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Nervous SLF
7th Nov 2013, 02:37
See this link for pictures:- What the world would look like if all ice melted - Yahoo! New Zealand (http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/world/19723617/what-the-world-would-look-like-if-all-ice-melted/)





If all of the ice in the world melted, sea levels would raise some 216 feet. But what exactly would that look like? And
more specifically, what would such a worse-case scenario mean for the Earth’s population?
National Geographic (http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map) has created a fascinating visual representation of this thought experiment and provided an analysis
of how each continent would be affected by such a catastrophic change.
First off, this is not a blanket statement about climate change.
As National Geographic notes, even scientists tracking the melting of ice around the world say it would take some 5,000 years
for all the world’s ice to melt.
Still, it’s interesting to look at exactly what would happen if this scenario was taken to its most extreme conclusion.
As a result of the drastic rise in sea levels, the average temperature around the Earth would rise from 58 degrees to 80 degrees.

galaxy flyer
7th Nov 2013, 02:58
Looks like an improvement for the most part, then again we won't see it. Think back 5,000 years, how different humans and the Earth was.

500N
7th Nov 2013, 03:02
"As a result of the drastic rise in sea levels, the average temperature around the Earth would rise from 58 degrees to 80 degrees."

56 to 80 degrees.

One would hope that the temperature would evaporate off a fair amount of the water ?

John Eacott
7th Nov 2013, 03:50
"As a result of the drastic rise in sea levels, the average temperature around the Earth would rise from 58 degrees to 80 degrees."

56 to 80 degrees.

One would hope that the temperature would evaporate off a fair amount of the water ?

Fahrenheit.... :p

bosnich71
7th Nov 2013, 03:54
Time for Flannery and Julia to think about putting their houses on the market then.

West Coast
7th Nov 2013, 04:09
San Fran underwater, I have something to look forward to.

Worrals in the wilds
7th Nov 2013, 05:00
Fahrenheit....
I made the same goof...:O
Interesting article.

500N
7th Nov 2013, 05:07
John

I didn't make a goof as Worrals put it.

The evaporation factor increases substantially as you get over that 20 degrees.

VP959
7th Nov 2013, 06:15
Evaporation makes no change to sea level, all it would do is increase precipitation.

The net result of a big rise like this would be much greater rainfall, so there would be a double whammy, as the areas of land that remain, particularly around the tropical belt, would have extensive rainfall-driven flooding to cope with, as well as the temperature rise and loss of land area.

mister hilter
7th Nov 2013, 06:19
Can someone help this sceptic, please?

216 ft all around the world is a lot of water, so where does it all come from? Has anyone got a link to show how this figure is arrived at?

I was thinking about a glass full of ice or snow that melts. The glass isn't full of water after it has melted, but somewhat below full.
So all the melted ice has to fill up the holes where it's come from and then another 216 ft on top?

PTT
7th Nov 2013, 06:25
All the seaborne ice will cause little change, as you say. It's the snow and ice sitting on the land - mainly places like the Antarctic where the ice is, on average, 7000ft thick (http://www.antarcticconnection.com/shopcontent.asp?type=weather-snow-ice) - which causes the rise.

VP959
7th Nov 2013, 06:33
A lot of the ice at the poles is very deep and ice is only slightly less dense than water, especially the deep ice under the really big glaciers and ice sheets that has little trapped air.

The Antarctic continent, for example, is covered by an ice sheet that is up to 3000m thick in places, and the whole of the Arctic is an ice sheet, there is no underlying continent there.

In volume terms, ice has a volume that's roughly 17% more per unit mass than water, so every cubic metre of ice would release around 0.85 cubic metres of water as it melted.

Mel Effluent
7th Nov 2013, 09:32
You are all missing the point. How am I going to be able to enjoy a gin and tonic if there is no ice left?

500N
7th Nov 2013, 09:36
Mel

I'm with you.

We'll have to set up some Solar panels to make Electricity
to run the freezer to make the ice :ok:

tony draper
7th Nov 2013, 09:44
Breed billions of more fish and they would drink the excess water.:rolleyes:

coldair
7th Nov 2013, 10:00
Breed billions of more fish and they would drink the excess water

Well done Tony ;-)


Or start now, putting in drains alongside coasts liable to flooding to drain the flood water away.



coldair

OFSO
7th Nov 2013, 10:27
500N beat me to it.

No ice for the Pimms on a hot summer day ! The end of civilisation as we know it. Have to learn French and drink Ricards......

goudie
7th Nov 2013, 10:29
Looking on the bright side, I wont have so far to drive to the seaside. Always wanted to live by the sea.

The SSK
7th Nov 2013, 10:30
According to Earth Tools my house is 190.3 feet above sea level.

Luckily I have three floors so I'll be OK.

GrumpyOldFart
7th Nov 2013, 11:21
Goodbye Slough.

SASless
7th Nov 2013, 11:29
If all the ice melted......then it would look like the typical English Bar.:E


Shame we would be a few feet shy of covering the State Capitol.....but the very good news is Washington DC would be about 200 feet under water! As slow as Congress moves on anything but giving themselves Perks....we would see this event as being a very positive one as it would do away with the current crop of Tossers.

Airborne Aircrew
7th Nov 2013, 11:41
You're all missing a huge positive...

There's be some of the most amazing diving ever... :ok:

Worrals in the wilds
7th Nov 2013, 11:44
Too true...
http://alsolikelife.com/shooting/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/ai53.jpg

Matari
7th Nov 2013, 11:45
Something goofy about that map.

Why does Australia's Lake Eyre increase massively in size, while the African and North American Great Lakes remain essentially the same? The Amazon watershed is huge, but the Congo watershed, which receives rainfall all year (on both sides of the equator) remains the same? I would think a massive lake would develop around the old Stanley pool, swallowing up both Brazzaville and Kinshasa, which might not be an altogether bad thing.

Call me a cynic, but maybe this map was drawn to play to the fears of coastal dwellers in Europe and N. America?

Airborne Aircrew
7th Nov 2013, 11:47
Matari:

I'm up here in the Great Lakes. My GPS tells me I'm about 640' feet AMSL...

Worrals in the wilds
7th Nov 2013, 11:49
You may be right.
Certainly whenever Lake Eyre increases in size there's a massive increase in local tourism and corresponding prices.
Lake Eyre Yacht Club (http://www.lakeeyreyc.com/)
Probably not what the report's authors had in mind...:}

Limeygal
7th Nov 2013, 12:43
Bugga. My house will be underwater. Time for new wellies

vaqueroaero
7th Nov 2013, 13:09
The answer is to simply kill all marine life. Just think if, for example we killed all the whales, then through the theory of displacement the water levels would drop. They're big animals you know.

er340790
7th Nov 2013, 13:13
Suits me...

BRING IT ON!!!!!! :E

4mastacker
7th Nov 2013, 13:21
At least all those prospective illegals will have further to swim.

Solid Rust Twotter
7th Nov 2013, 13:57
Africa's great lakes are around 3000' to 4000' AMSL IIRC.

G-CPTN
7th Nov 2013, 14:29
My house is 135ft AMSL and I am 27 miles from the coast..

AFAICT the floodmap doesn't reflect this (ie the flood isn't showing reaching me).

indiscipline_girl
7th Nov 2013, 14:38
So what would it look like if sea level went down by 216ft?

Apparently the average depth of the English channel (La Manche) is 206ft so England and France would get joined together.

I guess the tourist industry in Venice might be affected too.

Presumably the Dutch would be quite pleased about it.

G-CPTN
7th Nov 2013, 14:45
The solution to rising sea levels would be electrolysis to convert the excess liquid into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen.

Releasing these gases into the atmosphere would combat the increase in CO2, Shirley?

BenThere
7th Nov 2013, 14:47
A much warmer atmosphere would hold much more H2O aloft.

Cacophonix
7th Nov 2013, 14:47
(http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/527229-what-world-would-look-like-if-all-ice-melted.html)What the world would look like if all ice melted (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/527229-what-world-would-look-like-if-all-ice-melted.html) (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/527229-what-world-would-look-like-if-all-ice-melted.html)

Bloody appalling without ice to put in one's G&T!

Caco

con-pilot
7th Nov 2013, 14:52
I thought according to the Algore, the sea level is already supposed to be 200 feet higher. :p

MagnusP
7th Nov 2013, 14:58
Thought he'd bought a beachfront property?

If he could dance, would he be an algorerhythm?

con-pilot
7th Nov 2013, 15:03
Thought he'd bought a beachfront property?

Why yes he did and the flies to it in his noisy, high emissions producing G-III*.

But he does care for the 'little people' and the environment. :p



* Not to mention fuel guzzling.

airship
7th Nov 2013, 16:34
airship's more immediate and pressing problem is to find the funds to build a small, but self-sufficient (being remote and relying on solar and wind-power) abode at least 500m above current west Mediterranean sea-levels.

Not because of any imminent sea-level rise due to global-warming, but the fecking Ø50-250m asteroid or comet that SPACEGUARD fails to detect before it's too late, and quite probably in my own remaining life-time (at least well before all the polar ice-caps melt), landing in the sea between southern Europe and north Africa, generating a huge tsunami approx. 100-200m high and generally wiping out all life and infrastructure on the coast (particularly where one currently lives in a 1st floor apartment).

Such an asteroid or comet could equally well land in the ocean off Miami. Or New York. Or in the English channel. The folks living in the vicinity of some parts of the north-western USA might be able to inform you of the traces of 100m+ high tsunamis experienced there over the past few centuries...

Damn it. I'm not your usual south-eastern USA HillBillie survivalist who train and equip themselves to fight general chaos in the event that a black American is ever elected as President...?! :ok:

500N
7th Nov 2013, 16:48
airship

I had to chuckle at the description of that large Russian meteorite that they didn't see coming.

The description said they didn't see it because it came out from behind the glare of the sun !!!

I agree though, a large meteorite crashing into the sea close to a large population centre is more likely in the next few hundred years.

lomapaseo
7th Nov 2013, 17:38
suppose all the ice didn't just melt but instead just slid into the sea. Wouldn't the rise of the sea level be just as much ?

rgbrock1
7th Nov 2013, 17:39
500N wrote:

I agree though, a large meteorite crashing into the sea close to a large population centre is more likely in the next few hundred years.

Which is why it might behoove us to start building the world's largest baseball mitt in order to catch the wayward meteorite and toss it back at 'em. :}

DX Wombat
7th Nov 2013, 17:56
Goodbye Slough.Sir John Betjeman would be delighted. Me? Well I live just a little under 1,000' up in the Pennines but 80+ miles from the seaside so for me and the dogs trips to the beach would be much easier. :ok: :D

Slough - by Sir John Betjeman
Come friendly bombs and fall on Slough!
It isn't fit for humans now,
There isn't grass to graze a cow.
Swarm over, Death!

Come, bombs and blow to smithereens
Those air -conditioned, bright canteens,
Tinned fruit, tinned meat, tinned milk, tinned beans,
Tinned minds, tinned breath.

Mess up the mess they call a town-
A house for ninety-seven down
And once a week a half a crown
For twenty years.

And get that man with double chin
Who'll always cheat and always win,
Who washes his repulsive skin
In women's tears:

And smash his desk of polished oak
And smash his hands so used to stroke
And stop his boring dirty joke
And make him yell.

But spare the bald young clerks who add
The profits of the stinking cad;
It's not their fault that they are mad,
They've tasted Hell.

It's not their fault they do not know
The birdsong from the radio,
It's not their fault they often go
To Maidenhead

And talk of sport and makes of cars
In various bogus-Tudor bars
And daren't look up and see the stars
But belch instead.

In labour-saving homes, with care
Their wives frizz out peroxide hair
And dry it in synthetic air
And paint their nails.

Come, friendly bombs and fall on Slough
To get it ready for the plough.
The cabbages are coming now;
The earth exhales.

probes
7th Nov 2013, 18:30
The answer is to simply kill all marine life. Just think if, for example we killed all the whales, then through the theory of displacement the water levels would drop. They're big animals you know.
:) plus ground all ships, submarines and swimmers, especially the overweight?

bosnich71
8th Nov 2013, 02:30
Indiscipline girl ...."So what would it look like if the sea level went down" etc......

It would make drilling for oil in the North Sea a little bit easier, and cheaper !

Oktas8
8th Nov 2013, 04:40
Those maps are just drawn around elevation contours. But I think the sea (and increased rainfall, etc) would cause substantial erosion, which changes the contours. So it would likely be worse than that picture.

Time to find a family seat high up and on rocky ground, methinks.

On the plus side, although not shown on that picture, most of the world's politicians would end up with no offices to waste time in. That's got to be good.

mikedreamer787
10th Nov 2013, 13:56
I notice Tasmania would remain essentially intact. :rolleyes:

SpannerInTheWerks
10th Nov 2013, 17:58
Essex girls ... gone!!! :sad:

Pappa Smurf
10th Nov 2013, 22:07
Seem to recall reading if the annual melting of ice in Greenland or Iceland didn't happen the sea level would drop.
Also the experts said last 2 years floods in Qld,a lot of water flowed inland eventually ending up in Lake Eyre(below sea level)thus having a effect and causing the sea level to drop,maybe only a poofteenth of bugger all anyway.

Maybe a chance to sell a fridge to an Eskimo after all in years to come.

cockney steve
10th Nov 2013, 22:20
just how deep the ice-caps are, is totally irrelevant....it's the average height above sea-level , that's important....when you correct thisfor density, I fail to see the doomsayer's figures being realistic. If , on top of that, you do a correction for the density of the mass below sea-level, the depth of flooding scenario looks even more dubious.

vested interests are pulling our collective chain...I for one, am not buying the line at all.(don't give a damn anyway, 'cos I live up high.