PDA

View Full Version : Snaky Substance proves global warming


OFSO
7th Nov 2013, 16:03
I took this photograph five minutes ago outside my house. OK so it's only a teensy-weensy snake but I have never seen a snake of any size out so late in the year....

http://i656.photobucket.com/albums/uu287/ROBIN_100/IMAG0412_WEB_zps550e98c6.jpg

lomapaseo
7th Nov 2013, 17:43
Can you rotate that picture so the snake doesn't appear to be climbing a solid wall ?

OFSO
7th Nov 2013, 19:33
No because it is not an appearance: it is climbing a pillar marking the edge of the road and yes it is climbing vertically.

500N
7th Nov 2013, 19:46
OFSO

Where do you live ?

We are just getting into snake season here in Melbourne
with the usual stories on the news. A lady had a lucky one
the other day, a double strike on her leg from a Brown snake,
very poisonous but luckily it didn't inject any venom.

She would have been in a world of hurt if it had.

tony draper
7th Nov 2013, 19:53
Tsk tsk Mr 500n,snakes are not poisonous they are venomous,however there is one poisonous snake in that you would die if you ate it but I forget its name now.
Erudition gained by watching QI
:rolleyes:

Hydromet
7th Nov 2013, 20:37
She would have been in a world of hurt if it had. Probably not, initially, although she may well have been dead. I have it on good authority that an eastern brown envenomation is pretty well painless. It's usually only a small scratch, and doesn't sting. People have been bitten by them and not known, as in this recent case (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/woman-bitten-by-a-snake-while-gardening-may-not-have-realised-expert-says/story-e6frg6n6-1226753838984).

500N
7th Nov 2013, 20:40
Hydro

She didn't know until she saw some blood on her lower leg,
washed it off and noticed 4 holes (bite marks).

Worrals in the wilds
7th Nov 2013, 23:17
True Hydromet but (as I'm sure you know), if they envenomate you're in a whole world of hurt a short time after :uhoh:.

My cousin copped a venemous bite and didn't feel it; fortunately he mentioned to his son that he'd brushed against a brown snake because he then dropped to the floor unconscious. They choppered him to one of the big Brisbane hospitals where they pumped him full of antevenene and saved his life. He told me they'd told him he was about 15 minutes from death when they got to him, and he's not an excitable, exaggerating kind of bloke.

He took about two months (from memory) to recover, and still has permanent kidney damage from the venom.

The impression I get is that most of the time they'll bite but not envenomate, so people get off lightly. He inadvertently cornered the snake and we think it got scared.

I know they have a reputation for being aggressive, but I've come across plenty in SE Qld over the years and never found it to be so. However, if they decide you're their number one threat then look out :eek:.

500N
7th Nov 2013, 23:20
Agree, haven't found the few I have come across as aggressive.

But as you say, don't corner them or make you the No 1 threat.

I tend to let them be unless they are near a farm house etc.

500N
7th Nov 2013, 23:35
Go up bush in Vic around now onwards, you see plenty of snakes
sunning themselves on rocks.

ricardian
8th Nov 2013, 00:09
No snakes in Orkney, no predators at all. Chickens & ducks can be safely left out at night.

Worrals in the wilds
8th Nov 2013, 00:23
No foxes or feral cats either?
You guys are lucky.

probes
8th Nov 2013, 06:59
if there are no snakes, foxes or feral cats, there will be mosquitos (even without malaria they're not the kindest creation). Just to remind you you're a guest in the Wild World. :sad:

Yamagata ken
8th Nov 2013, 08:43
I met plenty of snakes when I was geologising in Australia. I used to wear gaiters, so they never particularly worried me, except when I was climbing in steep terrain. I didn't want to come face to face with a snake at eye level. I had an adder swim past me when I was dangling my feet in Thames at Reading, once. I've also disturbed a snake under the cover of a stoptap here in Japan. It eyed me then slid backwards down the hole from whence it came.

MagnusP
8th Nov 2013, 08:48
Sydney Redbacks or Funnelwebs or summat

Ooooh! Major difference there. Better get the Flick spider ID chart.

Worrals in the wilds
8th Nov 2013, 09:29
Ooooh! Major difference there. Better get the Flick spider ID chart.
Having been bitten by a redback I can safely assure you that it was on my Reverse Bucket List; i.e. experiences I really didn't want to have before I died. :ouch:
I met plenty of snakes when I was geologising in Australia.

Agree re the eye level encounter. Most Aussie rock climbers have a tale or two wrt this. :eek:

My closest personal call was while bushwalking off-track in the D'Aguilar National Park. Funnily enough it's not terribly remote (if you get lost you just walk downhill until you end up in someone's backyard, then ask them what their address is so you can call a taxi :\) but it's scrubby. I was practising compass nav and striding uphilll singing the 'high on the hill' song when some clever part of my hindbrain said 'where's that foot going, girl?' :ooh: I certainly hadn't consciously seen anything.

Anyway, said foot was about to tread on a very fat and grumpy looking king brown that seemed to come out of nowhere. For a second we both looked at each other and then went for the mutual 'looking :cool: and bolting' hasty retreat. IME snakes will take the coward's option if they can, as long as they have somewhere to bolt to. If they don't see that option then it's Rescue 500 time. :uhoh:

Hydromet
8th Nov 2013, 09:43
Most Australian snakes aren't aggressive unless a) they are cornered, or b) it's cold and they don't have the energy to escape. I've been told taipans are an exception, but don't have any personal experience.

Had to catch a brown that was in a laundry once. I watched it go from the floor, up through the washing machine and along a water pipe attached to the wall. It fell off into a shower basin. I went in, held the bag down for him and he went straight in. At the other end of the scale I've had them make multiple strikes at the bag, sometimes there's a drop of venom, sometimes not.

Red bellied blacks are interesting, one of the most venomous snakes in the world, but no recorded adult deaths. They are the greatest camouflage experts around, and can squeeze into a small crack so they are almost impossible to find.

500N
8th Nov 2013, 09:45
"if there are no snakes, foxes or feral cats, there will be mosquitos (even without malaria they're not the kindest creation). Just to remind you you're a guest in the Wild World. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/puppy_dog_eyes.gif"

That's why you take a lily white POM along when you go out bush :O

I know, I used to be one :p and they love that juicy soft white flesh
over hard, leathery, tanned Aussie flesh !!!

500N
8th Nov 2013, 09:51
"Red bellied blacks are interesting,"

One of only two snakes I have shot was a RBB.

Walking across a flooded wood hunting ducks, water interspersed
with higher bits of ground. I didn't see it as it was stationary and well
camouflaged in the water / twigs, got within about 3 - 4 feet of it
and it rose up and struck at me.

Normally I let them be and slither away.

Deaf
8th Nov 2013, 11:40
Tigers will attack. Was walking past a cutting on a jeep track and a 6'6" tiger struck and bit the sleeve of my shirt - hence I can talk about it.

tony draper
8th Nov 2013, 11:47
Remember seeing a thing about Tigers,apparently they do not like to attack from the front,ie they prefer to sneak up and pounce on your back,so workers in the forest where Tigers held sway took to wearing a human face mask on the back of their heads,apparently it worked quite well,or so the bloke on the telly said.
:uhoh:

MagnusP
8th Nov 2013, 11:54
Sure that wasn't the Tamil Tigers, FSL? Always had them down as two-faced buggas.

tony draper
8th Nov 2013, 11:59
Personally one would not venture among Tigers wearing anything less than a armoured car.:uhoh:

Fliegenmong
8th Nov 2013, 12:22
Saw a few rats run along far back fence the other week, made me hopeful there were no snakes about...

...terrified of the things, terrified....have always said rather be in the water with a shark than in a room with a snake

WITW, exactly why you won't find me in the bush!!! (D'Aguilar Park story) :eek:

Remember Dad always said to me there are no snakes at the beach......but there's been plenty of Eastern Browns in the Newspapers at the beach, and at Byron Bay plenty of signs warning they're around, Death adders reside around the Pottsville area, or so a vet I know tells me....

Curiously enough Dad is in Morocco right now and sent a picture of a snake charmer in a market square just this evening......apparently a charmer was bit and killed just 2 days earlier

OFSO
8th Nov 2013, 13:47
Loma, went out later, it had reached the top of the pillar.

Was talking to our local wild-boar hunter this morning (he 50% Glaswegan and sounds like the Big Yin when he speaks Scottish) - confirmed he's never heard of snakes being out so late in the year here in Catalunia. Says we need a certified night-shooter to exterminate our wild boar which are haunting our urbanisation.

1DC
8th Nov 2013, 16:00
Went to a place in Vic. Oz once , Werribbee I think and the local newspaper office had a selection of headlines from a flood that had occurred some years earlier. One article was about some workers who had been sent to repair a footbridge over a creek on the edge of town. They saw a tiger snake and sent for the snake catcher.When the catcher had finished he had caught 22 all in the vicinity of where they were working..
Been going to Oz for about 10 years and have seen five snakes, one was dead and i was told one was a red bellied black snake. All of the ones that were moving were going away from us, and for that matter shortly after we saw them we were going away from them!!
Youngest daughter lives in Melbourne and we often red back spiders in her garden. I once went into the bedroom and their was a black spider on the bed, without much thought i went and got a piece of kitchen paper and chucked it outside. Found out it was a Victorian funnel web, been careful ever since.

500N
8th Nov 2013, 16:12
Making plenty of noise when you re walking through the bush helps to move the snakes along before you get to them.


1DC
Werribee is well known as full of snakes, the River and Skeleton Creek
have always been full of snakes, especially Browns and Tigers.
In fact, was talking with a couple who now live net door to my GF.
Asked why they moved, she said she found 3 snakes in the garden
in 18 months and with kids, decided to get away from Skeleton Creek !!!
(I have lived 400 yards from it for 25 years !!!)

flying lid
8th Nov 2013, 16:18
Snakes - How about this set of ultra venomous creepy crawlies.

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2010/5/13/1273734507682/David-Cameron-chairs-the--006.jpg

500N
8th Nov 2013, 16:21
Yep.

King Brown in the middle just about to strike.

Golden Striped snake next to it !

Death Adders all around ;)

tony draper
8th Nov 2013, 21:26
Apropos this, just mentioned on QI, if one is confronted by a serpent one should stand perfectly still because apparently after a second they simply forget you are there.
Oh yer,
Bet it doesn't work wi Spiders.:uhoh:
Look here it works on Black Rhinos.
Personally I think this was the sub species,Sissy Black Rhino.:rolleyes:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FV6or4iOifs

Hydromet
9th Nov 2013, 06:16
Making plenty of noise when you re walking through the bush helps to move the snakes along before you get to them.Not exactly, as they don't have ears. But they are very sensitive to ground vibration, so walking heavily will usually have them on their way.

Had an 'interesting' experience with an RBB that was seen in a garden. The home owner was sure it hadn't moved from a patch of shrubbery, so we carefully cleared until there was only a small patch left. As we carefully cleared the last of it, the snake shot out, I stepped back and fell on my @rse, with my feet pointing directly towards the snake. Now RBBs, when scared, like nothing better to slide into a dark hole, not unlike a trouser leg. To say I stood up in a hurry is an understatement.

500N
9th Nov 2013, 07:40
Hydromet

That's what I meant.

I sometimes stamp my feet if out bush (and not hunting).

Worrals in the wilds
9th Nov 2013, 09:31
Now RBBs, when scared, like nothing better to slide into a dark hole, not unlike a trouser leg. To say I stood up in a hurry is an understatement. ROFLMAO. :E

Although their bite isn't fatal, the joke from people who've experienced it is 'for a week or so, you wish it had been.' :ooh: I heard it described as like the worst ever hangover x 100 and ongoing for seven days. :ouch:

I've always used the noisy walk method and it usually works, but not always. Snakes themselves make a surprising amount of noise when they're travelling through undergrowth, but unfortunately they like to have regular snoozes :suspect:. Given their excellent camouflauge that can lead to some close encounters if you're not vigilant. I'm regularly amazed at how well they blend in, even in quite urban environments.

Many people who are bitten by venomous snakes were chasing them, harassing them or trying to be Steve Irwin :rolleyes:. Like dark alleys, large angry men in nightclub precincts and deserted cash machines at 2AM, if you quietly walk on past, most of the time there's no problem.
I've been told taipans are an exception, but don't have any personal experience.Me neither, but an Army mate was on an exercise up at Shoalwater Bay tooling along in a Light Armoured Vehicle when they saw what looked like a pole sticking up in the middle of the track. Closer inspection found it to be a taipan, very grouchy and not in the mood to move. Even allowing for the inevitable 'it was this big' exaggeration factor, it was very large, extremely aggressive and not in the least bit scared of the vehicle. He said there was a metre of snake sticking up and another metre or so lying on the ground. :ouch:

They went around it.

Hydromet
9th Nov 2013, 22:34
Although their bite isn't fatal, the joke from people who've experienced it is 'for a week or so, you wish it had been.'
Yep, I've heard the same.
I suspect that the reason there haven't been any RBB fatalities is that they usually shoot through or hide, rather than hang around and bite.
I heard from a woman who'd survived a king brown bite that she had severe necrosis around the bite for some time afterwards.

racedo
9th Nov 2013, 23:09
As we carefully cleared the last of it, the snake shot out, I stepped back and fell on my @rse, with my feet pointing directly towards the snake. Now RBBs, when scared, like nothing better to slide into a dark hole, not unlike a trouser leg. To say I stood up in a hurry is an understatement.

Good job you not a girlie going commando............
yup that one I deserve a slap.

Hate snakes...............see nothing good in them.

owen meaney
9th Nov 2013, 23:28
Reference the Red Belly Black snakes
A most beautiful creature, for an adult effect of the venom is similar to drinking a bottle of OP rum, a small child or elderly person may die.
On the up side, they are one of the few creatures that can eat cane toads.
I had several living in my lower dam in SEQ, no cane toads.

500N
10th Nov 2013, 00:15
racedo

You deserve a slap for that one :O

Fliegenmong
10th Nov 2013, 06:07
"On the up side, they are one of the few creatures that can eat cane toads."

I did not know that!

....I like nothing more than to see a Kookaburra make off with a snake, breaking it's neck! :ok: Onya Kooky!! :ok: One less snake :ok:

probes
10th Nov 2013, 06:28
You should write books, Worrals! :D:)