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chiglet
5th Nov 2013, 23:18
It has to be "Educating Archie"
For those who don't know, said prog was broadcast on't wireless. [radio] and it was about a ventriloquist [Peter Brough] and his dummy..... Archie
It were great fun, wasn't it?

Nervous SLF
6th Nov 2013, 00:21
I loved that prog when I was a young nipper :ok:

chevvron
6th Nov 2013, 00:39
Peter Brough and Archie Andrews. Enjoyed 'Educating Archie' on the wireless but when we got a telly, it never seemed as good.(think it was on ITV - channel 9, Associated Redifusion weekdays, Granada at weekends so maybe not in all regions.)

Krystal n chips
6th Nov 2013, 05:59
Time and technology move on however.....enter, for example ( only ever to be viewed for, ahem, " amusement" when all else fails ) "Dog--Bounty Hunter"...if you enjoy watching a collection of complete imbeciles, in leather, with a collective IQ that would register on the Kelvin scale, this is the programme to watch...or...."American Digger".....some obese, very obese and very gobby Yank pitches up at your doorstep, offers to dig hole and give the land owner a percentage of what is in the hole....:ugh:

Flap 5
6th Nov 2013, 06:30
Peter Brough and Archie Andrews. Enjoyed 'Educating Archie' on the wireless but when we got a telly, it never seemed as good.

A ventriloquist on radio didn't actually need to not move his mouth, so he did. On television that didn't really work. :hmm:

The SSK
6th Nov 2013, 08:49
I was brought up on radio 'humour' that makes me shudder now, Archie, the Clitheroe Kid, Billy Bunter, Arthur Askey. Take It From Here was OK (especially the Glums) and a bit later the Navy Lark and Beyond Our Ken raised the standard a bit.

Oh, and the Billy Cotton Band Show. Double shudder.

tony draper
6th Nov 2013, 09:57
Henry Hall? and tonight is my band night,
I used to enjoy a good Radio Drama,I remember The Kraken Wakes,Day of the Triffids,King Solomon's Mines,taught us to us our imaginations,the scenery and landscape had to be created in our minds,not presented in full colour HD and wide screen right before our eyes as now.
:)

G-CPTN
6th Nov 2013, 10:10
3zj6o_DZfSw

fenland787
6th Nov 2013, 10:21
I used to enjoy a good Radio Drama,I remember The Kraken Wakes,Day of the Triffids,King Solomon's Mines,taught us to us our imaginationsTotally agree, and wasn't there 'Destination Moon' or somesuch? Have kinda rediscovered the joy of non-tv drama with audio books lately. (nine-hour commuting flights helped)

OFSO
6th Nov 2013, 10:27
I think it was "Journey to the Moon" wasn't it ? I remember something dreadful happening to a character named "Lemmie" which terrified me.

SOPS
6th Nov 2013, 10:31
In Australia we had a great radio comedy based in a school called Yes What!

And who can forget the original Naked Vicar Show:ok::ok:

teeteringhead
6th Nov 2013, 10:32
"Journey into Space" it was - Lemmie was played by Alfie Bass, and the Captain - "Jet" Morgan - was played IIRC by David Jacobs.

And having seen Peter Brough and Archie on TV, I can understand why they were more successful on radio!

[Edited to add:] ... well I was sort of right - David Jacobs at one time - but originally Andrew Faulds (later an MP). And Lemmie was originally David Kossoff. And "Journey to the Moon" was an original title.

Wiki (http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journey_into_Space) is your friend.

aviate1138
6th Nov 2013, 10:32
Peter Brough was a lousy ventriloquist so radio was his best bet! :rolleyes:

Capot
6th Nov 2013, 10:38
The dreadful thing about Educating Archie was that the BBC World Service carried on broadcasting repeats for many years after it was, thankfully, dropped from all UK programming.

Those of us who lived overseas in the '60s and '70s, possibly even the '80s would cringe as this example of British culture was sent around the world on Short Wave (remember all that, the bands, 19m, 25m, and so on?).

The only programme that was possibly even worse was "The Clitheroe Kid".

I suspect that much of the hostility that remains towards Britain in some countries now in the Commonwealth arises not from the legacy of Colonial Rule, but from inflicting programmes like these on them.

parabellum
6th Nov 2013, 10:42
"Dick Barton, Special Agent"! Sunday afternoons, for a while, it used to be Charles Dickens, vividly remember the Scarlet Pimpernel and Tale of Two Cities, they had the sound of the blade falling down to a very believable swish and thud. Jimmy Jewel and Ben Warris were another couple but can't remember their programme's name.

radeng
6th Nov 2013, 10:42
I didn't go much for any of those shows - the one I found least bad was the Clitheroe Kid. But the 'Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy' and 'Old Harry's Game', I did enjoy.

Shack37
6th Nov 2013, 10:59
What's My Line with that grumpy old git Gilbert Harding, laff a minute.

tony draper
6th Nov 2013, 11:02
I recall a BBC radio Western series,Riders of the Range,much use of half coconut shells sand box and clinking horse tackle.
:)
I also remember every house in every drama had a gravel drive up to the front door and the scrunching sound of tyres on same as the car pulled up.
:rolleyes:

603DX
6th Nov 2013, 12:17
parabellum said:
Jimmy Jewel and Ben Warris were another couple but can't remember their programme's name.

It was called "Up the Pole", broadcast in the late 1940s. I vaguely recall it as being full of catch phrases, which were all the rage back then, the audience expected them. Jimmy Jewel played a rather daft character to Ben Warriss's straight man act, and frequently said "Eh, Harry, Eh Harry, Eh?" Which wasn't funny then, and even less now.

But one novelty was that the weekly show had a musical interlude, and one of the occasional singers was none other than Julie Andrews, years before her success as Mary Poppins in the film, and as Eliza Doolittle in the London theatre show of "My Fair Lady", with Rex Harrison.

The SSK
6th Nov 2013, 12:34
full of catch phrases, which were all the rage back then

Bruce Forsythe thinks they still are :sad:

G-CPTN
6th Nov 2013, 13:00
Jimmy Jewel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Jewel) and Ben Warris (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Warriss) were first cousins and grew up in the same household.
It is said that they were born in the same bed (though a few months apart).

It took some time for them to form a partnership (when they were 25) which lasted for 32 years before they went their separate ways after an acrimonious relationship.

M.Mouse
6th Nov 2013, 13:18
Like all things life evolves. I recall listening to 'The Navy Lark' after lunch on Sundays and programmes like 'Round the Horne'. They are very dated now but current and popular humour then.

That clip of the Black and White Minstrels brings back memories because my mother was a keen watcher. The were a good bunch of singers but doesn't it look totally inappropriate nowadays - a bunch of people made up as caricatures of black people. A mark of its popularity then was that it ran from 1958 to 1978!

ricardian
6th Nov 2013, 13:35
M.Mouse said I recall listening to 'The Navy Lark' after lunch on Sundays and programmes like 'Round the Horne'. They are very dated now but current and popular humour then.
"Round the Horne" from 1967 is being re-broadcast on Radio 4 Extra, how they ever got away with the double entendres is amazing. And there was a live band too. Radio 4 Extra is well worth keeping an eye on, re-reuns of Paul Temple etc

The SSK
6th Nov 2013, 14:04
As a sprog, was more or less obliged to sit through ‘Sing Something Simple’ on Sunday afternoons. Slightly later, having left home, found myself in a flat with three other blokes, all of whom had gone through the same thing. It became a habit for us to tune in to SSS and cheerfully sing along to the stuff we used to hate. Helped to pass the time until the pub opened.

vulcanised
6th Nov 2013, 14:27
I used to love Jack Jackson's radio show where he would play music interspersed with clips from various shows and add his own comments.

Very clever and very funny.

arcniz
6th Nov 2013, 14:29
Surely, somehow, somewhere there must be dafter. Potatoes not so big.

Quest ???????

goudie
6th Nov 2013, 14:39
..if you enjoy watching a collection of complete imbeciles, in leather, with a collective IQ that would register on the Kelvin scale, this is the programme to watch

On a par with 'Dog--Bounty Hunter' is 'Lizard Lick Towing', depicting a God awful family who repossess cars etc.

tony draper
6th Nov 2013, 15:08
Watched a episode of that lizard lick thing when it first appeared, I just couldn't believe it as real, so I googled, I was right tiz just a phoney scripted dramatization pretending to be a fly on the wall thing.
:)