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ExRAFRadar
9th Nov 2013, 09:26
Aside from the 'Whatever' (which actually seems to be petering out), 'I was like,"and 'I was literally waiting for a bus' is there any others that really get your goat.

I was in a meeting with some very senior people at work, and at the end this chap, who was in charge of 100 hundreds of people's careers said "Cool Bananas, that's a wrap"

I was like, "Dude, WTF, get with the program and say something meaningful. Your not directing a Hollywood blockbuster FFS"

So mine for the moment is "Cool Bananas"

Lon More
9th Nov 2013, 09:29
"Absolutely" beloved by pundits everywhere :ugh:

Worrals in the wilds
9th Nov 2013, 10:09
that's a wrapCertainly on my list.
My usual response is along the lines of 'Wow, did you also work in the entertainment industry? Fabulous, we probably know some of the same people. Cruddy money but loads of fun, huh. What shows did you work on? :}
Probably why I'm seen as not being a People Person. :\


I also find fake military jargon irritating. I've no issue with people who are actually ex-military using their own lingo, but it's getting very trendy for management types to use the jargon in the mistaken belief that it sounds cool. 'Sitrep' and 'command and control' spring to mind, particularly when used by people whose idea of roughing it is being forced to stay in a three star motel and having to borrow a set of golf clubs. :hmm:

Cacophonix
9th Nov 2013, 10:12
Whereas the phrase "gripping my sh#t" doesn't boil my piss at all... ;)

Like it!

Caco

Super VC-10
9th Nov 2013, 10:18
"At risk" - of what?! If I buy a lottery ticket, I'm at risk of winning the jackpot! :p

"Real(ly)" - as opposed to "artificial(ly)" or "unreal(ly)"?

"Train station" - no, it's a railway station. Always has been, always will be.

Diacritics (the lack thereof). People not bothering to spell words like hôtel, naïve, garçon etc. correctly. Understandable in the day of typesetting when these characters were hard to come by; but there's no excuse nowadays for not learning your ALT codes.

People in 4x4s who are too precious to get them wet or muddy. You know the type, only use them in big cities or swerve around a puddle instead of driving through it

Cacophonix
9th Nov 2013, 10:18
Totally, I am sure, oh my god...............

Val speak...

FRANK ZAPPA -- VALLEY GIRL - YouTube

Caco

TWT
9th Nov 2013, 10:26
I still get emails from the CEO (All Staff) that use the phrase 'Going Forward".

Worrals in the wilds
9th Nov 2013, 10:29
People in 4x4s who are too precious to get them wet or muddy. You know the type, only use them in big cities or swerve around a puddle instead of driving through it Yeah baby...(that's probably on someone's list ;)).
I recently drove up the Bloomfield Track and there was a whole convoy of shiny city 4WDs pulled up at the first creek crossing while their proud owners huddled in a group assessing the 'terrible' conditions ahead :bored:. If they'd had the courtesy to pull over to the side of the track I wouldn't have minded, but their cars were parked all over the track blocking suitable access points, while their owners wandered in and out of the creek like Brown's cows, and looking similarly dopey. One particular f:mad:tard (probably on another person's list ;);)) ambled in front of my vehicle through the creek after I'd started to cross, then got upset when I honked her (other options being 1. run her over or 2. stop and flood my vehicle's engine).
Seriously, stay home and visit Dreamworld. The carpark has plenty of space for [email protected]

ExRAFRadar
9th Nov 2013, 10:31
Worrals mate - you should have been in IT after GW1.

Every Anti-Virus maker was into 'Stealth Signature, Precision Guided Sub Program,'Smart Targeting' and here is my fav 'Minimal collateral damage to non virus programs'
Tossers.

Was working with an Ex RAF on Server support about the same time, he had the habit of saying "Server x has gone Tango Uniform" to which I would always reply "Any ETRO". Until we realised people were looking at us funny.

Took me years to stop saying 'Standby' and 'Wait One' on the bloody phone.

Capetonian
9th Nov 2013, 10:33
"It was totally, like, wicked. Really cool."
"Amazeballs."

Worrals in the wilds
9th Nov 2013, 10:37
Every Anti-Virus maker was into 'Stealth Signature, Precision Guided Sub Program,'Smart Targeting' and here is my fav 'Minimal collateral damage to non virus programs'
Tossers.
AAARgh. That's what I mean. Glad it's not just me.
I do the standby thing with phones too, and also automatically use the phonetic alphabet, which confuses people. I don't mean to... :O

Hobo
9th Nov 2013, 10:41
WITW I recently drove up the Bloomfield Track Mrs H and I did this in a Subaru Outback in July 2011 - no worries, and I reckon your Avis 2WD hire car could have coped with the July conditions. ( I know for a fact that a 2WD Avis car can cope, in the dry, with the Flinders Ranges NP including various creek beds.)


.

Dushan
9th Nov 2013, 10:46
Awesome.
You know what?
Using "invite" as a noun, as in "did you send him the invite?"
Using "ask" as a noun, as in "what is the ask?"
Using "spend" as a noun, as in "what is the spend up to date?"
Grrrrrrrrrrr..

Capetonian
9th Nov 2013, 10:50
'Facebook' used as a verb (in Facebook in any context)
'Grow' in the context of 'help us to grow our business.'

Worrals in the wilds
9th Nov 2013, 10:50
I know for a fact that a 2WD Avis car can cope, in the dry, with the Flinders Ranges NP including various creek beds.I'm guessing that you didn't tell Avis that. :E 'Yeah, the car was great, how about all that mud in the undercarriage and that small dead animal stuck in the grille... dunno where we picked all that up :confused:. Must have been in the carpark of that picturesque little country church we stopped at...:suspect: Anyway here's the keys and bye now.' :}:}:}

Agreed that it's not a difficult drive unless there's been recent heavy rain. After navigating past the morons I was passed by a Ford Falcon (standard 6 cylinder 2WD) that wasn't having any trouble. It was the sight of all the awesome, brand new, top of the range 4WD Landcriusers wasting away while their owners dithered that made me :sad:.
P.S. Hope you had a great time. :ok:
P.P.S. re verbs...
http://www.unmemorabletitle.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/calvin-and-hobbes.jpg

tony draper
9th Nov 2013, 10:52
Lessons will be learned.:suspect:

arcniz
9th Nov 2013, 11:02
'command and control'

...is an explicit complex paradigm, of considerable scope and importance, not jargon, and not just shallow buzz.

B Fraser
9th Nov 2013, 11:15
Tony,

"Lessons will be learned" is management speak for "ok, it was my fault but I don't have the backbone to do the decent thing and resign as I have a shares option that means I have to stick around for another year before trousering a huge payoff".

I think you've known that for years. ;)

One thing that does irritate me is the announcement on the train "we are approaching London Paddington which is our last and final destination where this service terminates". Imagine that, not only is it the destination but also the last and final station where we terminate our journey. I guess that the odds of the train continuing to St James's Park irrespective of whether I have a ticket are not good then.

Perhaps I should emulate Paddington Bear and give the announcer a very hard stare indeed.

https://skitch-img.s3.amazonaws.com/20101110-d2fr8satxfkhnu2uxe4e7wbddt.jpg

Krystal n chips
9th Nov 2013, 11:28
The imported terms "not on my watch"......"will not be happening any time soon" and the use of the word "folks" when referring to a populace.

Likewise "stakeholders and partners".....

And the extended, if not extruded, at times "soooooooo" in conversations.

Any form of over accentuated Hingerlish Harkscent...the inflection of tone being a vain attempt to somehow impress those listening that the owner of the gob making the utterance is important within society.....rarely the case of course.

ExRAFRadar
9th Nov 2013, 11:31
Oh Train announcements, that's a good one.
"Thank you for traveling South West Trains" Like I have a bloody choice.

Also the last stop thing; "This train will shortly arrive at Waterloo where it will terminate". Lets hope so, otherwise the hundreds of people on the concourse waiting for their delayed train are about to have their day made that bit more exciting.

B Fraser
9th Nov 2013, 11:44
It annoys me when the train stops a long way short of the buffers (crikey, I'm showing my age with that one, they are probably called hydraulic deceleration units these days).

A few weeks ago, the train pulled up a good 80 feet short. As I passed the driver who was exiting his cab, I was very tempted to say "don't worry, we'll walk the rest of the way". Perhaps next time, I'll say it and see what happens.

Rather be Gardening
9th Nov 2013, 12:46
Starting every sentence off with "So.....". It seems to be a particular affliction amongst the metropolitan chattering classes.

Dak Man
9th Nov 2013, 12:50
"England 2015 RWC contenders" spouted incessantly on Sky and the EBC, now that puts an Action Man ninja style grip on my shit.

BlueDiamond
9th Nov 2013, 12:51
The phrase "British English". If Americans wish to differentiate, they should refer to what they speak as "American" or "American English".

ShyTorque
9th Nov 2013, 13:26
We're all on a roll Gangnam style and singing off the same hymn sheet, innit. LOL!

:E

charliegolf
9th Nov 2013, 13:44
When you 'watch it back' you will notice.....

Grrrr

CG

TheChitterneFlyer
9th Nov 2013, 15:54
Supermarket staff announcements grip my proverbial shit. It's that rise of the tonal announcement as if the announcer was singing a bloody song... and then repeats it all over again... in a descending tone!

1DC
9th Nov 2013, 16:50
Work in progress....

AtomKraft
9th Nov 2013, 16:56
Apart from the sickeningly common use of "absolutely"- how about just a plain "yes" now and again to break the bloody monotony?

"Doing the right thing" crops up all to often as a phrase that simultaneously reinforces the correctness of whatever was to be done while rendering all other options as wicked and unconsiderable- which is invariably not the case.
One of thattwat Blairs', but since adopted by many other arseholes.

Mechta
9th Nov 2013, 17:50
"Myself and ...."

"My bad"

"End of..."

Blues&twos
9th Nov 2013, 18:07
Among advertisements for the latest Hollywood blockbusters the voiceover dramatically says "Out November twenty three".......

People who say "I'm good" when they mean "I'm very well, thank you".

Sunnyjohn
9th Nov 2013, 18:43
A few weeks ago, the train pulled up a good 80 feet short. As I passed the driver who was exiting his cab, I was very tempted to say "don't worry, we'll walk the rest of the way". Perhaps next time, I'll say it and see what happens. What you should have done was to ask him politely why he stopped 80 feet from the buffers in which case he would most likely have told you that there was a track circuit fault and he had been instructed not to stop on a dead circuit. Try to be polite - things are much better that way.

Sunnyjohn
9th Nov 2013, 18:46
I used to hate 'solutions' but I find now that I am getting a bit of fun from them:
Bathroom solutions - shower gel
Toilet solutions - urine
Kitchen solutions - washing up liquid
Bedroom solutions - I leave that one to you
IT solutions - stuff for cleaning your keyboard
Management solutions - a very large bucket of water

Your turn . . .

goudie
9th Nov 2013, 18:52
Calm down dears, the words/phrases are only an expression of the English language, which is forever changing...know what I mean!

Fox3WheresMyBanana
9th Nov 2013, 18:53
Education solutions - G&T mainly....;),

or whiteboard cleaner (no ice or lemon)

4mastacker
9th Nov 2013, 19:02
The "This is a health and safety announcement" that prefaces the nanny state instructions, correction, diktats of how we go about our lives, especially on railway stations, bus stations and airports.

Super VC-10
9th Nov 2013, 19:15
[email protected] have a sloping travellator to get from one floor to another. Announcements are "please hold the handrail" and "you are now approaching the end of the escalator, please step off"

My thoughts on these are "No, I'm a big boy now and I won't hold the :mad: handrail" and "one of these days I'm gonna cover the soles of my shoes in washing up liquid and just stay there at the top" :\

uffington sb
9th Nov 2013, 19:34
I hate it when people say "Take care" at the end of a conversation.
I'm tempted to say "I'm glad you told me that as I was just about to walk in front of that train/bus/car/armoured fighting vehicle etc"
Of course I'm going to [email protected]@dy well take care.

Dushan
9th Nov 2013, 19:42
"No worries" or "no problem" as a response to "thank you".

uffington sb
9th Nov 2013, 19:43
B Fraser.

The buffer stops are probably fitted with Train Protection & Warning System (TPWS) and if the driver goes over it, the TPWS would activate and bring the train to a stop.
The driver would then have a lot explaining to do.

Deepest Norfolk
9th Nov 2013, 19:44
"Touch base with" and "Drilling down".
:(

DN

Blues&twos
9th Nov 2013, 20:20
A few weeks ago, the train pulled up a good 80 feet short. As I passed the driver who was exiting his cab, I was very tempted to say "don't worry, we'll walk the rest of the way". Perhaps next time, I'll say it and see what happens.

How do you cope once you step foot outside the station??

Duchess_Driver
9th Nov 2013, 20:54
Dudes, really, OMG! You guys are so up your own arseholes! At this moment in time if you cant see that if you are not part of the solution then you must be part of the problem. Now, I'm not ruling it in, but....

;)

spInY nORmAn
9th Nov 2013, 21:12
I really, really like Stephen Fry's take on the use of the English language. Check it out:

Stephen Fry Kinetic Typography - Language - YouTube

RedhillPhil
9th Nov 2013, 23:07
I really, really like Stephen Fry's take on the use of the English language. Check it out:

Stephen Fry Kinetic Typography - Language - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7E-aoXLZGY)

Oh yes, "take". We used to have thoughts, ideas or versions. Now we have takes.

RedhillPhil
9th Nov 2013, 23:13
B Fraser.

The buffer stops are probably fitted with Train Protection & Warning System (TPWS) and if the driver goes over it, the TPWS would activate and bring the train to a stop.
The driver would then have a lot explaining to do.

I'm afraid that it's worse than that. Because the (mostly) non driving experienced management can't/don't trust drivers to be able to use the brakes they (the drivers) are taught and encouraged in something called "defensive driving". This involves - amongst other things - stopping way short of buffer stops at terminus stations and entering stations very slowly. I don't know how to-day's modern driver would have coped with running a vacuum braked train into platform seven or eight at Liverpool Street in the seventies and stopping five feet from the buffers to get the tail end of the train in clear.

er340790
10th Nov 2013, 00:48
Aye, but there's the rub...

(Thank-you, William.)

Norman Deplume
10th Nov 2013, 04:23
I'm working on a some abbreviations. so far I have translated:

"Root and branch reform": Change
"Lessons will be learned" : "We were caught"
"A big ask" : Difficult
"Going forwards": Next
Absolutely : Yes
However : But
"they are institutionally...": "I am a hypocrite, dot, dot, dot"


Please feel free to add your own.

obgraham
10th Nov 2013, 06:32
Please feel free to add your own."At this point in time" = Now
"At some subsequent time" = Then
"At a time to be determined" = Never
"Time permitting" = When hell freezes over

uffington sb
10th Nov 2013, 08:17
"Leave it with me" =. You can forget about that.

B Fraser
10th Nov 2013, 08:21
Thanks Uffington et al, it seems bloody daft to trust a driver to handle a train at 120 mph plus in all weathers but not when he's parking it inside an enormous floodlit dry shed.

How do you cope once you step foot outside the station??

I have never knowingly "step footed" anything. If you are asking how I continue my journey then I am happy to recommend London taxis, the finest in the world. :ok:

blueplume
10th Nov 2013, 08:49
Airport announcements for passengers not yet accounted for at gate with boarding imminent/in progress:

"This is your last and very final call". Time dilation in action.

When disembarking aircraft/bus/train:
"Please remember to take all your personal belongings with you".
If they are my belongings they are personal.

Generally:

"Cheers, really appreciate it, mate". Are we having a drink together? What do you appreciate? We're not mates, I have a name. "Sir" will do for this brief moment of interaction.

Use of the word "Cheers" portrays Britain's drinking culture.
Endless buying of rounds and toasting the purchaser has finally replaced the phrase "Thank you". Too many people use this word unquestioningly to express gratitude.

"Can I help you at all?" Not sure about your capability to do so. At all? What is that about?

All of the above are silly mantras taught/picked up by people trying to sound experienced and efficient through fake friendliness.

Hope we're all on the same page on this one. Christmas is coming so we should all be singing off the same hymn sheet at Midnight Mass.

2 sheds
10th Nov 2013, 09:27
Calm down dears, the words/phrases are only an expression of the English language, which is forever changing...know what I mean!

The objection is that, in this time of alleged education standards, the changes are instituted by the morons and the ignorant in society and then, apparently, accepted as common English usage.

2 s

Super VC-10
10th Nov 2013, 09:34
"Young people" - If you mean "children" then bleddy well say so! :=

blueplume
10th Nov 2013, 09:38
"Loved ones".

What's wrong with "relatives" or "friends"?

rmcb
10th Nov 2013, 10:25
When did we start 'passing away'? I'm dying to know...

blueplume
10th Nov 2013, 10:43
"For your comfort and convenience" = "we" are providing completely unnecessary and annoying "services" no one has requested or needs but which "we" know enough idiots will pay high prices for in exchange for mediocre goods and services.

The words "Health and Safety" in general grip my shit.
Used by people as an excuse to do very little or extort money for bullshit services. Example: bin men who refuse to empty bin because the lid is one inch open. The contents could fall out. Perhaps into the back of the truck if you attached it to the lifting mechanism and emptied it.
Used by councils to minimise services and work to rule.

cattletruck
10th Nov 2013, 11:23
"This phone call will be monitored for training purposes"
=
Don't say anything libelous just because our training is sh!t.

MadsDad
10th Nov 2013, 11:46
Actually, Cattletruck, the message is usually "This phone call may be monitored for training purposes"

which = "This phone call will be monitored for training purposes" as you say. Worked testing these systems for companies and they always had the recording set to 100% when installed live, as an 'ass covering' exercise, sod all to do with training. (And teed me off because a lot of the testing I did was to make sure they covered the correct number of calls for any percentage requested, so that was a waste of time).

Capetonian
10th Nov 2013, 12:02
..... but try telling someone that you are recording the call at your end, they don't like it! When I'm about to complain, I always say to the person at the other end that I hope the conversation is being recorded, so that there will be a record for their management to hear of my dissatisfaction.

UniFoxOs
10th Nov 2013, 12:13
When did we start 'passing away'? I'm dying to know...

We don't anymore - we just "pass" now.

ShyTorque
10th Nov 2013, 13:09
The objection is that, in this time of alleged education standards, the changes are instituted by the morons and the ignorant in society and then, apparently, accepted as common English usage.

So, the Olde Englishe language just appeared one day on wax sealed parchment in a ribbon-tied box, in its "correct" form?

Or has it always evolved, generation by generation, as per the above quote?

Know wha' I mean, 'Arry?

:oh:

mikedreamer787
10th Nov 2013, 13:28
"Kindly" this and "kindly" that.

Kindly pay your tax audit assessment bill of
$15,781.10 at any of our Tax offices in your
city.

No, I'll bloody RUDELY pay it with as much
obscene invective as I can possible muster! :*

Capot
10th Nov 2013, 14:45
"Loved ones".

What's wrong with "relatives" or "friends"?To me, "loved ones" has the meaning used in funeral homes, ie the corpses. We can thank Jessica Mitford and "The American Way of Death", one of the funniest books written, for that.

The nearest "loved ones" gets to "relatives" or "friends" is when it means "dead relatives" or "dead friends", probably laid out on a slab for cosmetic beautification.

So I second your choice of the phrase as profoundly irritating, but for different reasons, when used to mean live people.

My choice of a statement that invariably means the exact opposite is "I take full responsibility.....", always used after a complete cock-up for which the speaker was indeed totally responsible, but intends to do nothing about along the lines of resigning, and/or paying back a vast and unearned remuneration, or indeed anything at all apart from mouthing "I take full responsibility." to all and sundry.

Matari
10th Nov 2013, 15:36
The French say that someone "a trouvé la mort" which seems a charitable way of saying one was hit by a bus, for example.

Sunnyjohn
10th Nov 2013, 16:30
"Our prayers and thoughts are with their next of kin".
I remember the Principal of the Further Education College where I worked used to trundle this one out if some member of staff had died - sorry - passed. Actually, he was a good Principal and well respected but I suspect that he had been ordered to churn this phrase out. I often felt like producing a large poster and sticking it somewhere prominent which said, bearing in mind that we had over a thousand staff: "Your prayers and thoughts might be with them; I don't know them, while here my thoughts are on my work, and I aint religious, sunshine!'

Choxolate
10th Nov 2013, 16:34
"I am loving it" rather than I like it. Blame the McD advert.

"Epicentre" instead of centre
Epicentre is a geological term with a very specific meaning, derived from "epi" - over or above, and "centre". The point on the earth's surface vertically above the focus of an earthquake it DOES NOT mean some sort of super-centredeness, the ultimate centre or any other such sh!t.

ExRAFRadar
10th Nov 2013, 17:11
Some great ones here.

Here's one - the use of the word 'Quantum' in anything other than a Physics paper.

Actually seen in an email: "The new data center has Quantum increase in server capacity" In other words a fu*king small amount, and unless someone is looking at it, we are not sure where it is.

B Fraser
10th Nov 2013, 18:48
Agreed, quantum energy is both tiny and random. Another daft expression is a "sea change" and why do people say "me, personally" ?

JimR
10th Nov 2013, 23:33
I think (guess) I'll just have to stop talking. I can't count how many of these expressions I have used from time to time. Not that I have used them with any intention of appearing "with it" they just happen. If some of these trivial expressions annoy people, so be it.
Come to think of it though, one expression that I couldn't stand but thankfully seems to be going out of fashion was "gob-smacked"

mikedreamer787
11th Nov 2013, 00:02
1. People who post things like this in local rags:

In Memoriam

Bill Bloggs 1950 - 2010

We still miss you Billy and the
lives you touched with your
wit and humor will never be
forgotten. Love from your
devoted wife Jean.

I'm sure Mr William Bloggs gets a copy of his
favorite newspaper every morning while being
dead as a doornail and reads every word of it.


2. "Made peace with God."

How does one do that with something totally invisible
and incorporeal? :ugh:

What happens if you'd made war instead?

ehwatezedoing
11th Nov 2013, 00:13
Anyhow....

Cunning_Stunt
11th Nov 2013, 03:42
Received a parcel last week. It was seven days late. Then got an email asking if I would like to provide feedback on my "Parcel Delivery Experience".

Capetonian
11th Nov 2013, 06:04
"Thank you for reaching out to us."
Makes me want to retch!

Super VC-10
11th Nov 2013, 07:16
People who say "Deb-bree": The word is "Débris" and is pronounced "Day-bree". Note that there's only one "b" in the word. The letter "b-umlaut" does not exist.

Capetonian
11th Nov 2013, 07:25
On pronounciation, those who insist on pronouncing 'chorizo' as CHOR-IT-SO. Not as quite as bad though as the embarrassingly ignorant bunch of low class Brits in a bar in Barcelona asking for a 'bo'el of Roger like wot we got earlier'. 'Roger' turned out to mean 'Rioja'.

Smeagol
11th Nov 2013, 07:35
No-one has yet mentioned my favorite:

"Forward planning"

Is there any other kind?

Worrals in the wilds
11th Nov 2013, 08:55
No-one has yet mentioned my favorite:
"Forward planning"
Is there any other kind?True. The antonym is 'arse covering'. :E
Another personal favourite is the big retailers' insatiable desire to categorise every type of product as a Ware. Thus we now have Stemware (glasses), Tableware (plates, napkins and stuff) and Kitchenware (pots and pans).

Recent additions from major retailers are Brushware (the dustpan and broom aisle of a large grocery chain) and Treeware (Christmas decorations at a big department store). No doubt the big funeral director companies will be following along with Deadware (aka coffins) and tissue manufacturers will be moving to repackage their product as Snotware. :hmm:

fenland787
11th Nov 2013, 09:13
Unnecessary words as in "at this present moment in time" rather than "at present" or "at this time" or "at the moment"
A great example from a few weeks ago in a quote from a certain Mr Spokesman Says of the North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service:

"We would like to remind the public that whilst the river may look benign it can quickly change; in this instance the preceding rainfall from the night before caused a rapid rise in the river level in a very short period of time."

I reckon about half the words are redundant?

Wetstart Dryrun
11th Nov 2013, 09:22
'Sit back, relax and enjoy the flight'

...this is wrong on so many levels.

last valid in 1967?

wets

Fliegenmong
11th Nov 2013, 09:48
One I personally like to use, 'cos I know it confounds them is...

"Unable to provide answers to your questions at this time" :}

readily followed by (if required)...

"Unable at this time to estimate what time frame I can get back to you on"

It;s throwing their BS back at them! :D

One of the worst I ever heard was from an ex QF guy, who regurgitated the line.... "We've given you the watch, now you tell us the time" :yuk:

MagnusP
11th Nov 2013, 09:50
"Loved ones".

What's wrong with "relatives"

The former is generally only a subset of the latter.

fenland787
11th Nov 2013, 09:59
"at this difficult time" used almost universally by 'officialdom' to describe what relatives of a fatal accident or murder victim are going through.

A 'difficult time' is when your house gets flooded or your life savings get nicked. When your spouse or child is killed that is a 'tragic time' perhaps?

Worrals in the wilds
11th Nov 2013, 10:02
The former is generally only a subset of the latter. :E.
The phrases 'loved ones' and 'dearly departed' always remind me of the joke/truth that no-one ever stands up to give the eulogy at a funeral and starts it by saying 'XXX was a total self serving bastard, and quite frankly everyone's glad s/he's dead', even if XXX was the most awful person in the world. :}

To me words like 'relatives' and 'the dead/deceased' carry more weight, but maybe that's just me. I find phrases like 'loved ones', 'passing', 'passing over' etc a bit saccharine.

Super VC-10
11th Nov 2013, 11:08
'XXX was a total self serving bastard, and quite frankly everyone's glad s/he's dead', even if XXX was the most awful person in the world.

Reminds me of a funeral I went to many years ago. The coffin was laid into the grave, chief mourners started throwing their handfuls of earth in and there was a sudden flash of lightning instantaneously followed by a very loud clap of thunder. A voice from the back was heard to comment "She's got there, then!" :ooh:

vulcanised
11th Nov 2013, 11:36
This mail has been walksorted


Prsumably why I had to walk it down the road to the correct address then?

GrumpyOldFart
11th Nov 2013, 12:18
Worrals:


Another personal favourite is the big retailers' insatiable desire to
categorise every type of product as a Ware.



Do they advertise GPS units as "Whereware"? Or textbooks as "Knowware"?

sidevalve
11th Nov 2013, 14:07
Things are no longer locked up - they're locked down..
Then there's the über-annoying "see what I did there?" and "I parked up.."
Then in progs like "Escape to the Country" it appears living rooms have been replaced by living spaces. Followed by the question "Does that work for you guys?":yuk:

obgraham
11th Nov 2013, 15:46
Unnecessary words as in "at this present moment in time" rather than "at present" or "at this time" or "at the moment"
Fen: what's wrong with "now"?

rgbrock1
11th Nov 2013, 17:20
"Like". Seems to be a favorite word of the younger generation these days. As in:

"Like, we were meeting him up at the pool and he was like, well why didn't you, like, wait for me, And we were like, we waited, like, ten minutes and when you didn't show we were, like, what the heck. Maybe he, like, forgot the time or something, like.'"

Augggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

GrumpyOldFart
11th Nov 2013, 18:06
Ticks all the boxes.

TRC
11th Nov 2013, 18:46
"At the end of the day......" :rolleyes:

"With all due respect" i.e. I'm about to say something that you don't want to hear, and will probably take as an insult.

sidevalve
11th Nov 2013, 18:48
Then there are these..
Staycation, chillaxing, twerking and Movember..

baggersup
11th Nov 2013, 19:23
1. Innit.

2. We are going to doubledown (especially when it's government official numptie-speak.)

TRC
11th Nov 2013, 19:26
We are going to doubledown

WTF is that meant to mean?

radeng
11th Nov 2013, 19:37
In international meetings, "with respect Mr Chairman" is generally understood to mean " with no respect at all because you are a bumbling old fool who needs a map to show you how to wipe your ar*e after having a sh*t and can't even tie your own shoelaces without assistance AND you have just spouted a load of crap that should be ignored"

radeng
11th Nov 2013, 19:45
Manager "We don't have the bandwidth for that".

Radeng: " So how many megahertz bandwidth do we need and why?"

Manager: "Duh? What's that mean?"

Radeng: " It means you're talking meaningless crap".

That exchange happened.

It probably explains why radeng never got promoted and possibly why he had 19 managers in 32 years - and outlasted every one of them!

Although the admittedly different manager convicted of gross indecency with two other men in a public lavatory in Wootton Basset, followed 18 months later by a conviction for drunk driving in a company car (usually a dismissable offence), lasted a very long time afterwards...

chuks
12th Nov 2013, 07:35
"Like" has its defenders, because it's a useful way to say, for instance, "I said something similar to, but not exactly the same as, 'Let's go to the mall and look at girls.'"

"I was like, 'Let's go to the mall and look at girls,'" makes it clear that the speaker is not quoting exactly what he said, but more its general meaning. He might actually have said something like, "Dude, let's chillax at the mall," with the full meaning coming from things left unsaid.

"She was like, 'Gag me with a spoon,'" is pretty sophisticated. It both positions the quoted speaker in a certain milieu, and shows her mindset in a general way. Of course, to anyone over a certain age, it's completely unclear what in the hell is going on there, but that's not the fault of using this modern "like" construction.

After all, to say that "My postilion has been struck by lightning," which is perfectly grammatical English ... how many modern speakers of the language would understand what is going on there?

The problem I have with a lot of modern speech is the way that it depends on the listener having to guess the meaning of what is said. That's fine when one is chillax with one's homies, but pretty useless when one is trying cross-generational communication. I don't want to know what something is "like"; I want to know what it is, exactly! "I'm like, breakfast around 8, uh?" won't get it; I need to hear, "I want to eat breakfast at 8 a.m., please."

ex_matelot
12th Nov 2013, 07:47
misuse of reflexive pronouns by people in customer services who somehow think substituting you, me and us for yourselves, myself and ourselves at every opportunity makes them sound more formal and elegant.


Posted from Pprune.org App for Android

27mm
12th Nov 2013, 11:22
"Chairperson", or even worse, "Chair" - PC Newspeak at its worst

tony draper
12th Nov 2013, 11:33
Partner for wife or Husband,a Partner is something a Cowboy or Solicitor has.
Students for all School Children,a Student was someone attending a University,sometimes sixth former might be graced with the title Sixth Form Student but the rest were schoolchildren.
So there.
:=:rolleyes:

Lightning Mate
12th Nov 2013, 11:54
"Spokesperson"

Is that someone who rides a bicycle ?

Oh, and "defo" for "definitely".

27mm
12th Nov 2013, 14:01
LGBT - Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender

Used to be Laser Guided Bomb Training......:hmm:

obgraham
12th Nov 2013, 15:50
"Schoolgirl" or "schoolboy".

What does that fact that he/she goes to school have to do with the fact that this particular boy or girl has been kidnapped, murdered, or reported missing?

While we are on it, what's with "gone missing"? Where did she go?

ex_matelot
12th Nov 2013, 18:36
Partner for wife or Husband,a Partner is something a Cowboy or Solicitor has.

When our boy was born the midwife, when asking me to dress our baby said to my wife: "If your husband could just get him dressed...er sorry..I mean your partner". She actually corrected herself and was apologetic. No doubt some NHS policy.

Hydromet
12th Nov 2013, 19:58
Students for all School Children,a Student was someone attending a University,sometimes sixth former might be graced with the title Sixth Form Student but the rest were schoolchildren.
Oh, that we should be so fortunate. Some education bureaucrat decided that students no longer existed, and that all were, henceforth, 'learners'. Another functionary then dutifully went through all the Statistics notes and changed every occurrence of 'Student's T' to 'Learner's T'.

wings folded
12th Nov 2013, 20:13
"We will shortly be arriving at Bristol Temple Meads (or Sheringham, or wherever) where this service terminates"

No, sunshine, service could not terminate. It never even got started. Service was ruled inappropriate. Some time back.

Disabled, and with a heavy suitcase? No service. Frail and unsure of what is the right platform? No service.

Deaf, and cannot hear all the garbled threats over the tannoy? Anguishing.

Service is confined to menacing incessant messages about unattended baggage, smoking in the wild outdoors at the end of a blustery railway station platform, and our policy of intolerance to those who abuse or insult our staff.

An explanation why the sodding train is still not here? No, forget it.

vulcanised
12th Nov 2013, 21:31
Always seem to me that 'Terminal' is not a good place to start.

funfly
12th Nov 2013, 21:46
Couple of years ago I was in hospital and when they filled the form in they asked;
"and how would you like to be addressed?'
It didn't matter what name I replied 'caus all the nurses called me 'luv'.

To be honest it didn't worry me a bit!

funfly
12th Nov 2013, 21:48
Was at a Jewish funeral a number of years ago and when the coffin was in the ground all the mourners started throwing money into the hole. Most of them put in £20 notes.
Not to be out of place I wrote a cheque for £100 and took £80 quid change :O

ex_matelot
12th Nov 2013, 23:15
I don't wish to appear sycophantic but... I've yet to hear a missive from Monseiur Draper that I disagree with.

Can we therfore have a Tony Draper approved list of things thats should not be said or done?!

I reckon this could rival Christianity.

mikedreamer787
13th Nov 2013, 03:08
This "he/she" crap. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/yeees.gif

If he/she cannot accomplish the task assigned to him/her, then he/she will ask the boss if he/she minds if he/she defers the task he/she is assigned to, until he/she is told by him/her that he/she is ready to perform the task to be done by him/her. If he/she objects to him/her then he/she can appeal to him/her for more time.

Before you know it these PC dickheads will insist on "he/she/it" so as to include the basic hermaphrodite (ie sex change op gone wrong) specie.

I agree with Drapes - when I hear "Oh this is my partner Jenny" I instantly think 'Jenny' is simply his bit of fluff on the side.

mikedreamer787
13th Nov 2013, 03:21
Websites that say "Join us on Facebook". :ugh:

Worrals in the wilds
13th Nov 2013, 08:03
What does that fact that he/she goes to school have to do with the fact that this particular boy or girl has been kidnapped, murdered, or reported missing?Likewise, 'Mums' which is also beloved by journalists. 'The Mum (or Young Mum) was walking along such-and-such street when she was set apon by masked bandits'. If she weren't a Mum would it be less heinous? :hmm:

mikedreamer787
13th Nov 2013, 09:08
Yep Worrals if she wasn't a mum it would be a less heinous crime
as far as the popular media is concerned, just as if Schapelle Corby
had've been a real fugly she'd've fully deserved the death sentence.

Other journo faves -
'kiddies' (they aren't called children anymore, esp in Oz)
'flamboyant' (anyone who dresses well and has a nice car)
'mysterious' (anything your regular dumb journo can't figure out)
'shocking revelation' (anything that everybody else knew anyway)

Lightning Mate
13th Nov 2013, 09:10
"Celebrity".

TWT
13th Nov 2013, 09:23
'flamboyant' (anyone who dresses well and has a nice car)

I've always seen that used as a euphemism for someone who is a raging queen.Liberace was flamboyant.

mmmmmmmmmmm
nnnnnnnnnn

Worrals in the wilds
13th Nov 2013, 09:34
Same, TWT. Unfortunately every now and again it's used to describe a straight guy (Stefan and Napoleon Perdis spring to mind) and causes much public confusion.

Yep Worrals if she wasn't a mum it would be a less heinous crime
as far as the popular media is concerned, just as if Schapelle Corby
had've been a real fugly she'd've fully deserved the death sentence.Yep. There was barely a public (or media) murmur about another Australian who was executed in Singapore around the same time. I'm sure that had nothing to do with him being 1. Male 2. Asian and 3. Lacking big blue eyes and impressive tits. :hmm:
Van Tuong Nguyen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Tuong_Nguyen)

I.R.PIRATE
13th Nov 2013, 09:40
But really. Blue eyed and impressive titted trumps slant eyed and flat chested every day of the week.

Scoggy
13th Nov 2013, 10:44
"...their family have been informed"

I would hope they have. But I don't need this confirmed as part of the bulletin. Every time.

cattletruck
13th Nov 2013, 10:58
"Agitating, insubordinate, disrespectful to senior management, disrespectful of rules and processes, continued contempt for policy and procedures, unpredictable, uncontrollable, threatening, untrustworthy, a high degree of risk to the business, harming the company's reputation, does not accept criticism, holds irrational grudges, joker, problematic, highly unprofessional, increasingly difficult, not a team player, vindictive, destructive, paranoid, sexist, racist, and homophobic."

Interspersed phrases extracted from the HR Manager's witness statement of the previous company I worked for. :eek:

At least she got one right :E

rans6andrew
13th Nov 2013, 11:57
people who say "it is 25 times smaller". Idiots, anything multiplied by a number greater than 1 is going to be bigger.

Since when has there been a measurement of "smaller"? Size, whether length, area or volume is always a measure of "big" ness.

Rans6.....

Worrals in the wilds
13th Nov 2013, 11:59
"Agitating, insubordinate, disrespectful to senior management, disrespectful of rules and processes, continued contempt for policy and procedures, unpredictable, uncontrollable, threatening, untrustworthy, a high degree of risk to the business, harming the company's reputation, does not accept criticism, holds irrational grudges, joker, problematic, highly unprofessional, increasingly difficult, not a team player
Well thank you sir (ma'am). Your point was? By the way, here's a copy of the Fair Work Act. :E:}
Picture included for illustrative purporses only. Does not represent the FWA, just some of the pricnciples included within said Act. Said principles may or may not survive the current federal government, but definitely apply to management mud-chucking against employees who choose to speak up against company [email protected], double-think, 'affordable safety' and productivity gains ie doing the same stuff with less people while the managers take home even more exponential bonuses for just showing up. :}.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/4109490-3x2-940x627.jpg

cattletruck
13th Nov 2013, 12:39
Nice pic Worrals :ok:

BTW, that little bit jutting out forward of the building in the background was once our tea room for another company I used to work for - nice affect that slanty roof. The window cleaners had a good sense of humour too, they used to smear on the glass (ok draw) a c*ck and balls on the outside window paynes of desks they thought belonged to female employees - try getting that off on say level 39.

Worrals in the wilds
13th Nov 2013, 12:47
Small world :\.
I live in a high rise and have been surprised by (and no doubt surprised :eek:) window cleaners before. A quick chat with the nice bloke who landed on my balcony recently confirmed my suspicion that observers of the Human Condition are seldom shocked by what they see...fortunately I was doing nothing very exciting at the time. :cool:

fenland787
13th Nov 2013, 13:15
"...their family have been informed" I would hope they have. But I don't need this confirmed as part of the bulletin. Every time.No, you don't but others with kin serving need to know that, it's nerve wracking to hear of death(s) where they are serving and not hear those words.

27mm
13th Nov 2013, 14:06
"Lessons will be learned...."

Capetonian
13th Nov 2013, 14:18
"Agitating, insubordinate, disrespectful to senior management, disrespectful of rules and processes, continued contempt for policy and procedures, unpredictable, uncontrollable, threatening, untrustworthy, a high degree of risk to the business, harming the company's reputation, does not accept criticism, holds irrational grudges, joker, problematic, highly unprofessional, increasingly difficult, not a team player, vindictive, destructive, paranoid, sexist, racist, and homophobic."
We must have worked for the same HR manager at some point!

Union Jack
13th Nov 2013, 15:09
Any form of over accentuated Hingerlish Harkscent...the inflection of tone being a vain attempt to somehow impress

British people splitting infinitives - I believe that it's almost compulsory for the cousins.;)

On pronounciation, those who insist on pronouncing 'chorizo' as CHOR-IT-SO.

Misspelling, and possibly mispronouncing, words when criticising other people's English!

Both of the above examples are drawn from this very thread, and, oh yes,and following on from Fenland's post, the ever-increasing use of "at the minute" instead of "at the moment" or even "at present".

Jack

The SSK
13th Nov 2013, 15:20
Anybody so unhappy about mispronunciation of 'chorizo' must be really paranoid :)

Capetonian
13th Nov 2013, 15:24
On pronounciation, those who insist on pronouncing 'chorizo' as CHOR-IT-SO.
Well spotted. Guilty as charged.

when criticising other people's English!
This may open the debate about the positioning of the apostrophe. People's is correct as 'people' is already a plural noun, rather like the 'Children's Hospital.'

obgraham
13th Nov 2013, 15:36
While we are on Brit-speak (itself a qualifying term for this thread!):

Extraordinary.

It's "ex-tra-ordi-nary", not "ex-trord-nry" Prince Chucky is the worst offender, as it seems to be in every sentence he utters.

tow1709
13th Nov 2013, 18:01
People who describe any piece of music "a song" even when there is no vocal element at all.

As in: Beethoven's Fifth Symphony? - I just love that song.

Sunnyjohn
13th Nov 2013, 18:17
From the online dictionary:

Song:
- a short poem or other set of words set to music or meant to be sung
- a musical composition suggestive of a song.

tow1709
13th Nov 2013, 19:58
So, a song is something which is suggestive of a song.

What a useful dictionary!

mikedreamer787
13th Nov 2013, 20:41
People who describe any piece of music "a song" even when there is no vocal element at all.

As in: Beethoven's Fifth Symphony? - I just love that song.

True its not a song, but one can make it into such:


You are a bitch....
You are a bitch....

You are a bitch
Oh no I'm not
Oh yes you are
Oh no I'm not

You are a fcu-king bitch....

axefurabz
13th Nov 2013, 21:59
Talk me through it .. as said by any broadcast media [email protected]

B Fraser
13th Nov 2013, 22:06
"Please think of the environment and re-use your towel"

I have just returned from a very nice hotel where this sign was hung in the shower. To build the hotel, several acres were bulldozed and concreted over. The bathroom was lined with imported marble, the room was panelled in exotic tropical hardwood and the bedding was Egyptian cotton. I ate seafood that was flown in from fuknowswhere and drank wines from the Loire. The golf course was watered from aquifers hundreds of feet underground and of course, I consumed megatons of carbon based fuels releasing proverbial tsunamis of CO2 on the journey. The aircon ran 24 hrs a day to keep me cool.

Not having a clean towel each day given my company paid a shedload of cash for me to stay there is going to make the slightest difference...... aye right !

:ugh:

axefurabz
14th Nov 2013, 12:46
Partner for wife or Husband,a Partner is something a Cowboy or Solicitor has.My wife and I are both "professionals" and were in business in partnership for many years. I used to enjoy introducing her: "This is my partner. She also happens to be my wife" It often fell on stony ground, sad to say.

27mm
14th Nov 2013, 13:08
"Do not hesitate to contact..."

cattletruck
14th Nov 2013, 13:17
"thanking you in advance"

I prefer my thank you's on the spot as I have nowhere to store them, especially the big ones.

What about "murdering you in advance" - you never can tell, but just to be on the safe side :rolleyes:.

tony draper
14th Nov 2013, 13:20
Dentists Doctors Nurses ect
"This wont hurt a bit"
Lying bastiges
:uhoh:

MagnusP
14th Nov 2013, 13:39
No, Drapes it's the absolute truth. It'll hurt a lot! :{

And, given where I learned my rudimentary Spanish, I pronounce it cho-ree-tho. Sorry.

chuks
14th Nov 2013, 14:31
I used to tell people that "My first wife has an Ethiopian partner." She was my first and present wife, with a man from Ethiopia with whom she worked.

The way the squid emits his cloud of ink, just before jetting off in some completely different direction? Like that, actually.

mikedreamer787
14th Nov 2013, 14:57
"Do not hesitate to contact..."

Hmm should I call?

One the one hand I'd have that info now.

One the other hand if I call later.....

Bugger I'll call now.

[Ring ringggg]......

"Lo..."

"Hello yes I'm at HR Big Aviation calling about your application and...."

"Did you hesitate before calling me?"

"Pardon?"

"Did you hesitate before calling me?"

"Well yes but I was considering the time zones and...."

"YOU HESITATED! DON'T EVER TRY TO CONTACT ME AGAIN!" [clunk!]

GrumpyOldFart
14th Nov 2013, 16:44
Drapes:


Dentists Doctors Nurses ect
"This wont hurt a bit"
Lying bastiges



Yeah, but when some of them say "Just a little prick with a needle" they're actually telling the truth.

Like one of my former doctors, f'rinstance. Proper little bastige, he was.

ExSp33db1rd
14th Nov 2013, 20:41
"It's OK, it's organic"

4mastacker
14th Nov 2013, 20:57
"Tell us, what more do we know?" said by TV news readers to the on-the-spot reporter. I pray for the day when OTSR says "**** all really!"

Captain Sand Dune
14th Nov 2013, 21:22
Partner for wife or Husband, a Partner is something a Cowboy or Solicitor has.
"Spouse", "significant other". :yuk: I insist on referring to the Mrs as my wife......coz that's what she is!!

And "totes" (totally), sweet (pronounced "schweeeet!")

axefurabz
14th Nov 2013, 21:57
"Tell us, what more do we know?" said by TV news readers to the on-the-spot reporter. I pray for the day when OTSR says "**** all really!" Quite agree but I'm pretty sure that's happened already - just never been <cough> "aired"

mikedreamer787
15th Nov 2013, 05:34
"Dear" and "yours faithfully":

Dear Bill,

I hate your guts. I'm leaving you for your
best make Jack who I've been screwing
for the past two years behind your back.

Yours faithfully,

Martha

Capetonian
15th Nov 2013, 05:42
False or what?
Dear Mr. X

Kindly note that your account shows arrears of £xxxx. Unless this is paid within 5 working days, we will regretfully be obliged to resort to legal action for relief.

Please be assured of our best attention at all times.

Yours sincerely

xxxxx

ExRAFRadar
15th Nov 2013, 05:45
Dear Bill,

I hate your guts. I'm leaving you for your
best make Jack who I've been screwing
for the past two years behind your back.

Yours faithfully,

MarthaYou are a bitch....
You are a bitch....

You are a bitch
Oh no I'm not
Oh yes you are
Oh no I'm not

You are a fcu-king bitch....Mike - seeing a bit of a theme in your posts mate.:D

innuendo
15th Nov 2013, 05:49
"Please listen carefully to the following selections as they have been changed recently, etc. etc." Complete bolleaux, they have been the same for ages :*:*

Worrals in the wilds
15th Nov 2013, 05:52
True. Also, the phone system computers where you can theoretically 'make your selection just by speaking.' I don't know what accent they were all designed for, but it sure wasn't mine. :ugh::ugh:
Mike - seeing a bit of a theme in your posts mate.:D
Agreed. Everything okay? :ooh:

mikedreamer787
15th Nov 2013, 13:04
Bit of a tense marital moment lately in the Dreamer household Worrals.... :(

ZOOKER
15th Nov 2013, 15:57
I don't think it has appeared yet, but 'sustainable' is a personal favourite. I see Mr. Stobart is now "Delivering Sustainable Distribution", rather than doing road-haulage'
At a recent exhibition regarding a housing estate which is to be built on AVRO's airfield site, the developers display boards used 'sustainable' 39 times.
Oh, and 'Chief Operating Officer'.

ZOOKER
15th Nov 2013, 16:12
And another thing………..
'Caught on Camera'.

FullOppositeRudder
15th Nov 2013, 21:53
"You have an absolutely terrific day..."

(Buggerit! I'll have whatever sort of day I damn well want! )

Cyber Bob
16th Nov 2013, 07:55
"Lol" - after many a 'Dead Leg' CB Junior doesn't say this any more in my presence.

You should try it - worked in my house

mikedreamer787
16th Nov 2013, 22:15
"My bad". WTF is that shit?

blueplume
16th Nov 2013, 23:11
Journalists writing about people having their head cut off and referring to "decapitated heads".

North Shore
17th Nov 2013, 05:03
Worrals:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Avp9aUkM5g0

mikedreamer787
17th Nov 2013, 11:56
Dorks who refer to others as "people".

"Listen up people."
"What's happening in here people?"
"Let's chill out people."

Gets up my nose something fierce.

Nopax,thanx
17th Nov 2013, 17:03
In the coffee shop...

"Expresso"

NO IT ISN'T :* there ain't no such thing!


Yes, I know, there are bigger things to get annoyed over....

SpringHeeledJack
17th Nov 2013, 17:32
In the coffee shop...

"Expresso"

NO IT ISN'T there ain't no such thing!

There is such a thing, it means "make my coffee quicker than possible!" ;)

My ears become offended when I hear (in the coffee shop) Caf-ay Lar-tay! It's a bloody Eyetalian word and it's Latte, pronounced Lat-tay :*:)


SHJ

Persia
17th Nov 2013, 17:36
Upskilling.

This replaces....training.

You heard it first here.

I think I have now upskilled you.:E

Sunnyjohn
17th Nov 2013, 17:45
"Completely wired"
I have no idea what it means. Perhaps someone could enlighten me . . .

Persia
17th Nov 2013, 17:53
Well, you got to 'drill down', sunnyjohn.

You will benefit from some upskilling going forward.

Sunnyjohn
17th Nov 2013, 18:03
OK, Persia, but you'll have to unpick it for me.

Blues&twos
17th Nov 2013, 20:23
Nopax, Thanx this is for you.

That Mitchell and Webb Look Series 4 - Episode 1 (Grammar Nazi) - YouTube

Worrals in the wilds
17th Nov 2013, 22:22
North Shore,:D:D.
"Expresso"
I thought that was purely a redneck regional Queensland thing! :\

mikedreamer787
19th Nov 2013, 00:34
More like a FNQ regional redneck thing Worrals, ay.

Matari
19th Nov 2013, 00:42
#firstworldproblems

sidevalve
19th Nov 2013, 06:47
My ears become offended when I hear (in the coffee shop) Caf-ay Lar-tay! It's a bloody Eyetalian word and it's Latte, pronounced Lat-tay
When Afghanistan was on the news every night, the Beeb newsreaders insisted on referring to the Taliban and Kabul as the "Talibarn" and "Karble"..

TWT
19th Nov 2013, 08:07
"It is what it is"

ex_matelot
19th Nov 2013, 10:03
When Afghanistan was on the news every night, the Beeb newsreaders insisted on referring to the Taliban and Kabul as the "Talibarn" and "Karble"..

If I remember rightly, The BBC went through a phase of over emphasising Arabic place names or people's names..Bahrain etc. Ended up sounding like "Bah Accchhhhhhrain".

Lightning Mate
19th Nov 2013, 10:38
"level playing field". :ugh:

The SSK
19th Nov 2013, 10:56
"level playing field".

Yeovil Town FC, n'est ce pas?

Used to win cup-ties against illustrious opposition not used to playing up and down a slope

27mm
21st Nov 2013, 09:35
"Hi, how are you.." - more and more prevalent in England, sounding especially silly when greeted at the doc's or the dentist.

"Does that make sense..." unnecessarily added to the end of an instruction.

:rolleyes:

ex_matelot
21st Nov 2013, 10:25
"Lets wait for the report first..." Normally said by someone on R&N after having themselves spent the past 50 posts pontificating about possible causes of whatever.

Worrals in the wilds
21st Nov 2013, 11:36
And shortly before they start posting random Met Reports. :}

ex_matelot
21st Nov 2013, 12:54
And shortly before they start posting random Met Reports

A report of the current METARS should be posted by post number 5 - regardless of the nature of the incident. It's the law!

ehwatezedoing
21st Nov 2013, 16:44
"But what do I know"

It sound hypocrite, arrogant and condescending.