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OFSO
4th Oct 2013, 12:53
The tumble dryer has started rumbling. Really really loud, like elephants stampeding over Gene Krupa's drum set. I took the top off and rotated the drum and it rumbled, oh yes it did.

Mrs OFSO was trying to work out how old it is but she has trouble counting over 35 years. So the question is, repair or replace ? Or is it even necessary to ask ?

Either way, our lovely young cleaning lady was exhausted running up and down the road for two hours trailing the freshly-washed sheets over her head, so something has to be done.

MagnusP
4th Oct 2013, 12:56
Either way, our lovely young cleaning lady was exhausted running up and down the road for two hours trailing the freshly-washed sheets over her head, so something has to be done.

You could offer to sponge down her naked and gently perspiring body. You know it's the right thing to do. HTH.

Dak Man
4th Oct 2013, 12:59
....you could help her out by not continually leaving skid marks on sheets.......

cattletruck
4th Oct 2013, 13:06
our lovely young cleaning lady was exhausted running up and down the road for two hours trailing the freshly-washed sheets over her head

I would just hung them on a line. Oh well, each to their own. :rolleyes:

MagnusP
4th Oct 2013, 13:09
..you could help her out by not continually leaving skid marks on sheets.......

I preferred my idea. :)

M.Mouse
4th Oct 2013, 13:16
Sounds like the bearings. Depends on the machine and whether you do it yourself or pay someone. If the machine is old but well made I would change them myself. If paying someone else or the machine was not an expensive quality machine I would replace the machine.

The first question to ask is how long is a piece of string.

G&T ice n slice
4th Oct 2013, 13:34
The first question to ask is how long is a piece of string.

precisely this long

from experience tumble driers are usually pretty cheap so just thro it away and get another cheap one.

(added advantage - throwing it away really upsets the leftwing pinko liberal commie tree-hugging savethewhales globalwarmist crowd)

ExRAFRadar
4th Oct 2013, 13:40
Second the throw it away and get a new one.

Few years ago ours started playing up. The missus (now ex) spent about £100 getting people in to fix it. Month later spent £200 on a new one.

Lightning Mate
4th Oct 2013, 14:00
Buy German.

Loose rivets
4th Oct 2013, 14:10
The drum on my American one just comes out. Well, after you've peeled the darn case off. Drum rolls (groan) on two bands of strong stuff stuck to its periphery, and is not held by a bearing at all.

BOAC
4th Oct 2013, 14:50
I thought it was normally a "rumble ON the Zanuusi"?

radeng
4th Oct 2013, 16:31
If you buy a new one, get the supplier to take the old one away, or you will have to dispose of it in accordance with the WEE Directive.

Krystal n chips
4th Oct 2013, 16:37
" (added advantage - throwing it away really upsets the leftwing pinko liberal commie tree-hugging savethewhales globalwarmist crowd) "

G n T..I say old boy, you seem to have had one tipple too many without the tonic !......praise where praise is due old chap....those of us who fall into any of the above definitions do indeed support your wish to re-cycle and use greener energy products.....what on earth made you think we would be offended ??.

Of course, I do hope that I have not misconstrued your "throwing away" as fly tipping on some leafy shire road which would, after all, be a jolly naughty thing to do now wouldn't it ?.....I was going to mention principles here, and a man of, but, sadly, I seem to recall your threw those out with, presumably, the dishwater some time ago.....:p

Dushan
4th Oct 2013, 16:41
Over 35 years old say replace, it owes you nothing, but OTOH it is probably better made than anything you will buy today. If parts are available and there is an old repairman who knows how to fix it, I'd fix it.

New ones all have electronic control panels which go after about a year of shaking and humid environment and cost 100s to replace.

or is it really this, and we all misunderstood your title…

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ee/Victoria5.jpg

OFSO
4th Oct 2013, 17:24
If you buy a new one, get the supplier to take the old one away,

They always do - everything you buy, they take the old one off. Fridge, dryer, cooker, TV etc.

Bit of a bummer really as if I take the old one down to the recycling centre myself I earn points off my annual rates (community tax) bill for next year.

superq7
4th Oct 2013, 17:38
In my Skip business people pay ME to take away LDI 's ( large domestic appliances) I then store them up then weigh them in at the scrap yard, so I get paid twice,lovely jubbly.

rogerg
4th Oct 2013, 17:45
I have a contract with Domestic and General which keeps all my machines going until parts are not available. Then they supply a new machine. Its solves all the hassle and covers 7 machines for about £15 a month. I like an easy life.

Molemot
4th Oct 2013, 18:04
A month or so ago I changed the bearings on my Hotpoint washing machine. Cost me £6.50 and a few hours work. Quite interesting to dig into the works, too!

Sunnyjohn
4th Oct 2013, 19:17
We had the bearing go on our LG 6 year old washing machine. We got a quote for €120. A new LG was €600. We discussed the ins and outs. Spend €120 on a six year old machine. Then the pump goes - another €80. Then the motor fails - €150. Guess what we did? Now Mrs SJ is very happy with the latest LG which does the job quieter, faster and with less energy, using less water - and it plays a pretty tune when it starts and stops. And, yes, I could have tackled it myself and got a new bearing from a supplier round the corner but, I'm delighted to say, Mrs SJ was happier with a new machine, And so was I - I like the pretty tunes.

Fareastdriver
4th Oct 2013, 19:26
rogerg has got the right idea. Tell D&G what you have and they will make up a deal to cover everything.
The forget worrying about domestic appliances for the rest of your life.

OFSO
4th Oct 2013, 19:42
Sadly we don't have contracts like that on domestic appliances in Spain.

On domestics, that's another story......

ShyTorque
4th Oct 2013, 20:10
My missus has a contractor who charges much less than £15 a month - me.

It is surprising how cheaply bearings can be bought from a specialist supplier, often for a fraction of the cost of a manufacturers branded part. All you need is a digital caliper to get the measurements for the part needed, and the internet to search the on-line catalogues.

I recently replaced some worn out parts in my car's gear-change linkage for about £11. Manufacturer's OE parts price (none in UK, so special order needed) was a shade under £200, not including carriage costs.

Zeppelin
4th Oct 2013, 20:55
Always find it beneficial to type the make and problem into gooogle and see what comes up.

In the meantime, very disappointed not to see pictures of said cleaner running down the camino. Cleaners by neccessarty are always large breasted and of interest to your collegues for future reference.

(Spelling police- sorry)

gingernut
4th Oct 2013, 21:01
Got any string.... Wooden Pegs 50 Pack (http://www.poundland.co.uk/wooden-pegs-50-pack)

Windy Militant
4th Oct 2013, 22:14
With regard to these all sing all dancing machines.
A mate who spent a good deal of his working life changing bearings on industrial water pumps of various sizes had a washing machine that started grumbling. He was all for putting some new bearings in to cure the problem but his misses insisted that with a little one on the way a new machine would be the way to go. So a new hi spec machine was duly purchased.
All seemed well until he got a call at work saying the machine wouldn't work.
It seems that having loaded the machine set the programme and started the machine, it announced "service now" or similar and refused to do anything even open the door, despite turning off and on again.
So a call was made to the emergency help line and an emergency service call booked.
The technician duly shows up opens a flap on the machine plugs in a laptop and enters a code, unplugs lap top and the machine starts and runs as if nothing had happened. It was at this point that it was pointed out that the machine would have to be serviced every X many cycles. An emergency call out was about £160 and a standard call out £90 a go. I'm not sure if my mate has managed to get hold of the code to reset the thing or if he just shells out the cash every eight or nine months.

TWT
5th Oct 2013, 06:50
WM,if you happen to find out the make/model let us know,so we can avoid it.Of course,it is likely that a lot of them will be like that now.

crippen
5th Oct 2013, 07:58
to get back to the original question



all of the domestic driers I have worked on just have a small bearing at the back to support the drum there. The front of the drum runs on a lip on the drum supported by a lip on the front of the machine. To cut the noise out,a strip of 'felt' is in between the two bits of metal. The felt eventually wears out and a horrible rumbling noise ensues. Great engineering !!!!:hmm:

and the lips eventually wear out causing the lot to collapse.



edit. What do expect of a drier designed in Italy

main_dog
5th Oct 2013, 08:46
edit. What do expect of a drier designed in Italy


The thing is over 35 years old... how long do you expect it to last? :confused:

El Grifo
5th Oct 2013, 09:30
and the lips eventually wear out causing the lot to collapse.


New cleaning ladies are not hard to find in OSFO´s part of the word luckily !!

OFSO
5th Oct 2013, 09:43
designed in Italy

IMHO, Italian design is pretty good - certainly better than German design. It's the implementation where the Italians fall down. Designed by Italians, built by Germans - that's the ticket.

I went looking for a new tumble dryer this morning. Very few on offer, perhaps because of the weather here. Range in price from €199 (Biko) to over €1000 (Miele heat pump.)

Guy in the shop told me "buy the Spanish one with the Spanish maker's name: all these German ones are actually built at the same Spanish factory in Spain."

Takan Inchovit
5th Oct 2013, 09:43
lovely young cleaning lady

Tumble her instead.

OFSO
5th Oct 2013, 10:23
Ah, yes.

No way I can see to get under the drum from where the grinding sound comes. Also when switching off the dryer, the drum slows, stops, then there's a grinding sound and it kicks round again for a partial revolution. Flywheel on motorshaft underneath ? Look, this was made long ago, solid and complex engineering.

(I saw one dryer this morning, not cheap, with PLASTIC hinges on the door).

OFSO
5th Oct 2013, 10:25
New cleaning ladies are not hard to find in OSFO´s part of the word luckily !!

Not true. Good ones are hard to find. Needless to say, like every other hard worker here, ours is English. The Spanish have all gone off to work in cafès in London.

OFSO
8th Oct 2013, 13:11
Ordered a new one today (tumble dryer, not cleaning lady). From looking at the ones on display in the DIY shop, it's obvious that the prestige German models are made in the same factory in Spain as the humble Spanish models, but cost 15% - 20% more.

Collection and disposal of the old one is down on the bill as costing €0.01 - but wasn't charged.

toffeez
8th Oct 2013, 13:37
Missus heard a terrible groaning noise yesterday but it wasn't the dryer.

I think the cleaning lady is suffering from an overdose of vibration.

El Grifo
8th Oct 2013, 14:34
Yep OFSO, Balay is the name and free removal of old appliance is normally the game.

Here in the Autonomous Regions anyway :)

El G.

OFSO
8th Oct 2013, 15:47
Balay is the name

Actually Mr Grifo, the one we finally bought, named after Sergeant Bilko, I believe, is made in a shed next door to Balays site and they are transported out under the cover of darkness.

However unlike the Balays, Boschs and Siemens on display in our local dealer, the one we purchased has metal door hinges.

Blues&twos
8th Oct 2013, 20:25
I had a jockey wheel failure on our tumble drier.
A complete and utter wotsit to get to. I DID get to it, but then couldn't figure out how to put the bloody thing back together.
Took it, as a pile of bits and sheet metal, up to the tip and bought a new one.

OFSO
9th Oct 2013, 13:42
New tumble dryer delivered and it works. It's a ducted BEKO, second cousin to the dreaded exploding condenser BEKO. I'm now starting to think how to recover some of the waste heat from the pipe. Some interesting home-made heat exchanger designs on the 'net. What I really need is to fit a lint trap on the machine and then blast the warm hot air straight into the house. But can't find anything like that on sale, at least in Europe.

With the BEKO came an energy certificate telling me it uses on average 514 kWh/annum. Interesting considering it doesn't know how many people are in my household or what the weather in the next 'annum' is going to be.