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goudie
4th Nov 2013, 10:09
Two policemen give young boy 'a dressing down' after he accidentally flicked a rubber band into the face of another boy.
The mother of the boy who was hit by the rubber band, said he was traumatised by the incident, which is why she reported it to the police.


Leicestershire Police criticised after disciplining schoolboy who flicked elastic band at another boy - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/10424529/Leicestershire-Police-criticised-after-disciplining-schoolboy-who-flicked-elastic-band-at-another-boy.html)

Deepest Norfolk
4th Nov 2013, 10:28
I think the kid and his Mum have more problems than they know if the little darling was "traumatized" by having an elastic band accidentally flicked in his face!!

Life is going to be a real bitch for this over sensitive child.

DN

Sallyann1234
4th Nov 2013, 10:34
Was it really 'accidental'? If the kid was flicking rubber bands about he was aiming them somewhere!
If the mother complained to police and they ignored her, there would probably be another complaint.

skydiver69
4th Nov 2013, 10:42
The trouble is that we in the police now have very little discretion in some of the things that we are expected to deal with. If someone reports that they have been assaulted we are expected to take action because as soon as the circumstances are written down either a compliance bean counter or an office based inspector will want to know what we did or did not do to address the allegation. This is partly arse covering by some officers and partly standard raising by the HMIC.

Given that sort of background I can see why this incident led to police talking to the boy. Mother of boy A doesn't think the school did enough therefore calls police to say that her son has been assaulted. A bobby is then allocated the incident followed by much eye rolling by him and his sergeant but as the allegation is now written down it can't be erased so it has to be addressed. The bobby therefore uses an opportunity between lots of other jobs to knock on boy B's door on a saturday night to talk to him. The bobby can then inform boy A's parents that they have spoken to boy B and the incident can be closed. No further action will be taken but both boy B and his mother are left upset.

Lightning Mate
4th Nov 2013, 10:45
When I was at school a long time ago, we were always getting into scrapes various, even sometimes getting minor injuries.

Back then the police used their time to catch criminals.

Sop_Monkey
4th Nov 2013, 10:51
I can sympathize with the cop on this one. Rock and a hard place. Too much red tape. We are all tying ourselves up with it.

I believe when the police force was formed the idea was to stop crime happening.

Shack37
4th Nov 2013, 10:54
I agree, damned if they did and damned if they didn't.


Little blighter's just lucky it wasn't a brass band:rolleyes:

AtomKraft
4th Nov 2013, 11:08
Could have had somebodies eye oot!

:rolleyes:

BOAC
4th Nov 2013, 11:14
Wasn't the Chief Constable of Leicestershire Police allegedly/possibly/reportedly etc etc one of the CCs accused of fudging the enquiry/attempting to hide/'covering up'/ etc etc the Mitchellgate fiasco? Looks like they have their priorities right up there.:ugh:

Tone
4th Nov 2013, 11:32
I must have fired laggy bands at dozens of kids in my youth, until now I hadn't realised how traumatising it could be. Perhaps I am responsible for ruining the lives of all those people, no doubt they all turned into murderers, rapists, buggerers and parking restriction violators. How can I live with myself? Can I get counselling on the National Elf?

skydiver69
4th Nov 2013, 11:42
Wasn't the Chief Constable of Leicestershire Police allegedly/possibly/reportedly etc etc one of the CCs accused of fudging the enquiry/attempting to hide/'covering up'/ etc etc the Mitchellgate fiasco? Looks like they have their priorities right up there.

No. Nothing to do with Simon Cole or any of his officers.

Cacophonix
4th Nov 2013, 11:46
I wonder what the police would have made of me jabbing my choir mate friend in the left buttock (said like Forest G) with the sharp end of a geometer's compass during his solo rendition of Panis Angelicus at the tender age of 10 in the school chapel?

Pea shooters, throwing darts at each other, the occasional cut lip after a fist fight. All morally improving stuff...

Caco

er340790
4th Nov 2013, 11:50
There's nowt wrong with lacky-bands... the bigger the better.

Only this weekend, I finished my 150' Super-Band. Spanning two telegraph poles, angled at 99.4 deg true, I can now fire 100-lb rocks at Quebec...

You watch, someone will probably complain about that too. :sad: :ugh: :sad:

rgbrock1
4th Nov 2013, 11:52
Tone wrote:

I must have fired laggy bands at dozens of kids in my youth, until now I hadn't realised how traumatising it could be.

Hang your head in shame you... you... you bully you.

rgbrock1
4th Nov 2013, 11:55
Caco wrote:

I wonder what the police would have made of me jabbing my choir mate friend in the left buttock (said like Forest G) with the sharp end of a geometer's compass during his solo rendition of Panis Angelicus at the tender age of 10 in the school chapel?

Pea shooters, throwing darts at each other, the occasional cut lip after a fist fight. All morally improving stuff...

Caco

Life in prison for you Caco. How dare you. Come to think about it, perhaps life in prison isn't severe enough. Time to strap you into old Sparky. :}

G-CPTN
4th Nov 2013, 12:01
Warning - the conclusion of this video content is disturbing:- https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=349026651898975

Cacophonix
4th Nov 2013, 12:07
Time to strap you into old Sparky. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/badteeth.gif


I was caned severely for the compass crime RGB! :\

So saying, today, I could have the teacher arrested for assault for the punishment meted out to me.

Something going very wrong out there with respect to our views on crime and punishment methinks, particularly in schools when the police are able to get involved at every level of minor misdemeanour and seem to find it appropriate to do so.

Thrash and thrash em again I say and thrash the little twerp who went blubbing to mommy as well.

Caco

Andy_S
4th Nov 2013, 12:14
I can sympathize with the cop on this one.

Just one problem there.

It was actually cops. Plural. Two of them.

That's right. It actually took two cops to deal with a small boy.

I can only assume that crime is virtually non-existent in Leicestershire if the cops have this much time on their hands.......

G-CPTN
4th Nov 2013, 12:20
It actually took two cops to deal with a small boy.That is so that they can corroborate each other's account of their actions.

Or maybe the second officer was taken along to observe how such interviews were conducted?

UniFoxOs
4th Nov 2013, 12:22
Mother of boy A doesn't think the school did enough therefore calls police to say that her son has been assaulted.

So she gets some evidence registered for the compo claim?


Life is going to be a real bitch for this over sensitive child.


but not as bad as for a mate's grandson. His OCD mother won't let grandad into the house if he is wearing clothes that he has smoked a cigarette in.


UFO

goudie
4th Nov 2013, 12:34
In my, all boy's school, anyone caught fighting, bullying etc. was offered a choice of a caning by the Head or to go three rounds in the boxing ring, with the PT master, after school finished.

As has been mentioned, I fear for the boy who has an over protective mother, she hasn't done him any favours.
Whilst I understand the police are over a barrel and have to act upon the complaint, a token visit by one policeman or policewoman, and a mild admonishing chat, would have sufficed, not a bollocking by two of them, on the doorstep.

pigboat
4th Nov 2013, 12:39
You watch, someone will probably complain about that too.

Quit firing rocks at me. I'll sic Pauline on ya. :D

skydiver69
4th Nov 2013, 12:48
Just one problem there.

It was actually cops. Plural. Two of them.

That's right. It actually took two cops to deal with a small boy.

I can only assume that crime is virtually non-existent in Leicestershire if the cops have this much time on their hands.......

I doubt if it did take two Pcs to deal with this incident although two clearly went to the address. Two likely explanations are either that they happened to be double crewed which on a saturday evening/night is a sensible option, so they both went to talk to the boy and his mother, or alternatively it might have been a tutor constable and his student who attended. Either way don't read too much into the number.

Lightning Mate
4th Nov 2013, 13:14
cotton wool I tell you, cotton wool.

Doors to Automatic
4th Nov 2013, 13:19
If the Police had not dealt with it there would be complaints too. Personally I am more than happy when the Police deal with ASB robustly, however small the complaint. This particular force has been criticised in past years for not being quick enough to respond so it is good to see a chance in attitude.

Today's unchecked elastic band flick might become tomorrows brick through a window. Schools do nothing these days so I am not surprised if disgruntled parents go to the Police. No further action taken - case closed. Well done Leicester Police for once.

Capetonian
4th Nov 2013, 13:25
The real worry is that whilst a kid gets a reprimand and is upset, real criminals and terrorists go through the courts and appeal processes at vast expense to the taxpayer and walk free.

Lightning Mate
4th Nov 2013, 13:26
Exactly...........

Lightning Mate
4th Nov 2013, 13:35
Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the psyche that occurs as a result
of a severely distressing event.

...as in being hit by an elastic band. :ugh::ugh:

rgbrock1
4th Nov 2013, 13:49
Lightning Mate wrote:

...as in being hit by an elastic band.

Or by being pinched on the buttocks. Very traumatic. Leads to scarring for life.

SilsoeSid
4th Nov 2013, 14:05
Capetonian;
The real worry is that whilst a kid gets a reprimand and is upset, real criminals and terrorists go through the courts and appeal processes at vast expense to the taxpayer and walk free.

Lightning Mate;
Exactly..........


Which of course has absolutely nothing to do with the police :ugh:

Andy_S
4th Nov 2013, 15:04
Personally I am more than happy when the Police deal with ASB robustly, however small the complaint.

Please tell me you’re not serious……

This is an incident that could, and should have been dealt with by the teaching staff.

Good God. What state have we got ourselves into if the police are required to visit the home of every kid who has done something slightly unpleasant – however small - to another kid.

rgbrock1
4th Nov 2013, 15:09
Andy_S questioned:

Good God. What state have we got ourselves into

SPP? (The State of Perpetual Pussies)

angels
4th Nov 2013, 15:47
Not the cops' fault at all.

UniFoxOs
4th Nov 2013, 16:37
Today's unchecked elastic band flick might become tomorrows brick through a window

At which time they will presumably do nothing, as in the following case.



Police errors contributed to suicide of tormented mother Fiona .. (http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2009/sep/28/fiona-pilkington-suicide-mother-police)

SilsoeSid
4th Nov 2013, 17:38
At which time they will presumably do nothing, as in the following case.

Oh yes, all the police's fault, no wait, hold on ....


"Police errors and inaction were partly responsible for driving a vulnerable single mother to kill herself and her severely disabled daughter after years of abuse from youths, an inquest found today."


"The verdict also held the local council partly accountable for failing for years to take action against the young gangs, and criticised the county social services department for not referring Pilkington for professional help after she said she felt suicidal.

Pilkington discussed matters with two antisocial behaviour officers from her borough council, dealt with a series of social workers and even wrote to her MP.

Hinckley and Bosworth council's community officers visited Pilkington but never learned until after she was dead that anyone in the family was disabled."



Still, as the anti police bandwagon is passing unifoxos, best you jump it.

Hydromet
4th Nov 2013, 20:59
Oh, such police brutality (http://au.news.yahoo.com/vic/a/19666166/police-outraged-over-horse-dribble-lawsuit/) must not go unpunished!

Capetonian
5th Nov 2013, 06:58
Capetonian;
Quote:
The real worry is that whilst a kid gets a reprimand and is upset, real criminals and terrorists go through the courts and appeal processes at vast expense to the taxpayer and walk free.
Which of course has absolutely nothing to do with the police
True, but the judicial system and the police are not exactly independent of each other, but my comment was aimed at the judiciary rather than, in this case, the police.

MagnusP
5th Nov 2013, 09:30
We would never have dreamed of flicking laccy bands at other kids. Waste of laccy bands.

We'd string them together to make a catapult you could suspend between thumb and forefinger and fire pellets made from little bits of cardboard rolled up then folded into a 'V' shape. They stung!

Andy_S
5th Nov 2013, 09:39
We'd string them together to make a catapult you could suspend between thumb and forefinger and fire pellets made from little bits of cardboard rolled up then folded into a 'V' shape. They stung!

If you did that today, they'd probably send an armed response unit round to your home.....

MagnusP
5th Nov 2013, 10:49
@ Andy_S, :ok:

Used to use whatever laccy bands we could find or scrounge until Woolies started selling packets of little coloured bands. It gave an air of artistic creativity to our welt-raising, leg-stinging fun (we urchins all wore short trousers then). Discarded fag packets provided much of our ammunition.

Peashooter season was fun, too. We'd use discarded ballpoint pens as the shooter, and go and make a noise in our tenement stairwell until Mrs Robertson on the top floor tipped a cup of dried barley on us to chase us away. Dried barley is the perfect ammo for a ballpoint peashooter! :p

ZH875
5th Nov 2013, 10:56
This is what happens when you put an ex RAF senior officer in charge of a civilian police force. Perhaps we should only employ ex chief constables in PCC roles.


Standing by for RAF officers to defend Sir Clive Loader......

Dushan
5th Nov 2013, 11:59
Pea shooters, throwing darts at each other, the occasional cut lip after a fist fight. All leading to countless YouTube clips...

Caco

Fixed it for you Caco:}

SASless
9th Nov 2013, 11:32
We have the same kind of problems here....bad Cops over reacting.

One such example......

Police Officer's Final Act of Kindness Caught on Tape Before Dying - Inspirational Video (http://www.godvine.com/Police-Officer-s-Final-Act-of-Kindness-Caught-on-Tape-Before-Dying-1065.html)

RAC/OPS
10th Nov 2013, 07:56
Together they began stealing sweets and toys from shops, threw stones at old ladies' windows, swore at shopkeepers to goad them into giving chase, and jumped in and out of gardens to enrage householders.

Others told how they stoned birds and tortured cats.

Any ideas who this article is talking about? How many of the above acts singly would attract the attention of the police?.........



Soon, they would also become the youngest children in the 20th century to be successfully tried for murder

Tarq57
10th Nov 2013, 08:06
He was watching X-factor with his mum when the police arrived.
That alone is good reason for a dressing down.

Justice has been served.