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Natstrackalpha
4th Nov 2013, 19:58
:)
What do you Captains prefer to be called by your crew:

Boss?
Captain?
Sir?
Maam?

Sir George Cayley
4th Nov 2013, 21:17
Chief

Jefe (Iberia)

Skip Skipper Skippy (QANTAS)

Herr Oberst (LH)

Seat Blocker (BA)

Dad (Some nepotistic a/l)

Old Man (as in 'hows the old man?)

Your Lordship (as in my delinquent footman who refused a second flight)

SGC

G-CPTN
4th Nov 2013, 21:54
Çur :E

lomapaseo
4th Nov 2013, 23:51
whatever ...............

pigboat
5th Nov 2013, 00:16
Your Lordship (as in my delinquent footman who refused a second flight).

Now that is subtle. :D:D:D

Ozzy
5th Nov 2013, 00:50
Funny you should bring this up! My boss is at least 20 years my junior. Smart bloke, very clever, I respect him. I have loads more experience than him and share it with him. He looks good, I look good. No worries there. I call him "Boss".

Ozzy

er340790
5th Nov 2013, 03:05
Supreme Being will do..... if you want a reply, that is.

Caboclo
5th Nov 2013, 04:41
Hey you...

Tu.114
5th Nov 2013, 05:26
Oi...

Kidding aside, in my company, it is first name and the German "informal You" among all flying personnel; when referring to crew members in front of passengers, it is either "colleague" among cabin crew and "First Officer" and "Captain" for cockpit crew.

Unusual, maybe, but works just fine.

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Nov 2013, 05:52
There Goes The Barsteward Now...


Although one prefers Mein Fuhrer.

G&T ice n slice
5th Nov 2013, 08:16
weerl, speaking as an ex cargo sales/reservations/income generating ground grunt...

we refered to the captain as "that b*****d offloaded the priority pallet"

Is this written into some secret "captain's operating manual" somewhere?

Lon More
5th Nov 2013, 08:34
There's a few round here who's politics might make "Mein Fuhrer" appropriate - JOKE !!!!!

Ancient Mariner
5th Nov 2013, 08:47
In the Merchant Navy Second Engineers were called "Second", First Engineers "First" and Chief Engineers.........guess what.
Just call me Chief. ;)
Per

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Nov 2013, 08:52
There's a few round here who's politics might make "Mein Fuhrer" appropriate - JOKE !!!!!


Dang socialists...:}

Tankertrashnav
5th Nov 2013, 09:06
On tankers the captain was never called that in the air, but always "first" (as in first pilot) - eg "plotter to first, make the heading 270". Confused me when I discovered that in civvy aircraft the first officer is the one in the RHS!

Worrals in the wilds
5th Nov 2013, 09:06
How about Bungee? :E I've had a few of them.
http://dilbert.com/dyn/str_strip/000000000/00000000/0000000/000000/20000/3000/800/23854/23854.strip.gif

Hydromet
5th Nov 2013, 09:15
In the spirit of the Bungee Boss, 'Seagull' because he'd fly in, make a lot of noise, put sh!t everywhere, take what he could and fly out.

radeng
5th Nov 2013, 15:18
Hydromet,

You had seagull managers as well? Flap around, squawk, sh*t on everything and everybody before flying off....

Brian Abraham
8th Nov 2013, 00:20
God?
King?

In the early days of flying boat operations across the Atlantic by Imperial Airways the captain would be seen off by a guard of honour of the station personnel, and was referred to as "Master", as in "Master" of the vessel (aircraft) per nautical tradition.

And Masters they were. One captain turned back because milk for his tea had not been put on board. Another dined on the oysters which had been put on board for Royalty visiting Australia, and complimented the catering manager on the long over due improvement in the flying rations.

The highly experienced North Atlantic captains were known as "The Barons" in the early post war years among junior aircrew, for they were held in great respect.

Early Pan Am operations had the crew stand to attention dockside for inspection by the Captain - even the fingernails.

Natstrackalpha
8th Mar 2016, 15:26
What's a 'first'?

S/he gets to fly.;)

GrumpyOldFart
8th Mar 2016, 17:13
'Your Majesty' will suffice, thank you.

Jerholz
8th Mar 2016, 20:09
"Your airworthiness"

Loose rivets
8th Mar 2016, 23:43
Abbreviated first name, always.


I've flown with an all-girl crew. Really nice bunch. However, I don't know what I'd do if I found myself in a subservient position in this crew.:uhoh:

Air India's AI 173 - All-women operated world's longest flight is ready to take off ? IndoCanadian - Indian and Canadian News (http://www.indocanadians.ca/indo-canadian-news/indian-news/air-indias-ai-173-women-operated-worlds-longest-flight-ready-take-off/)

Pinky the pilot
9th Mar 2016, 03:54
However, I don't know what I'd do if I found myself in a subservient position in this crew.


Err,, relax, lay back and think of England perhaps?:D:E:E

Hydromet
9th Mar 2016, 06:46
Funny you should bring this up! My boss is at least 20 years my junior. Smart bloke, very clever, I respect him. I have loads more experience than him and share it with him. He looks good, I look good. No worries there. I call him "Boss".
Surely you should each call the other 'Sir', but only one of you has to mean it.:E

Null Orifice
10th Mar 2016, 14:08
A young lad on the squadron was somewhat over-awed by those of higher rank, and continually used the full rank title of 'Flight Sergeant' on every occasion he was addressed by the shift boss - "Yes, Flight sergeant" or "No, Flight Sergeant".
One day, the boss called the lad over and told him to cut out the formality, saying "We are all on first-name terms here - you can call me 'Flight'.

I was never addressed by my full rank title; for some reason, the rank of Chief Technician was always abbreviated by all, from the Staish, down to the most junior, as simply, "Chief".

FLCH
10th Mar 2016, 17:37
I've heard "Your left most forward shipness" being bandied around.

tony draper
10th Mar 2016, 17:51
In my day he Captain was Captain the Mates Mr,ie Mr Jones,the gingerbeers Chief Second Third and so on, the Cook was Doc the Radio Officer Sparky,the Bosun was bosun or Bos.:)

Rosevidney1
10th Mar 2016, 18:16
I think I would rather fancy the term Most Majestic Majesty said Larry the Lamb.

Stanwell
10th Mar 2016, 19:30
These days, it seems that some of the more traditional forms of address have been supplanted by the cringeworthy "Team Leader". :yuk:

Heatseeker
27th Mar 2016, 07:21
I don't want to play down the Air India achievement at all however I remember many years ago reading the BA staff newspaper (AKA the Friday fire starter) which showed an entire flight team, techies, trolly dollies and groundies (one of whom was very very pregnant) who were all women.

Superb achievement AI but it's already been done. Mind you, if my memory serves me right, their aircraft was an ATP.

GO GIRLS :D:D:D

H

Ripline
27th Mar 2016, 10:01
"Your Pilotness" is what one of my loyal Clacton-based balloon crew call me. I can totally live with that. For some reason Mrs. Ripline smirks when this happens.....

Ripline

Shaggy Sheep Driver
27th Mar 2016, 10:20
I thought balloon drivers were 'Balloonatics'?

Wetstart Dryrun
27th Mar 2016, 10:30
they should never have built a two-seat aeroplane.

Tankertrashnav
27th Mar 2016, 10:36
The army started it. They already had a seat for the officer, but they found they needed one for the driver as well ;)

Shaggy Sheep Driver
27th Mar 2016, 10:41
Then the RAF realised the driver would need something to eat if they came down in remote country, so they put a nav in the back.

lomapaseo
27th Mar 2016, 11:44
holy Sheet

ExSp33db1rd
27th Mar 2016, 22:23
I used to say to crew I'd not previously met, that my name's xx ( christian name) but if they felt uncomfortable with that during our time in uniform,then I was "Captain", but I didn't have a knightood. ( so forget the Sir ! ) No titles in the post flight bar of course.

Once, as a Snr. First Office, I was sat in the jump seat whilst the more junior first officer operated as co-pilot. A well known Cockney steward of small stature - my ex-colleagues will know of whom I speak ! - came on to the flight deck and addressed the guy as Mr. Second Officer. He turned around furiously, and pointed to the 2 stripes on his shirt, saying "I'm a FIRST officer " The steward just turned to me and said "there's only one number one on the flight deck, ain't that right number one ?" and walked off.

When I was flying my final trip under supervision, hoping to be promoted, the same steward was one of the cabin crew. Having completed all the pre-take off checks I applied the brakes and asked for him to attend the flight deck, the training Capt. gave me a quizzical look, but didn't comment. When the steward arrived I told him to sit in the empty navigators seat and keep quiet, he asked why, cos I want to know what the f**k you're up to I said, he roared with laughter but enjoyed the take-off.

At the end of that flight, successfully promoted, I found my jacket sleeves stitched up at the cuffs, and cotton wool from a destroyed ( clean ! ) Tampax stapled around the brim of my hat in the manner of the subsequent gold braid !

Happy Days.

Ripline
1st Apr 2016, 10:06
SSS,

I thought balloon drivers were 'Balloonatics'? Only by non-balloonists! And only in Germany are we called "drivers". We hide our skills well, most of the time. Ask the South African Ambassador to Thailand what she thought of mine earlier this month.....

Ripline