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Sunnyjohn
11th Nov 2013, 21:27
A year ago I predicted that farceblock would be gone in two years. From The Guardian online:
Facebook made a startling admission in its earnings announcement this month: it was seeing a "decrease in daily users, specifically among teens". In other words, teenagers are still on Facebook; they're just not using it as much as they did. It was a landmark statement, since teens are the demographic who often point the rest of us towards the next big thing.

Their gradual exodus to messaging apps such as WhatsApp, WeChat and KakaoTalk boils down to Facebook becoming a victim of its own success. The road to gaining nearly 1.2 billion monthly active users has seen the mums, dads, aunts and uncles of the generation who pioneered Facebook join it too, spamming their walls with inspirational quotes and images of cute animals, and (shock, horror) commenting on their kids' photos. No surprise, then, that Facebook is no longer a place for uninhibited status updates about pub antics, but an obligatory communication tool that younger people maintain because everyone else does.

All the fun stuff is happening elsewhere. On their mobiles. Interesting that here in Spain, 95% of young people use personal messaging rather than farceblock.

Seems that people don't like the lack of privacy of farceblock, don't want their Mums and Dads to know what they're doing and don't want anything to do with a social network that is becoming inhabited by silveries (people over 25). Personal messaging is personal only to the sender and the recipient (and the NSA of course but with Snowden about, that's less of a problem).

With farceblock shares now falling - sorry, in Dailyfailspeak, plummeting - farceblock could well be gone in a year. You saw it here first . . .

Cacophonix
11th Nov 2013, 21:33
sorry, in Dailyfailspeak, plummeting


With the terrified passengers screaming and pooping their trolleys! ;)

Friend Face - YouTube

Caco

Vitesse
11th Nov 2013, 21:38
I believe that many internet sites become fashionable but eventually fade to comparative obscurity.

Who now uses Friends Reunited?

Facebook and T.w.i.t.t.e.r will go the way of all things.

Part of the problem is the sites' gradual drift away from what made them so attractive in the first place. They get corporate and bloated.

My daughter's Spanish exchange partner used something called (iirc) Tuente. Facebook just wasn't popular.

dead_pan
11th Nov 2013, 21:53
Well, I'll be the first to dance on its grave - it has been a bane of mine and my daughters' lives for the past 3+ years.

On this subject, I have been meaning to pen a letter to the BBC asking why they promote Faecesbook and Twotter ahead of the myriad of other social networking sites out on the interweb. I thought they weren't allowed to favour one particular company or brand.

dead_pan
11th Nov 2013, 21:56
Who now uses Friends Reunited?

Not forgetting MySpace and Bebo. Good riddance I say.

ex_matelot
11th Nov 2013, 23:24
I've heard somebody actually say: "LOL" as a vocal expression. I would have punched their lights out but it was a woman.

Richo77
11th Nov 2013, 23:56
You heard it here second... in a years time nothing will have changed. Wishful thinking at best.

11Fan
12th Nov 2013, 02:07
I would have punched their lights out but it was a woman.

Afraid that damage had already been done matelot.

Capetonian
12th Nov 2013, 06:56
We went out last night with a friend, and his teenage daughter and her boyfriend. Neither of them use Faecesbook, although they both have accounts. It's 'just so yesterday' according to them. They use something called 'What's up' instead. Interesting though that some adult friends of mine use 'Facetime' to communicate with their family overseas.

Me, well, I'm still stuck in the dark ages. I use my ancient cellphones, laptop, and Pprune!

VP959
12th Nov 2013, 07:08
I suspect that, as well as being just a general fashion trend to move from one fad to another after a few years, there's also, perhaps, a glimmer of recognition that putting all of one's private life on display, to be used or misused by all and sundry (including potential future employers and one's parents, not to mention the emotional blackmail and bullying that seems rife there) was not a good idea.

I also suspect that the misguided youth who've switched to new social networking sites may be under the delusion that they have privacy and these new sites may be solely the domain of their peers. When they discover that these, too, are just a part of the global corporate personal data gathering and marketing machine they may well move on to something else.

Having seen second hand (via the impact on a friends daughter) the pretty devastating negative effects of unwittingly sharing all one's most intimate details, in photos and video over a social networking site, only to then realise that NOTHING on them is ever really private and can be copied and spread around for years afterwards, I can't say I feel there's much to be said for any of them.

TWT
12th Nov 2013, 07:11
They use something called 'What's up' instead

WhatsApp :: Home (http://www.whatsapp.com/)

ExRAFRadar
12th Nov 2013, 07:14
My daughter,15, and her friends never touch Facebook now.
For them it's all WhatsApp or other IM type services.
Believe it or not they actually show a modicum of maturity. My daughters friend said to me "They are not real friends and who cares that someone's baby gurgled and it sounded like 'mummy'"
Spot on, I thought.

Sallyann1234
12th Nov 2013, 08:47
It seems self evident that FB was at its peak when they launched its IPO to extract the maximum cash from the punters. It is on the decline now but will still be gathering personal data from foolish people for years to come.

Sunnyjohn
12th Nov 2013, 21:11
You heard it here second... in a years time nothing will have changed. We shall see. Wishful thinking at best. Yup!

ExXB
13th Nov 2013, 11:46
Interesting though that some adult friends of mine use 'Facetime' to communicate with their family overseas.

FaceTime is not a 'social networking site'. It's an application, sorta like Skype, that allows Apple OS users to communicate. It's good quality video and (IMHO) works much better than Skype for that purpose. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles of Skype - you can't call a landline, for example.

500N
13th Nov 2013, 11:54
Facebook is being used by businesses a hell of a lot.

For keeping in touch with Customers, announcing new products etc.

CelticRambler
13th Nov 2013, 13:42
... at least by those businesses that typically support the junk mail industry. FB is a great platform for promoting the insubstantial and instantly obsolete, but impossible to use for sales/service that involves "mature reflection".

500N
13th Nov 2013, 13:47
I would disagree.

Retailers I deal with use it all the time to good effect
and not in the junk mail industry.

VP959
13th Nov 2013, 14:47
One problem is that there are a lot of consumers (like me) who don't have an account on farcebook and don't ever get to see anything that these companies choose to post there.

In my case, this has resulted in at least one company not getting my business, as they've (rather stupidly) decided to use that site as their only way of showing potential customers what they sell.

I had a hilarious discussion with a daft lady at one company, when I asked if she could send me some photos of their products so I could see what they offered. She referred me to their page on farcebook, and when I said I don't go there and don't have an account she said "sorry, but I can't help you". I was tempted to email the firm and tell them how they'd just potentially lost a substantial order, but really couldn't be bothered. I reckoned that if they were too stupid to realise that locking images of their products away on a membership-only web site then they didn't deserve to get my business.

Capetonian
13th Nov 2013, 15:01
I am in the same camp as VP959. I refuse to deal with companies that only communicate via social nitwitting sites. Further, I refuse to deal with companies that don't publish normal geographic telephone numbers and who expect customers to communicate via expensive 0870/0844/0845 type numbers, which are even more expensive, or impossible, to call from outside the UK.

Smeagol
13th Nov 2013, 15:05
VP959 & Capetonian


:ok::ok::ok::ok::ok:

SpringHeeledJack
13th Nov 2013, 15:06
I had a hilarious discussion with a daft lady at one company, when I asked if she could send me some photos of their products so I could see what they offered. She referred me to their page on farcebook, and when I said I don't go there and don't have an account she said "sorry, but I can't help you". I was tempted to email the firm and tell them how they'd just potentially lost a substantial order, but really couldn't be bothered. I reckoned that if they were too stupid to realise that locking images of their products away on a membership-only web site then they didn't deserve to get my business.

A side issue, but too many UK and European companies seem to function on the basis of what suits them best, rather than wanting to please the customer. Perhaps they have no shortage of big spending customers, but with the present economic horizon it would seem wise to be as accommodating as is possible.



SHJ

finfly1
13th Nov 2013, 18:02
I was just thinking on that very subject recently. I wanted to write a thank you note to a firm which had done a good job and asked for an email address to use.

The furnished address did have a space for writing complaints or compliments, but instead of a blank spot, there were page after mind numbing page of questions to answer, like ticket number etc. The site would not let you skip a page, so I closed the website and wondered to myself just that -- is this for my benefit or the company? If for them, why do they deliberately make it tedious if not impossible to communicate effectively.

Sunnyjohn
13th Nov 2013, 18:10
Facebook is being used by businesses a hell of a lot. I concede that this is a good point, which suggests that once the youngsters have deserted, it will be solely a commercial site and not a social network.

500N
13th Nov 2013, 18:11
"Spot on, if a company limits itself to using fakebook to present itself then its not thinking"

I'd add "only" in that sentence.

I agree with VP and Cape, if that is the only way they communicate and market they are crazy.

On the other hand, using it as one method of a number is fine.

Same as Ebay, some sell heaps on it, others use it solely to let consumers know
what they sell and have business name and address in large letters so people know they can come into a physical shop of they want.

ExSp33db1rd
13th Nov 2013, 20:42
Me, well, I'm still stuck in the dark ages. I use my ancient cellphones, laptop, and Pprune!

Likewise, I actually bought a stamp and stuck it on a letter yesterday.

Richo77
13th Nov 2013, 21:36
Aah but it can be such a handy tool... I do some work for an insurance company who insure most of the Rugby League players in Aust. All of the social networking sites are blocked so that staff cant access them but i had to give access to a couple of their claims staff because they "shadow" some of the players on "compo". Apparently they save buckets because Frank with the bad back posted updates and pics from a theme park on a rollercoaster etc.

SpringHeeledJack
14th Nov 2013, 07:20
Aah but it can be such a handy tool... I do some work for an insurance company who insure most of the Rugby League players in Aust. All of the social networking sites are blocked so that staff cant access them but i had to give access to a couple of their claims staff because they "shadow" some of the players on "compo". Apparently they save buckets because Frank with the bad back posted updates and pics from a theme park on a rollercoaster etc.

There's no excuse for people who compartmentalise their behaviour and can't imagine that there are others who can join the dots together and catch them out when they behave fraudulently. That said, anecdotally there seems to be a mass of people who do this and the authorities are either unable or unwilling to take action.



SHJ

Worrals in the wilds
14th Nov 2013, 07:42
I had a hilarious discussion with a daft lady at one company, when I asked if she could send me some photos of their products so I could see what they offered. She referred me to their page on farcebook, and when I said I don't go there and don't have an account she said "sorry, but I can't help you".That's really poor customer service. I have a loose involvement with a small and impoverished business that uses Facebook for marketing, but they also maintain an up to date web page, send email updates, post out newsletters on request (though fewer every year) and have nice people standing by to answer the phone or at least return calls when messages are left.

Facebook is useful, but it's only one tool in the box. Relying on it purely is like having a toolbox that only has a spanner in it. :confused: I find it bewildering that at the very least they wouldn't also maintain a website and be able to send a basic (even an office printed) catalogue. Some businesses don't seem to want to actually sell stuff.
Apparently they save buckets because Frank with the bad back posted updates and pics from a theme park on a rollercoaster etc. Get union officials started on the subject :mad:. It's very hard to dispute a fake sickie accusation when despite the accused's heart-rending claim that he was suffering from acute Typhus, a bad back and flu like symptoms (all at the same time) his Facebook updates indicate that he spent his day off helping a friend move house before smashing his bench press PB at the gym that evening :hmm:.
It's even harder to dispute when said accused is Facebook Friends with half of the HR Department. :rolleyes:

VP959
14th Nov 2013, 10:32
Quote:
I had a hilarious discussion with a daft lady at one company, when I asked if she could send me some photos of their products so I could see what they offered. She referred me to their page on farcebook, and when I said I don't go there and don't have an account she said "sorry, but I can't help you".

That's really poor customer service. I have a loose involvement with a small and impoverished business that uses Facebook for marketing, but they also maintain an up to date web page, send email updates, post out newsletters on request (though fewer every year) and have nice people standing by to answer the phone or at least return calls when messages are left.

Facebook is useful, but it's only one tool in the box. Relying on it purely is like having a toolbox that only has a spanner in it. I find it bewildering that at the very least they wouldn't also maintain a website and be able to send a basic (even an office printed) catalogue. Some businesses don't seem to want to actually sell stuff.

The company concerned supplies floor tiles. They don't have a web site or stores (I got the feeling they were pretty web-illiterate talking to the lady on the phone) and operate what looks to be a warehouse-type direct sales operation. I found out about them from a friend, who suggested I call them to see what they'd got, as at the time I was looking for a lot of floor tiles. That's when I discovered that the only way to see samples of what they were offering was to sign up to farcebook.

Crazy way to run a business, but apparently their prices are very good for what they sell.

Worrals in the wilds
14th Nov 2013, 10:45
Crazy way to run a business, but apparently their prices are very good for what they sell. And this may be the crux. 'We suck, but we're cheap.' :uhoh: Did you buy from them? Did others??

There's a bit of this around and if it gets them sales, good luck to them. However, I don't think it works in the long term. IMO it would be better to also offer at least a basic web catalogue, but I guess that will be measured by their survival or failure using the 'Facebook only' technique.

VP959
14th Nov 2013, 10:59
I didn't use them, as I couldn't get to see what they were offering, but I guess they may survive given the high number of farcebook users. Their prices may have been cheap, but without seeing the tiles it's hard to be sure if they were good value.

cattletruck
14th Nov 2013, 11:14
Businesses using Feacesbook and other social media is known as having a "Digital Strategy" - yes, them are just wank words.

It's up there with paying someone to make the company site appear at the top of Goggle searches. They employ Digital Strategists, Search Engine Optimisers, Campaign Managers, and bucket loads of other useless job positions that bare no relationship with improving the quality of the product being sold. It's the old maxim of the more money spent on advertising then the bigger the bonus for the person who finally moves the crap wares out of the warehouse.

Consumers are leaving Feacesbook in droves and it's only the foolish businesses that are now being milked to adopt a Digital Strategy. The horse may be dead, but it's not for I.T consultants.

I think I'll start my own consultancy to exploit the disappointment experienced by these businesses with using Feacesbook. I'd call it aboutface.com - it would just be a web site design business.

Capetonian
14th Nov 2013, 13:39
I was approached a few months ago by a woman (with whom I was acquainted in a different context) who had set herself up as a 'digital strategisation specialist' or some such wankword title. She wanted to charge me a large sum of money to put my business into the eye of the world using social nitwanking sites. When I explained that I don't have a 'business', that I'm happily unemployed/selfemployed and thus able to choose when and where and for whom I work she got very arrogant and implied I was 'a nobody' and would remain so.
When I asked her why if her strategies were so successful, she needed to go touting and pushing for business whereas I, a nobody in her eyes, didn't, she was unable to answer the question.
Point, I think, proved.

cattletruck
14th Nov 2013, 14:03
Cap, it's called a "Digital Presence" and all it involves is creating an account on every single social networking site that says the same thing. Then you pay peanuts to some service in India to "like" and make "positive" comments on all your social networking sites.

Or you can pay a 'digital strategisation specialist' several thousand dollars a month to do exactly the same thing for you.

The only minor unforseen problem with this strategy is that every other business is doing it too and your efforts won't stand out - it's just background noise.

Richo77
14th Nov 2013, 21:42
Cattle, just a clarification you don't have to pay anyone to make your site top of the list on goggle. You just have to register it with search engines which is free, you don't have to part with any company or personal information and takes under a minute.

500N
14th Nov 2013, 21:54
4 other major things you can doto get a high ranking in google,
especially if in a competitive market.

Make sure your meta tags in your web site are filled out with key words

Change them every couple of months. I do this by cutting the sequence of
words in half and putting the back bit at the front and the front at the back.
This ensures that google has to completely re catalogue your web site.

Make sure your front page changes on at least a monthly basis, enough to make google re catalogue your web site. A few sentence changes makes all the difference.

Get linked from your suppliers and as many as you can.

VP959
15th Nov 2013, 06:33
Cap, it's called a "Digital Presence" and all it involves is creating an account on every single social networking site that says the same thing. Then you pay peanuts to some service in India to "like" and make "positive" comments on all your social networking sites.

Or you can pay a 'digital strategisation specialist' several thousand dollars a month to do exactly the same thing for you.

The only minor unforseen problem with this strategy is that every other business is doing it too and your efforts won't stand out - it's just background noise.

The other problem is that, of these morons who think advertising this way is a good thing, some tend to also seek to get free advertising by posting in discussion fora. Pretty much every time this happens on an actively moderated forum the posts get deleted and forum members get angry about spammers.

I've always thought that, as a form of advertising, this strategy is deeply flawed, as pissing off your target audience seems to me to be negative advertising. My thoughts when seeing this sort of stuff on a discussion forum post is to try and remember never to use the company trying to advertise this way, and I doubt I'm alone.

cattletruck
15th Nov 2013, 11:46
VP959, you are very correct with your observation. While the print media worry about losing advertising revenue to the electronic media, they forget one very important point - advertising is all about building a relationship with your customer.

With consumers leaving Feacesbook in droves there is not much relationship building available. But if you've outsourced your "Digital Strategy" to "Digital Professionals" then you won't be told that, instead you will be told "more is good" to an audience that is really filtering you out as annoying noise.

Blacksheep
15th Nov 2013, 12:32
The ultimate in negative advertising is the off-shore call centres that phone you up every evening and bother you with cold calls. 5.15 pm and its the Phillipinas, 8.30 pm and its the Indians. I guess we get 20 or more calls a week from these pests.

G-CPTN
15th Nov 2013, 12:37
we get 20 or more calls a week from these pests
And there's no way of stopping them apart from caller display and barring overseas calls.

My current policy is to respond with 'Hello' - followed with Hello at regular intervals until the caller gives up in frustration. I don't use any other words, just Hello . . .

CelticRambler
19th Nov 2013, 17:45
Depending on what how much I want to be distracted from real work, answering these calls (mine seem limited to solar panel installations or arranging the preliminary no-obligation assessment that goes with them) provides a useful opportunity to practise new words and phrases in my adopted language. When particularly inclined to procrastination, I like to see just how long I can keep the conversation going before they hang up in frustration. :E

Richo77
19th Nov 2013, 22:39
Dealing with Cold Callers is easy if you have the right equipment:

Namely a 3-4 yr old. They are chatty little wonders who LOVE talking on the phone, just hand it off telling them its someone who wants to hear about Dora the Explorer or Barbie or the like.

Keeping a whistle near the phone and blasting it down the line is a bit of a treat too.

But my favourite is to answer their first few questions extremely positively then start asking them what the are wearing, are they feeling frisky too, etc etc.

Im just trying to brighten their day!

ExSp33db1rd
21st Nov 2013, 18:51
Ref: Farcebook ...........

This isn't new, has even have been posted on PPRuNe previously, but seems relevant to this thread.

Should I Really Join Facebook?

Read it all the way through! It's really quite true!!

A good laugh for people in the over 70 group -- and those close to it!!!
When I bought my Blackberry, I thought about the 30-year business I ran with 1800 employees, all without a cell phone that plays music, takes videos, pictures and communicates with Facebook and Twitter.


I signed up under duress for Twitter and Facebook, so my seven kids, their spouses, my 13 grand kids and 2 great grand kids could communicate with me in the modern way. I figured I could handle something as simple as Twitter with only 140 characters of space.

My phone was beeping every three minutes with the details of everything except the bowel movements of the entire next generation. I am not ready to live like this. I keep my cell phone in the garage in my golf bag.

The kids bought me a GPS for my last birthday because they say I get lost every now and then going over to the grocery store or library. I keep that in a box under my tool bench with the Blue tooth [it's red] phone I am supposed to use when I drive. I wore it once and was standing in line at Barnes and Noble talking to my wife and everyone in the nearest 50 yards was glaring at me. I had to take my hearing aid out to use it, and I got a little loud.

I mean the GPS looked pretty smart on my dash board, but the lady inside that gadget was the most annoying, rudest person I had run into in a long time. Every 10 minutes, she would sarcastically say, "Re-calc-u-lating." You would think that she could be nicer. It was like she could barely tolerate me. She would let go with a deep sigh and then tell me to make a U-turn at the next light. Then if I made a right turn instead. Well, it was not a good relationship...
When I get really lost now, I call my wife and tell her the name of the cross streets and while she is starting to develop the same tone as Gypsy, the GPS lady, at least she loves me.

To be perfectly frank, I am still trying to learn how to use the cordless phones in our house. We have had them for 4 years, but I still haven't figured out how I lose three phones all at once and have to run around digging under chair cushions, checking bathrooms, and the dirty laundry baskets when the phone rings.

The world is just getting too complex for me. They even mess me up every time I go to the grocery store. You would think they could settle on something themselves but this sudden "Paper or Plastic?" every time I check out just knocks me for a loop. I bought some of those cloth reusable bags to avoid looking confused, but I never remember to take them with me.

Now I toss it back to them. When they ask me, "Paper or plastic?" I just say, "Doesn't matter to me. I am bi-sacksual." Then it's their turn to stare at me with a blank look. I was recently asked if I tweet. I answered, No, but I do f-rt a lot."

P.S. I know some of you are not over 70. I sent it to you to allow you to forward it to those who are. I figured your sense of humor could handle it....

We senior citizens don't need anymore gadgets. The TV remote and the garage door remote are about all we can handle.
............................................................ ..............................

P.s. The 'system' has changed words to PPRuNe - not me !! The original said Tw****er and Tw**t