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crewmeal
29th Oct 2013, 06:52
Seems jealousy in the Magic Kingdom is rife as ever.

Horrific video shows Saudi husband beating Asian man with a belt 'because he spoke to his wife' | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2478461/Horrific-video-shows-Saudi-husband-beating-Asian-man-belt-spoke-wife.html)

Is there no social etiquette left in Saudi?

500N
29th Oct 2013, 06:57
Are they that insecure ?

GrumpyOldFart
29th Oct 2013, 12:19
Fücking savages.

arcniz
29th Oct 2013, 12:35
Is there no social etiquette left in Saudi?

IIRC, from the early Aramco era, that WAS the preferred social etiquette.

Thomas coupling
29th Oct 2013, 13:54
What's the difference between this and here in this country where a drunk thug in a pub thinks another guy has just been looking at his wife?

G-CPTN
29th Oct 2013, 14:07
A drunk thug in a pub thinks another guy has just been looking at his wife?
This has always puzzled me. If the female is attractive-looking then this is almost normal behaviour, Shirley?

A friend used to respond "What, me, looking at your bird? You must be joking!" which I thought was risky . . .

cavortingcheetah
29th Oct 2013, 14:07
One difference is that the Saudi thug is unlikely to be drunk.

Lightning Mate
29th Oct 2013, 14:10
When I first met someone who was to become my first wife, whenever I took her anywhere all the heterosexuals just kept looking at her.

Didn't offend me in the slightest. My attitude was "and I'm sleeping with her tonight a:mad:es.

She was a model for Vogue magazine.

Thomas coupling
29th Oct 2013, 14:13
Lightning mate: You mean Vague magazine?
They were looking at her because they couldn't believe she'd stoop to being with someone like you;)

Only guessing of course......

500N
29th Oct 2013, 14:14
It also looks like it is in the house of the Saudi.

500N
29th Oct 2013, 14:15
"was to become my first wife"

Who made the mistake ?

You or her ?

Lightning Mate
29th Oct 2013, 14:17
ME !........

BenThere
29th Oct 2013, 14:46
Isn't male sexual insecurity one of the pillars of .....

I hang out a lot in Ann Arbor, Michigan, which is home to a large university and a hotbed of liberal-to-radical feminism, and a plethora of cherished left-wing causes. Disinvesting in any Israel-connected investment is one of those causes.

Often I see young student females, often lily-white and obviously not deprived in any way, affecting the garb of the Islamic female dress code. My unexpressed thoughts are always, "What in the hell are you thinking?"

Lonewolf_50
29th Oct 2013, 14:59
Often I see young student females, often lily-white and obviously not deprived in any way, affecting the garb of the Islamic female dress code. My unexpressed thoughts are always, "What in the hell are you thinking?"
Provisional answer #1:

Thinking that getting astride the dick of some Arab son of an oil tycoon secures their financial future.

Provisional answer #2:

Not actually thinking.

Evanelpus
29th Oct 2013, 16:22
One difference is that the Saudi thug is unlikely to be drunk.

I hope this is a tongue in cheek comment? The few Saudis I've known and dealt with over the years drank like fish.

BenThere
29th Oct 2013, 16:40
I observed a long time ago shopping in the fantastic supermarkets of Jeddah the whole aisles devoted to grape juice, yeast and sugar.

I've also observed the Saudis and such when they hit Vegas. I don't pass judgment on that. I'd misbehave, too, if I had such a suffocating culture to escape from.

tony draper
29th Oct 2013, 16:46
How could a bloke wearing a feckin long nighty beat a bloke wearing kecks?:uhoh:

cavortingcheetah
29th Oct 2013, 16:51
Testicular constriction reduces the ability of the male to produce testosterone, a vital ingredient in the formation of aggressive synapses. Flowing robes mean cooler balls and thus more of them, in a figurative fashion.

BenThere
29th Oct 2013, 17:09
The non-Saudi in this fight could not fight back for fear of losing his livelihood. Also, if you're an ex-pat in Saudi Arabia and run afoul of a Saudi and it goes to court, the Saudi always wins. You sign on to that when you agree to a gig there.

Thomas coupling
29th Oct 2013, 19:49
The KSA lives in fear of its Kingdom. It knows the wolves continue to circle their sovereignty and will wait for as long as it takes. An evil, cruel family who have held control for eons.
And the reason they still hold power: the good old US of A followed a very very close second by the good old UK.
What would the KSA do without us.......disintegrate hopefully.

This place is waaaaaaaaaaaaaay past its shelf life and come the day when one of those wolves creeps in through a door left ajar...the whole royal family will be savaged....hopefully.

BenThere
29th Oct 2013, 19:53
And the reason they still hold power: the good old US of A

Wrong! The USA does nothing to hold the Saudi regime in power. If you think otherwise, post some evidence.

Cacophonix
29th Oct 2013, 21:26
"Don't chat up my wife or else..."

Translated into the parlance of Johannesburg....

"Don't check my chick china..."

Caco

Cacophonix
29th Oct 2013, 21:55
The USA does nothing to hold the Saudi regime in power.

All hail Ben There, the master of double think.... :p

The Israelis and the Saudis might have got their collective knickers in a knot about the US 'failure' to intervene in Syria and the despicable Saudis have seen fit to take their camels and rag heads out into the desert to sulk but in truth both countries are hugely supported by the US (mutual enemies as they are, Saudi Arabia and Israel I mean)...

The Scandal of U.S.-Saudi Relations :: Daniel Pipes (http://www.danielpipes.org/995/the-scandal-of-us-saudi-relations)

Caco

BenThere
29th Oct 2013, 22:02
So you post a link I never thought you would, Caco, to Daniel Pipes.

It doesn't change the fact that the US hasn't needed to, and does not help the Saudi regime to stay in power.

Cacophonix
29th Oct 2013, 22:08
US hasn't needed to, and does not help the Saudi regime to stay in power

You hear about a little place called Iran Ben? The US needs the Saudi enmity towards those damned Persians just as much as Jerusalem. Don't kid yourself! America supports Saudi as much as it can and one of Iran's greatest enemies called Israel does tacitly as well.

As for my historical and political opinions you might be somewhat surprised if we ever got to discuss them... ;)

Edited to say - that what I mean is that although Pipes may be profoundly wrong in some things doesn't mean to say that he is not profoundly right in others...

Caco

Thomas coupling
29th Oct 2013, 22:43
Ben: What rock do you live under? Come out and see the light brother:

Saudi Arabia is seen as a pivotal anchor to US interests in the Middle East, and for decades the two have nurtured ties primarily based on mutual oil and security interests.

Historians refer to a meeting between King Abdel Aziz and President Franklin D Roosevelt in 1945 as securing what is called "the special relationship". That relationship continued throughout the Cold War with Saudi Arabia backing the US fight against communism.

Saudi Arabia's 1973 oil embargo on the US put a strain on the relationship. But the kingdom later stepped in to fill the global oil shortage when war broke out between its neighbours Iraq and Iran - a policy that was co-ordinated with the US.

More recently, the 9/11 attack, and the fact that many of the attackers were of Saudi origin, seriously damaged the kingdom's image in the US. However, shared concerns about armed groups like al-Qaeda, and Iran's regional ambitions, have provided what has been called a "renewed logic" for their strategic partnership.

The kingdom holds hundreds of billions of dollars in US treasury bonds; American oil and construction contractors have a massive presence in the kingdom; and Saudi also buys the bulk of its military equipment from the United States. The latest deal, posted on the Pentagon's website just a few weeks ago, is worth $7bn.

Saudi is pivotal to being a buffer between Iran and the US.
However, I must stress that this relationship has recently gone very very cool due to Syria and the US's intransigence of late.

Both the US and the UK have made billions out of the KSA. Intel is also shared about all their neighbouring "allies". The irony of all this is that after everything the US has done for Saudi, it still is assumed to be the catalyst for 9/11. And yet the US has done nothing about it.....now why is that?

Ben - c'mon.....do you still really believe in your own hype?

Cacophonix
29th Oct 2013, 22:51
You speak fair Mr Coupling...

Ben There is more ostrich than American Eagle methinks...:ok:

Caco

BenThere
29th Oct 2013, 23:20
Okay, you've gone wild and I should update where I am today so you can respond.

Saudi is upset over US attempts to reach agreement with Iran.
Israel is at boiling point thinking Iran is two weeks to nukes.

The US administration is feckless.

What're ya gonna do?

Cacophonix
29th Oct 2013, 23:24
What're ya gonna do?

Develop a growing disrespect for the US hypocrisy and feel a little sorry for you... ;)

Simple!

Caco

Edited to say that America should call liberty like it is and learn to criticise Iran, Israel and Saudi Arabia... (they really aren't the world's best arbiters of civilization)...

hoofie
30th Oct 2013, 08:19
BenThere wrote:
I observed a long time ago shopping in the fantastic supermarkets of Jeddah the whole aisles devoted to grape juice, yeast and sugar.

Yup, I had my couple of plastic bins of non-alcoholic beer [not for long] fermenting away nicely.

A very good friend of mine specialised in buying expired non-alcoholic beer and then er..."processing it" via sugar/yeast into something else.

He finally toned it down when the beer was being delivered via truck and by the pallet load to his house......

The beer was categorised as am/pm i.e. was it brewed this morning or this afternoon.

Thomas coupling
30th Oct 2013, 10:54
Ben There: I'm sorry to have to re-iterate what is being whispered around the bazaars: The American Empire is cracking :

Debt Ceiling - completely out of control.
Owing a third of its debt to China.
Watching China take over as the world's economic powerhouse come 2030.
Spying on everyone and everything.
Pandering to the Israeli's.
Propping up the Saudi Regime.
Now being suckered into the Iran debacle.
Losing the war in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Buggering up the Libya situation.
Gun crime completely out of control.
Obese capital of the world.
Apart from that, it's business as usual in good ole US of A.


From a Middle East perspective, the best thing the most powerful human being on the planet can do is spend all those gazillions of dollars on a peace arrnagement between Israel and the rest of the neighbouring countries. Give Palestine a home and FORCE the Israeli's to change with the times.
Oh - and nuke Iran:=

parabellum
30th Oct 2013, 12:32
This place is waaaaaaaaaaaaaay past its shelf life and come the day when one of those wolves creeps in through a door left ajar...the whole royal family will be savaged....hopefully.

Judging by the state large parts of the Middle East have got themselves into over the past few years the last thing the world needs is for Saudi to follow them. Iran is the primary agent provocateur in that area, Bahrain particularly, a militant Muslim Saudi would see the beginning of the end of the Gulf states too, not hard to imagine what would happen to the only working democracy in the Middle East shortly after that. For all it's faults Saudi is best left the way it is.

Lonewolf_50
30th Oct 2013, 14:15
From a Middle East perspective, the best thing the most powerful human being on the planet can do is spend all those gazillions of dollars on a peace arrnagement between Israel and the rest of the neighbouring countries. Give Palestine a home and FORCE the Israeli's to change with the times.
Oh - and nuke Iran:=From an American perspective, spending a cent on the peace process between Palestinians and Israelis is a case of every penny wasted. **** 'em, and a pox upon both of their houses.

We have more important things to spend our dollars on, in gazillions or other units, given the points you make on our financial condition. Spending it on useless cnuts who hate each other isn't one of them.

Thomas coupling
30th Oct 2013, 14:55
Lonewolf: you are already spending gazillions on military hardware for them anyway. How much is it costing the American Public to prop up Israel????

Mark my words this "disentanglement" from KSA that Obama is going thru is done for a purpose. Next year, I believe the US is going to seriously address its military budget and make some very very painful decisions.
One of them will be to disengage from the middle east to a lower level than they have been doing in the past.
America has some hard decisions to make on the home front and overseas - there are going to be some very grumpy 'customers' left in the lurch as the yanks pull the financial lifelines many have come to survive off.:{

airship
30th Oct 2013, 15:33
G-CPTN wrote: This has always puzzled me. If the female is attractive-looking then this is almost normal behaviour, Shirley?

A friend used to respond "What, me, looking at your bird? You must be joking!" which I thought was risky . . .

Without any undue disrespect to our fellow human-beings (the Neanderthals) who alas all disappeared several 10s of thousands of years ago, I'd just like to say that these "Neanderthals" that G-CPTN alludes to are "well alive and kicking" almost everywhere in 2013. Don't anyone dare to admire / stare at "his" bird/s in your local pub...?! Having said that, the "birds" involved wouldn't give a shite normally, if not pros, merely interested in the car you drive etc. :rolleyes:

rgbrock1
30th Oct 2013, 17:52
Losing the war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Define "losing". Because we left or are in the process of leaving? I'm curious as to how you came to define the wars in both places as having been "lost".

BenThere
30th Oct 2013, 18:40
As the US achieves energy independence, and China, Japan, India and Europe are much more dependent on Persian Gulf oil, it makes sense that the US disengage and remove its costly, mostly naval presence there as sequester cuts demand a sharper military pencil.

Preservation of the world order by the US is fast going out the window.

rgbrock1
30th Oct 2013, 18:45
BenThere:

Interesting in your bringing out the point about American energy independence. I was recently reading an article which described how the U.S. is currently on track to become an oil exporter in the next decade or so and will soon pass both Saudi Arabia and Russia in oil production. (All brought to you by "fracking", which I have no opinion on either way.)

Thomas coupling
30th Oct 2013, 19:02
RGBrock1: If you think leaving Iraq in the state it's in now as "winning" with 106,000 dead AFTER you left. With the government under attack from all sides. With a police force which is deserting at the rate of hundreds a day across the nation. With an Army, 70% of which are bombed out of their tiny minds for 90% of the day, screwing little boys in between shifts.

With the Afghan leader telling the world that he is going to jump into bed with the Taliban ASAP. With their police and army decimated and incapable of defending their oath never mind their civilian population. With bombs going off everyday and killing dozens of civilians without any defence against this cowardly act. With a corrupt government who will abandon control weeks after you leave. With BILLIONS of dollars and thousands of American lives LOST to the history books without one iota of progress.

Apart from that you've done a pretty good job - almost as good as Vietnam.

BenThere
30th Oct 2013, 19:06
Hey, Thomas. That's the natural state of barbarians. Iraq belongs to Iraq, and so, soon will Afghanistan.

If you don't like it, wherever you are, then you're welcome to try to do something about it. Be my guest!

rgbrock1
30th Oct 2013, 19:13
I notice that you used the word "you" when describing the results of military action in both Iraq and Afghanistan. However, if I recall correctly the UK was involved in the festivities in both places as well. So "you" should be re-worded as "we". And not the Royal "we" either.

As far as the present state of things in both those countries: they've just gone back to behaving the same way as they did before "we" got there. Waste of American, or British, or German, or Italian, or Australian, or Polish lives? No, I don't think so. (Although I will always say that the focus should always have been on Afghanistan and not on Iraq. After the Taliban had been defeated, and left the fields of battle with their tails between their legs, we should have continued our focus on ensuring they didn't return. Had this happened what we are seeing now probably would not be the reality.)

Lonewolf_50
30th Oct 2013, 20:20
. How much is it costing the American Public to prop up Israel?
2-3 billion a year, which I think should be zero per year. The President does not follow my inclinations on that. Mark my words this "disentanglement" from KSA that Obama is going thru is done
for a purpose.
It started when Rummy pulled CENTAF (FWD) out of PSAB as OIF began. You might want to keep up. The "get out of Saudi" has been going on for some years.
One of them will be to disengage from the middle east to a lower level than they have been doing in the past.
Hope you are right about that. We'll see.
America has some hard decisions to make on the home front and overseas Bring the boys home : from Germany. I've been saying that for years. I like Germany, and Germans, but do not believe that there is any need to keep entire combat formations there. Let the Europeans back up their talk, and raise their own armies. :mad: Oh, and build a few more bombs so that your ready service magazines aren't empty after a week or so of air ops, FFS.

parabellum
30th Oct 2013, 23:03
without one iota of progress.

Not so. For at least twelve years large numbers of Afghanis have been able to live a relatively normal life with many children, girls included,gaining an education. It may all fall to pieces after the alliance has left but each partner will be leaving SF training teams behind in the hope that the local military and police can keep the Taliban at bay, due to rabid corruption I see that as wishful thinking, but one can hope.

reynoldsno1
31st Oct 2013, 00:19
Having spent many years in the ME, living and working with Arabs of dirfferent nationalities, the geenral consensus among them was that Saudis, in general, were/are a bunch of pr*cks, and that Saudis from Dhahran west to Riyadh were worst than those on the Red Sea coast.

I recall one morning being in a flight operations complex when a Saudi AF C130 pilot came in and told the Ops guy to file his flight plan. The aircraft actually hailed from Riyadh and they had been scheduled to depart at 1000. It was now about 1500, but that was good time keeping for these guys. The Ops guy asked whether they were still going back to Riyadh, and what was the ETD. The pilot walked out of the door and shouted "File a plan".

The C130 started up and taxiied out, and then a couple of minutes later called Ops ..."We have been cleared as planned to Islamabad. Why you file Islamabad?". The Ops guy replied "You didn't say where you wanted to go. Islamabad's nice this time of year - have a good trip" ....

galaxy flyer
31st Oct 2013, 00:46
Thomas,

Perhaps 106,000 dead is only a good start! If we stay away, it could be 106 million.

Truth of the matter is wars end when one side is exhausted of fighting--a result achieved by killing the enemy, faster results is the killing ending sooner. I'm not in favor of it, but that's history.

GF

parabellum
31st Oct 2013, 03:12
Having spent many years in the ME, living and working with Arabs of dirfferent nationalities, the geenral consensus among them was that Saudis, in general, were/are a bunch of pr*cks, and that Saudis from Dhahran west to Riyadh were worst than those on the Red Sea coast.

Agreed, many years in the ME too. The worst, from the Gulf Arab's point of view, were the Iraqis, treacherous, Kuwaitis, nasty arrogant bast***s, and the Qataris, much like the Kuwaitis.

Andu
31st Oct 2013, 05:58
I have to agree. Most of the Gulf Arabs detest the Saudis, with the Kuwaitis a close second. My own experience with Iraqis I met there was quite the opposite. I found the ones I met (admittedly only a handful) rather nice people, (as were almost all the Iranians I met).

I remember someone saying just after Gulf War 1 that the the best thing the Yanks could have done would have been to have delayed liberating Kuwait for about two years to give the Iraqis time to teach the Kuwaitis some manners.

Many of the Kuwaitis who came to Dubai as "refugees" (yeah, right) after the Iraqi invasion behaved abominably, both towards their hosts and towards expats. I know the local Arabs were glad to see the end of them. Just after GW1, there was an often repeated story of an American soldier having a beer in Pancho Villas (one of the very few pub type venues in Dubai in those days) one night when he struck up a conversation with a very fat Arab, who was also drinking at the bar. When he found out that the Arab was a Kuwaiti, he asked him why he wasn't fighting for his country. The Kuwaiti replied rather dismissively: "We pay people like you to do that." The Yank punched him.

Cacophonix
31st Oct 2013, 06:46
Don't chat up my wife or else...

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01428/Burqa_1428680c.jpg

:\

Caco

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Oct 2013, 07:07
Don't chat up my wife or else......


Wouldn't that be a bit like chatting up a lampshade?:confused:

rgbrock1
31st Oct 2013, 12:01
Speaking of Iraq. Seems Mr. al-Maliki is in Washington D.C. these days, chatting up several of the politicos and basically asking for the U.S. to supply arms, training and perhaps some boots on the ground (advisers). Basically they aren't in a position to deal with Al Qaeda in Iraq whose presence in that country is growing daily.

Perhaps leaving Iraq wasn't all that great of an idea, eh Mr. O'Bummer?

On the other hand, the U.S. could do nothing and leave it to the Iranians to sort it all out.

Cacophonix
31st Oct 2013, 12:04
and perhaps some boots on the ground (advisers)


Are you seriously saying you don't think that there are US (military and other) advisers in Iraq today?

Caco

rgbrock1
31st Oct 2013, 12:06
Caco:

There are. Numbering a couple of hundred. (Or so we're told.) However, Mr. al-Maliki wants more. Many more. And he also stated that if he doesn't get what he wants from the U.S. then he'll go elsewhere. And we all know where elsewhere probably is.

MagnusP
31st Oct 2013, 12:09
Wouldn't that be a bit like chatting up a lampshade?

Yeah, I've got rat-arsed at parties as well, SRT. ;)

1DC
31st Oct 2013, 15:50
Magnus..:D:D:D:D

Thomas coupling
31st Oct 2013, 16:33
Where's it all going to lead then.....

In no particular order:

Saudi is hated by all other Arabs.
Israel is hated by all arabs.
Iran is not every arabs favourite.
Shia hate Sunni.
Palestinians have no-where to live.
Iraq is reverting to lawlessness.
Libya is lawless.
Syria is a bomb site.
Taliban are growing in strength.
Afghanistan is a basket case.
Egypt is a basket case.
Tunisia is on the verge of a nervous breakdown.

America/France/UK are selling arms to them faster than they can make them.

Where will all this end.

I wonder what the Chinese make of all this unrest :rolleyes:

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Oct 2013, 16:49
Yeah, I've got rat-arsed at parties as well, SRT.


One is more the shy retiring type, Mr P. Usually to be found lurking behind a pot plant trying to fish the sausage roll out of one's drink, then making an early departure when one is quite sure no one will notice, mainly because they haven't noticed one is there yet. Not a fan of parties. Have used the elbows occasionally to clear some room around me when it gets crowded.

Record was sis in law's 40th birthday at a bespoke venue. 15 minutes from arrival to sneaky and grateful departure.:ok:

Lonewolf_50
31st Oct 2013, 17:17
I wonder what the Chinese make of all this unrest :rolleyes:
I suspect they are figuring out how to profit from it all.
They sell weapons in the region as well. ;)
What they don't do is get emotionally involved.
Might be the wiser course ...

Captain Dart
31st Oct 2013, 22:59
I wonder what the Chinese make of all this unrest :rolleyes:


They have their own problems with the Uighurs. Interesting development in Tienanmen Square recently.

Lonewolf_50
31st Oct 2013, 23:01
Heard news today the the watchdog group report 21 of 23 sites are cleared of all chem equip and material. The other two are in areas a bit too dangerous to inspect, at the moment.

Good news, I think, from Syria.

arcniz
3rd Nov 2013, 10:01
I wonder what the Chinese make of all this unrest

Opportunity... elsewhere.

Chinese entrepreneurs seem to be making real progress in establishing quasi-colonial ventures & projects in Africa -- mostly all done at low cost and with relatively little local friction, because Chinese-managed economic development seems a better option than none at all.

Solid Rust Twotter
3rd Nov 2013, 17:00
CJ

You do realise she's going to kill and eat you when she finds out what you've been saying about her, right...?:}

Gulfstreamaviator
4th Nov 2013, 03:46
Facebook fans be warned, posting photos online could land you in UAE prison




Even the circulation of pictures and videos of traffic accident victims are considered a crime, the ministry said, according to The National’s Arabic-language sister paper, Al Ittihad.
Lt Col Salah Al Ghoul, head of the bureau for law respect at the Ministry, said that fines of up to Dh500,000 could also be imposed if someone’s privacy is infringed using an “information network”.
“Article 24 of the cybercrimes law stipulates that anyone who uses an information network to infringe upon someone else’s privacy shall be punished by a minimum prison sentence of six months and/or a fine of between Dh150,000 and Dh500,000,” said Lt Col Al Ghoul.
It is believed the warning is aimed primarily at young users of social networking sites.





YOU have been warned, so no whistle blowing, of beating or wheelies on SZR, permitted without express written permission in triplicate.

Ops Normal.

Glf