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View Full Version : I had brain surgery on Sunday. Really.


Aire de Drome
4th Oct 2013, 16:06
Non-invasive brain surgery to rectify chronic neurogenic pain in my feet and ankles. It was successful and, after four years of suffering (it's amazing how it affected normal activities) the pain has gone, the remaining discomfort, which is not severe, will ease as the the nervous system returns to normal. The 'intervention' was carried out in Solothurn, Switzerland by a pioneer in this method. My wife and I are so thrilled I just had to put it on JB.
What a feet. Sorry - feat!
Regards AdD

Noah Zark.
4th Oct 2013, 16:19
Congratulations! Hope the cure lasts!

airship
4th Oct 2013, 16:23
"non-invasive" brain surgery?! :ok:

Was that through the nose, an eye-socket or via the multi-pronged socket installed at the base of your skull...?! ;)

dazdaz1
4th Oct 2013, 17:01
Aire de Drome

Best wishes to you and family.

Daz

er340790
4th Oct 2013, 17:05
I have, for some time, been considering having my brain removed and replaced with a clockwork mouse...

Lot less hassle all-round, I reckon. ;)

superq7
4th Oct 2013, 17:08
Aire

Congratulations, was it a private op or the French equivalent of the UK NHS ?

rgbrock1
4th Oct 2013, 17:08
er:

There are others, even within the confines of this very thread itself, who have indeed had their brains removed. And replaced with poo-poo. :}

angels
4th Oct 2013, 18:02
You called rg?? :}

Yes, congratulations Aire.

I had heart surgery exactly a week today which involved robotic probes in my heart, lasering away pesky nerve endings. The surgeon doing the op (one of only 200 in the world that can do it) was in the next room and operated via robot. I was home in two days.

Can't tell for two months if it has worked (everything seems fine right now), but even if it hasn't, we've tried.

All this on the NHS. A small proportion of the world is extremely lucky and we are among them.

Hope your recovery goes well. :ok:

rgbrock1
4th Oct 2013, 18:09
Aire and angels:

I was NOT alluding to you angels.

And to both of you I wish a speedy recovery and fine health from this day forward. :ok:

Wxgeek
4th Oct 2013, 19:07
All the best gentlemen and continued good health.

I'm curious about the term "Non-invasive brain surgery"...how does it work?

rgbrock1
4th Oct 2013, 19:23
wx wrote:

I'm curious about the term "Non-invasive brain surgery"...how does it work?

It's actually not all that complicated. They simply make a large incision in your skull, remove your brain and then operate it on a table nearby. When they're done, they put your brain back into your skull.

Unfortunately for some though (and you know exactly who you are) sometimes mistakes are made and the skull is sewed up shut sans brain.

wings folded
4th Oct 2013, 19:35
A common procedure where you are? Unheard of here.

Aire de Drome
5th Oct 2013, 16:40
Thanks for your good wishes. The treatment consists of a very, very accurate bombardment (so to speak) of ultra-sound into the small part of the brain which has been identified by various scans as the naughty bits. The 5 hour surgery, during which 1,000+ ultra-sound zaps are concentrated on the appropriate parts of the brain,is guided by an MRI scanner (made by General Electrics!) and, of course the whole thing is monitored very closely at all times. It's not always pleasant. Hope this makes sense, it's not very easy to explain.
Superq7, This was done privately in Switzerland by, I believe, one of only two surgeons able to do this. He pioneered the method having done 20 years of the Black and Decker type of surgery. The French health system does not recognise this. Yet.

cattletruck
5th Oct 2013, 16:55
Methinks they use a pair of ultra-sound waves to create a standing wave at the problem spot to neuter it. This makes it a permanent pain killer. I believe the pain from feet is still there but the brain is no longer responding to it. Could now be a good party trick walking over hot coals or running the next marathon (just kidding).

Congratulations and glad to hear it went well and you are pain free.

OFSO
5th Oct 2013, 17:07
robotic probes in my heart

An acquaintance here kept fainting: heart surgeon in Barcelona said there are only two conditions causing your problem: it's the former as if it were the latter you'd be dead by now.

Had similar treatment, nerve endings in heart cauterised via a probe (not a probes) - surgeon gave him a very large glass of what my acquaintance said was an excellent brandy afterwards. (As in IMMEDIATELY after the surgery). Was a complete sucess.....been OK for years now.

Aire de Drome
6th Oct 2013, 15:14
Lone Ranger. No negatives, some discomfort but that's to be expected. Apart from the immediate relief, and the prospect of all symptom gradually easing, there was the absolute delight of me and my wife meeting Professor Jeanmonod and his team in Solothurn. Back in three months for checks, but I'll be a lot more comfy! Oh, I almost forgot, there's the cost...
Best Regards, AdD.

rotornut
6th Oct 2013, 21:14
Last November I had developed a subdural hematoma after a fall in August. The solution was to drill a hole in my skull and insert a tube attached to a small plastic bottle to drain the blood. Well, it worked. I was given a general anaesthetic and the whole procedure didn't take more than half an hour. I spent just over 2 hours in recovery, given morphine to relieve the pain which was like an intense headache, and then taken back to my room. I was released the following day and a follow up CT scan showed no trace of the hematoma.

Aire de Drome
7th Oct 2013, 11:51
Wonderful news, Rotornut. Almost a miracle. Here's wishing you a healthy, fall-free life.
AdD

rotornut
8th Oct 2013, 09:30
Many thanks AdD and glad yours went so well! And my neurosurgeon said no more falls please.