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probes
4th Nov 2013, 17:05
following a link form another thread - I wonder. Is it really that bad? After all, languages change all the time. We'd probably be quite illiterate in the Shakespearean English, wouldn't we?

Literacy rates affecting workers' competence, AI Group finds, with early childhood reading key - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-11-04/literacy-rates-workers-competence-employers/5068544)

In survey of more than 500 employers by the Australian Industry Group, 93 per cent of respondents said their employees' poor literacy was affecting their business and also putting workers at risk.
The AI Group says language, literacy and numeracy skills among some employees are so bad that pictures and symbols are increasingly being used to warn them about workplace hazards.

P.S shouldn't it be "in a survey"? :p

G-CPTN
4th Nov 2013, 17:07
literacy and numeracy skills among some employees are so bad
Yet they employ them . . . :confused:

Airborne Aircrew
4th Nov 2013, 17:37
G-CPTN:

Yet they employ them . . .Indeed.

When I am employing, (IT administrators, programmers and the like), resumes go into three distinct piles. Pile one is "Review again for potential interview", "Rejected due to inadequate/inappropriate qualifications or experience", "Rejected due to insufficient attention to detail".

The latter category is usually the pile for the "illiterates". IT work requires a certain amount of attention to detail and the software this pile's recipients use has both a spell checker and a grammar checker. If they can't be bothered to avail themselves of them when they are trying to extract not insignificant amounts of money from me in exchange for their "skills" then I have little faith that they will expend any more effort while trying not to destroy my systems.

Believe this or not I actually encountered a young man with rather impressive qualifications and and good work experience. He clearly had no need of spell/grammar checkers or had used them to his benefit. Whichever it was doesn't matter his resume and cover letter were letter perfect, except for one tiny little detail. He'd misspelled his last name... Really, his bloody name. I'm sure you're thinking "How would you know"? It's rather simple, his resume had it spelled one way in the block at the top and the signature block of his cover letter had it spelled differently... He was rejected outright... :ugh:

Loose rivets
4th Nov 2013, 19:57
Oh, Airborne, how could you??!!

I've told the tale of my dyslexia many times, and indeed the story of being in Shell Mex House, the Ministry of Planes, and having to fill in a form. They'd got my darn ALTP (or later ATPL), so I couldn't sneak a look at how to spell my first name. William. Not difficult, but for most of my life I could not detect text in the same way as other mortals. At the age of 58-ish, I stopped eating cheese. The jazzing problem went away and I started to learn to spell.

I did at least as well as other exam candidates, sitting in 'Avigation' with no lesser pilots than Gordon Corps and a Cambridge physics graduate, who seemed to be neck and neck with me on the workload. I memorized the sound of the spelling of the tricky words, and that was it. No image of the word in my mind's eye. Nothing. Just blackness.

Anyway, the point of all this is, some people have a significant parameter missing. But heck, I was the only one of a group of engineers and pilots walking past a British Eagle new engine in a crate, that had the most extraordinary damage to tiny widgets under the lacquer. (I've just gone back and removed one of the m's from dammage. ) I'm better, but not cured.

I could just feel machinery, and I suggest some of your candidates can sense if a million lines of code don't feel right. Silly comparison, but you know what I mean.

Right, this thread is getting serious. I'm off.:p

Loose rivets
4th Nov 2013, 20:36
Oh, and look who wrote this.


Re: Gordon Corps (http://www.kls2.com/cgi-bin/arcfetch?db=sci.aeronautics.airliners&id=%[email protected]%3E)

Gertrude the Wombat
4th Nov 2013, 21:15
The latter category is usually the pile for the "illiterates". IT work requires a certain amount of attention to detail and the software this pile's recipients use has both a spell checker and a grammar checker. If they can't be bothered to avail themselves of them when they are trying to extract not insignificant amounts of money from me in exchange for their "skills" then I have little faith that they will expend any more effort while trying not to destroy my systems.
Yup. CVs for software people with spelling errors go straight in the bin.

It's maybe a bit of a pity when the CV was rewritten by an agency who might well have added an error that wasn't in the original, but then the candidate is getting failed for his incompetent choice of agency.

Airborne Aircrew
4th Nov 2013, 21:35
Gertie:

We agree down to one, very small point. The choice of agency isn't the relevant factor. The fact that they didn't make it a part of the deal that the agency sends all work sent out by them back to the candidate for their approval. Failure to do so that results in failure to get an interview will result in legal action....

I'd hire that person in a heartbeat...

Lord Spandex Masher
4th Nov 2013, 22:27
G-CPTN:

Indeed.

When I am employing, (IT administrators, programmers and the like), resumes go into three distinct piles. Pile one is "Review again for potential interview", "Rejected due to inadequate/inappropriate qualifications or experience", "Rejected due to insufficient attention to detail".

The latter category is usually the pile for the "illiterates". IT work requires a certain amount of attention to detail and the software this pile's recipients use has both a spell checker and a grammar checker. If they can't be bothered to avail themselves of them when they are trying to extract not insignificant amounts of money from me in exchange for their "skills" then I have little faith that they will expend any more effort while trying not to destroy my systems.

Believe this or not I actually encountered a young man with rather impressive qualifications and and good work experience. He clearly had no need of spell/grammar checkers or had used them to his benefit. Whichever it was doesn't matter his resume and cover letter were letter perfect, except for one tiny little detail. He'd misspelled his last name... Really, his bloody name. I'm sure you're thinking "How would you know"? It's rather simple, his resume had it spelled one way in the block at the top and the signature block of his cover letter had it spelled differently... He was rejected outright... :ugh:

*Sigh*......

Natstrackalpha
4th Nov 2013, 23:20
Originally Posted by Airborne Aircrewhttp://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/527039-literacy.html#post8134991)
G-CPTN:

Indeed.

When I am employing, (IT administrators, programmers and the like), resumes go into three distinct piles. Pile one is "Review again for potential interview", "Rejected due to inadequate/inappropriate qualifications or experience", "Rejected due to insufficient attention to detail".

The latter category is usually the pile for the "illiterates". IT work requires a certain amount of attention to detail and the software this pile's recipients use has both a spell checker and a grammar checker. If they can't be bothered to avail themselves of them when they are trying to extract not insignificant amounts of money from me in exchange for their "skills" then I have little faith that they will expend any more effort while trying not to destroy my systems.

Believe this or not I actually encountered a young man with rather impressive qualifications and and good work experience. He clearly had no need of spell/grammar checkers or had used them to his benefit. Whichever it was doesn't matter his resume and cover letter were letter perfect, except for one tiny little detail. He'd misspelled his last name... Really, his bloody name. I'm sure you're thinking "How would you know"? It's rather simple, his resume had it spelled one way in the block at the top and the signature block of his cover letter had it spelled differently... He was rejected outright... :ugh:


Maybe it was just a typo?

Or maybe just a freudian slip, they are quite common you know - why only the other day, I meant to say to the wife at the breakfast table
"could you please pass the marmalade darling" . . .

but instead it came out as

"you`ve ruined my life you big fat cow!"

Airborne Aircrew
5th Nov 2013, 00:36
Natstrackalpha:

"you`ve ruined my life you big fat cow!"

Done the same myself... :ok:

Lord Spandex Masher
5th Nov 2013, 09:18
Maybe it was just a typo?

Well of course it was. But had he paid more attention to detail it might have been spotted and he wouldn't have ended up on his own "pile for the illiterates".

One shouldn't lecture on attention to detail if one doesn't pay attention to detail.

Pride goes before a fall an' all that.