a small (non-franchise) dealer and traded his Focus (which had a few scrapes and dings).

As the dealer's stock included several high-end vehicles such as Porsche, Range Rover, and even a late-model Lamborghini, I assumed the the Focus would be traded through the auction, but a week or so later it appeared on his website looking much improved. It was a sound motor with FSH and reasonable mileage. The only reason for changing was the need for more space for his family of boys, so the Focus wasn't a pup though it was due a service and re-tax so better to offload it for a fair price.

The dealer made a modest profit (assuming he got his asking price) - though I don't know what he made on the C-Max of course (which was in pristine condition and outshone anything available from Ford).

Son was happy (as was I with the figures) and no doubt the dealer was content too.

It sounds like you found a decent/reputable local dealer - they do exist!

In answer to others, my next door neighbour is, in his own words, 'totally OCD' about car presentation and spends many, many hours cleaning, polishing and buffing his own and others' cars to keep them looking at their best. [and to get the maximum value for the 2nd hand ones he's doing up on behalf of traders who don't have that skill].

Each to their own of course - he hates gardening and loathes the annual leaf fall. I however love gardening and look upon leaf mould as heaven so have offered him a 'swap' whereby I collect up his leaves and in return he explains to my OH the mysterious (to us at least) contents of the car care kit that came with her new motor last month.

CS

G-CPTN
21st Nov 2013, 20:52
It sounds like you found a decent/reputable local dealer
Yes, I was reticent about dealing with a dealer who had no premises other than a compound of cars and only opened by appointment, but I have to say that my son was dealt with fairly and honestly.

As the C-Max was untaxed I was uncertain how the exchange would be dealt with, but the dealer offered 7 days (free) insurance and accompanied my son to the Post Office where the vehicle was taxed using the dealer's insurance (son paid for the VED of course) and then the V5s were exchanged (well, the relevant parts as required) and it all worked fine.

Son had a fright when he couldn't find the wheel-locking key for the C-Max but it turned up in one of the miriad storage spaces that he had not discovered.

Son, who, previously was set on buying from a main dealer was disappointed by their poor stock (dirty, stained upholstery) and apparent indifference and couldn't care less attitude. One salesman sat in the back during the test-drive and puffed away on his electronic cigarette (which he tried to hide).
Furthermore, although they were Ford main dealers the salesman had scant knowledge of the Ford product and was unable to answer my questions about trim level features. The Sales manager was also completely wrong about the PowerShift automated-manual gearbox which he claimed had a torque-converter!

OFSO
21st Nov 2013, 21:20
If couldn't afford to pay cash I wouldn't buy one.

Ford, of course, are a Finance Company who just happen to manufacture and sell cars as a sideline.

axefurabz
21st Nov 2013, 21:40
There's moss on the side window ledges and that will be removed if it snows and I get the broom out to clear it. Hah! So we're not alone! I've also got a spider's web on the inside. :eek:


Last owner was a lady for 8 yrs.OK, I'll bite. What did she become after 8 years?

gingernut
21st Nov 2013, 22:06
Vauxhall Red is a particular problem. Having said that it still seems to do what it's designed for....ie protecting the metal work. It doesn't look pretty though.

Paintwork technology does seem to have come on in leaps and bounds, seem to remember that my dad made a good living welding sills on relatively new Ford Escorts, (and a lot of Rovers), lots of "underseal" (brush painted), a set of plugs, adjusting the tappets, bleeding the brakes and a trip to Blind Stan, the local MOT man. (I'm not joking.)

My brother went on to doing some resprays which looked fab.

We once bought an ex GMP Capri (2.8i with police spec), and sprayed it red. Used to cause loads of fun when we got pulled up, and were "PNC'd."

Nowadays it's all a bit clinical. Suspect if you did 'nowt, then you'd soon be able to shine it up. Personally, I use this "wash and wax" mix to wash the car, it's probably a bit of kidology, but love watching the rain waxing off the paintwork.

Do people still use T-Cut ? (Great just before you sold it.)

Effluent Man
21st Nov 2013, 22:47
Jn the trade we use a form of T Cut,Farecla is the best one.You can restore red for a while but it tends to fade quite quickly,especially in summer.I have dabbled in classics I currentlly have a 1973 Saab 96 annd a '58 MG Magnette ZB Varitone,the first tax exempt,the second tax and MOT exempt.

onetrack
22nd Nov 2013, 01:47
Red paint is the worst colour of all colours for fading - and not just on cars. To my great surprise, I have seen a wrecked red Subaru (purchased for parting-out) parked out in the weather and blazing hot sun for over 10 years, and the red paint on that hasn't faded in the slightest, and is as good as the day it left the factory. I've no idea why.

A study done years ago stated that green cars are the best-looked-after cars of all. For some reason, people who buy green cars are compulsive car-carers. My stepfather was one of them.

He'd park way up the end of the shoppers car park where there were no cars, and walk an extra 300M, just to ensure that no-one parked their car alongside his, and banged their open door on it. His cars were always showroom condition, even after 15 yrs.