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SMT Member
2nd Oct 2013, 17:02
The author Tom Clancy has passed away, at the age of only 66. Many a good hour spent in the company of his books.

AlphaZuluRomeo
2nd Oct 2013, 17:12
Indeed.

I understand his last book is to be published in december (US)...

Dak Man
2nd Oct 2013, 17:14
Me too, although IMHO the books went downhill when he started co-writing stuff.

I think "Without Remorse" is my personal Clancy fave.

RIP

Lonewolf_50
2nd Oct 2013, 17:38
He made his mark. Wrote some good stuff. Vaya con Dios, Tom. :ok:

con-pilot
2nd Oct 2013, 17:51
His books saved my sanity on many a long, boring layovers I can tell you. He wrote very enjoyable books and had some really good movies made from them.

A talent such as his will be missed. He redefined the modern day spy novel.

SOPS
2nd Oct 2013, 17:51
Very sad, loved all hi books, but as someone else said, they went a bit down hill we he started co writing. The Sum of All Fears was my favourite.

BenThere
2nd Oct 2013, 18:13
What I really appreciated about Clancy was his accuracy.

At his peak, he wrote about things with which I had direct involvement in the Air Force. He knew how SAC operated and what the everyday line guy, like me, experienced.

I read several of his books and can't recall ever having felt he got it wrong in representing the areas in which I had some expertise. That made him unique.

goudie
2nd Oct 2013, 19:03
I loved the detail in his early books.
A Tom Clancy novel was always absorbing. He had that rare ability to transport you to right into the centre of the action
RIP Mr Clancy.

anotherthing
2nd Oct 2013, 20:22
Must admit I have enjoyed reading his books. High brow they are not but they are well written and a good bit of light entertainment.

I agree with other posters above; the later books that were co-written were not as good and I gave up after reading two of them. A lot of top selling authors seem to do this now... Patterson is another. I actually am of the opinion that there isn't much co-writing going on and that is is actually a form of sponsorship, or a leg-up for less well known authors, I think at best the big named writers who put their names to these joint ventures do nothing much more than give some guidance (and get a fee for it). The inclusion of their name ensures that sales are bigger then they would've been otherwise. I honestly think that it is a marketing tool used by publishers.

66 is no age nowadays and it is sad to hear of his passing

late-joiner
2nd Oct 2013, 21:02
Good books.
Red Storm Rising was even on our Army Staff College reading list in 87.
RIP

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Oct 2013, 21:24
Sad to hear. Mr Clancy's books kept me from chewing off my fingers while spending months in a tent in the middle of nowhere.

radeng
2nd Oct 2013, 22:22
De mortuis nil nisi bonum. I can't find anything bad about him, anyway.

RIP

Andu
2nd Oct 2013, 22:52
I really enjoyed his early stuff. I knew a bloke who was the boss at the RAN Antisubmarine School and he told me there were a couple of details in Hunt for the Red October that he thought were a bit far-fetched - until he looked them up in documentation not freely available to the public and found that they weren't.

Re the comments about his later books: I have to agree. I had the distinct impression that his total involvement in the actual writing of them amounted to little more than putting his name on the cover.

Dak Man
2nd Oct 2013, 22:59
I think that his early books were all loosely based on stuff that really happened. He obviously had good sources, bit like the writers of Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister.

He was writing about terrs flying planes into US buildings long before 11th September.

Ref the above UK TV show (Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister) if you've not seen it or heard of it, do yourselves a favour and watch them all - classic TV.

con-pilot
3rd Oct 2013, 00:13
Ref the above UK TV show (Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister) if you've not seen it or heard of it, do yourselves a favour and watch them all - classic TV.

I agree, I have the entire series on DVDs. :ok:

Seldomfitforpurpose
3rd Oct 2013, 00:39
Jack Ryan was about as loveable as it gets but John Kelly was one truly bad dude, please excuse the uncalled for youthful parlance :ok:

7x7
3rd Oct 2013, 00:47
I have to admit to struggling to believe the John Kelly and his Hispanic offsider could learn to speak Russian "with a St Petersburg accent" well enough to pass for locals to your average Russian. But hey, he still knocked out some damn fine reads before he went to "co-writing", (which I think were VERY heavily weighted towards the "co".).

I thought the movie adaptation of Patriot Games was a very poor effort by (I think it was) Peter Weir.

bnt
3rd Oct 2013, 00:55
Jerry Pournelle has written up some of his memories of Tom Clancy, here (http://www.jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/?p=15569). Tom was a fan of Jerry's and sent him an autographed copy of Hunt for Red October, and they became friends of sorts.
Tom once told me that a lot of his classmates went into the Navy and were doing all these neat things, and he thought somebody ought to tell about them. He had in those days fairly rigid writing schedule habits – on a visit to his home I once spent two hours telling stories to the children while Tom went into his room and pounded away on his Mac – and he was a good story teller. His success was deserved.

parabellum
3rd Oct 2013, 01:21
Red Storm Rising followed by Hunt for Red October are my favourites, the one that made me squirm and I really couldn't finish was the one about the assassination attempt on Charles and Di, that one should never have been written, IMHO.

11Fan
3rd Oct 2013, 03:22
Seldomfitforpurpose,

John Kelly was one truly bad dude

Perhaps you meant John Clark? Before the movies came out, a friend and I would trying to decide who would portray that character best. I always thought Brian Dennehy would be perfect, but a slimmer version perhaps. As for the movies, when they came out, Willem Dafoe in Clear and Present Danger was best, but I liked Liev Schreiber's portrayal in The Sum of all Fears as well.

As for the series, Debt of Honor was my favorite. Imagine that ending today.

RIP Mr. Clancy. You kept me entertained, and still do.

con-pilot
3rd Oct 2013, 03:32
RIP Mr. Clancy. You kept me entertained, and still do.

As usual, you sumed it up the best. :ok:

My wife and I have been counting all the Clancy books we have since we heard about his death and I am a bit surprised about all of the first edtions I have.

None signed. :{

ArthurR
3rd Oct 2013, 06:03
Loved all of his books, sad to hear of his death. R.I.P. Mr Clancy.

westhawk
3rd Oct 2013, 06:06
Perhaps you meant John Clark?Read Without Remorse to find out how John Kelly became Mr. Clark. Same man, but transformed by his experiences into the perfect man for the tasks Admiral Greer assigned him. Clancy constructs the character of Mr. Clark in much the same way as he constructed his story plots. Detailed and nuanced. As cold and calculating as Mr. Clark appears at face value in other Clancy works, Without Remorse shows him to be a man with a uniquely developed sense of right and wrong. And a great passion for righting wrongs. Without remorse.

I don't find Clancy's collaborative works that appealing either, with the definite exception of Red Storm Rising. I enjoyed all of the Jack Ryan books and several of his non-fiction profiles of military units.

From what I've read about the man and his life, he died with many good friends and many beneficiaries of his patronage. We should all live so well as to be able to say that.

westhawk

BillHicksRules
3rd Oct 2013, 08:31
RIP Tom.

As others have said, many an enjoyable hour spent reading your works.

Without Remorse was the pinnacle of his output but my favourite was always Hunt For Red October. Was pretty much unlike anything else that came before it and created a genre (techno-thriller) for those who came after like Brown, Bond, Cobb et al.

Seldomfitforpurpose
3rd Oct 2013, 09:27
Read Without Remorse to find out how John Kelly became Mr. Clark. Same man, but transformed by his experiences into the perfect man for the tasks Admiral Greer assigned him. Clancy constructs the character of Mr. Clark in much the same way as he constructed his story plots. Detailed and nuanced. As cold and calculating as Mr. Clark appears at face value in other Clancy works, Without Remorse shows him to be a man with a uniquely developed sense of right and wrong. And a great passion for righting wrongs. Without remorse.



Exactly :ok:

JEM60
3rd Oct 2013, 10:45
On recommendation, I bought 'Sum of all fears'. The first Clancy I read. Wow, what a book. Later, I was walking down my high street and collided with a gent who was reading the last few chapters as he walked along. He apologised profusely, saying he just had to keep reading it on the way to his office. Very involved, fantastic detail. Read them all with great pleasure, but not the collaborations.

Tolsti
3rd Oct 2013, 11:03
Going to DL and read all the real Tom Clancys again.

SOPS
3rd Oct 2013, 11:26
I must admit I never really enjoyed Red Storm Rising. Perhaps I will give it another go.

11Fan
3rd Oct 2013, 14:52
Read Without Remorse to find out how John Kelly became Mr. Clark.

Thank you westhawk, I shall.

My mistake SFFP. :\

rgbrock1
3rd Oct 2013, 15:12
SRT wrote:

Sad to hear. Mr Clancy's books kept me from chewing off my fingers while spending months in a tent in the middle of nowhere.Wearing a pink tutu inside the tent, no doubt! :}

I think that over the years I've read just about all his books. Whenever I was "out in the field" I always had a Tom Clancy book with me which helped while away the time spent pulling guard duty. But of all his books I've read I must say my favorite is his latest: 'Threat Vector'. Although he wrote it with another author 'Threat Vector' was right up there with 'Hunt for Red October', and 'Sum of All Fears'. A thoroughly gripping read and rather prescient.

BenThere:

I understand Clancy's hitting the nail on the head as far as air warfare is concerned. However, he was also very adept, and accurate, in describing infantry warfare. Perhaps not as accurate as, say, Larry Bonds. But close, oh so close.

seacue
3rd Oct 2013, 16:43
Long obit in the Baltimore Sun.

Tom Clancy, author of "The Hunt for Red October" and "Patriot Games," dead at 66 - baltimoresun.com (http://tinyurl.com/m57um2x)

Dak Man
3rd Oct 2013, 19:31
Interesting angle.

Clancy died in hospital yesterday at the age of 66. He was the author of numerous high profile books, many of which were turned into movies, including The Hunt For Red October and Patriot Games.

Steve Piezcenik is a former deputy assistant secretary of state under four different presidents who also co-authored around 30 books with Clancy.

Piezcenik confirmed that Clancy was “suspicious” about 9/11, noting that he had written a book which depicted a similar attack years before. The plot of Clancy’s 1994 novel Debt of Honor revolves around a Japanese terrorist hijacking and crashing a jetliner into the US Capitol.

“So when Condoleezza Rice responded in front of the 9/11 Commission that nobody had ever thought of this concept that a plane could have been attacking any one of our buildings….Tom had already written about this almost ten years beforehand and it was well known,” said Piezcenik, adding that fictional plots revolving around terrorism had to first be cleared with national security officials.

Solid Rust Twotter
3rd Oct 2013, 20:22
Wearing a pink tutu inside the tent, no doubt!


It was all very camp.:}






(See what I did there?)

Seldomfitforpurpose
4th Oct 2013, 00:02
Thank you westhawk, I shall.

My mistake SFFP. :\

Truly no drama, the bit where Kelly questioned one of the drug dealers using the decompression chamber, proper nasty :ok:

Dak Man
4th Oct 2013, 01:59
As mentioned Without Remorse is my favourite, going to read it again :8

westhawk
4th Oct 2013, 05:39
Thank you westhawk, I shall.

11Fan, I do hope you enjoy Without Remorse as much as I did. I read it after having read most of the Jack Ryan series of books in which "Clark" appears and found the character study quite compelling.


the bit where Kelly questioned one of the drug dealers using the decompression chamber, proper nasty http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif

SFFP: Yes, that part of the story vastly exceeded any revenge fantasies I've ever had by a fair margin. As far as the story goes, the technique employed in this instance proved very effective in gaining valuable intel for his personal "op" too...

I must admit I never really enjoyed Red Storm Rising. Perhaps I will give it another go. SOPS: I found it to have a bit of a slow start myself, but once it got going I saw the value of the long lead-up to the action. I felt that the background on how the fictional war got started and who the Soviet players were added context to the events as they unfolded.

I read this story the first time when I was stationed in Germany late in the cold war era. Perhaps the relevance of the story to the scenarios for which we trained had something to do with my interest level. I had little doubt at the time that a real engagement with Soviet forces in Europe would have been at least as destructive and chaotic as depicted in the story. Now, with the benefit of hindsight and later revelations regarding the true nature of '80s era Soviet capabilities and preparedness levels, I better understand now how the cold war was conducted and why our side "won". And I'm still thankful that theory never had to be put into practice. Still, Red Storm Rising was extremely popular among my fellow cold warriors in our aviation unit and with our cohorts in the Cav up at the border. I hope you enjoy the story more next time around.

westhawk

airship
4th Oct 2013, 16:51
I've yet to see any conclusive evidence that the real Tom Clancy is truly dead (eg. copy of death certificate or coroner's autopsy report) etc.

Just 66 years old and probably worth several hundred US$ millions, if not several billions? Perhaps Tom decided to go by the way of Elvis, preferring live out the rest of his life in incognito...?

Whatever, I'm almost 100% sure that (if his agent / publishers) have anything to do with it, we've not yet heard the last from Mr. "Tom Clancy". Unless I'm much mistaken, under the "Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988", Tom Clancy and/or his publishers may have since asserted their rights: "The right of Tom Clancy to be identified as the Author of the Work has been asserted by him in accordance..." Just take a look at the last paperback you bought, in the first few pages, you'll come across something similar.

Personally, I'm just putting the finishing touches to my novel "Hunt For Reds In October", using many anti-commie resources from JB, and which I hope will eventually be published under the name of "Tom Clancy", perhaps in 2014 or later, and earn me several US$ 10s of thousands... :ok:

Matari
4th Oct 2013, 17:02
Touching tribute here from Peggy Noonan (http://blogs.wsj.com/peggynoonan/2013/10/02/tom-clancy-rip/) regarding her friend Tom Clancy.

I like this part:
Tom Clancy loved Camden Yards, the Yeoman Warders of Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress the Tower of London, and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he was proud to tell me a few years ago he’d bought research chairs in ophthalmology and pediatric oncology, the latter a great passion. Tom’s father had been a mailman there; now Tom was sending notes to Stephen Hawking telling him of the Neurology Department’s latest clinical trials. He found this part of his life delicious—that he had risen so far, just like an American—and common, too. To him, his story was the classic one of his country and the essence of its dream: Here you can start from anywhere and go on to anything. He was proudly sentimental and loved the unheralded—regular, uncelebrated people who yet make everything run, who keep the whole thing going. He had a gift for praise and dwelled on the excellence of others. He noticed it. When someone—a clerk, a president—was a jerk, he summed the person up with an earthy epithet and moved on. Life is too short, let’s talk about the good guys.

rgbrock1
4th Oct 2013, 17:03
airship wrote:

I've yet to see any conclusive evidence that the real Tom Clancy is truly dead (eg. copy of death certificate or coroner's autopsy report) etc.

Well then, we'll get with Clancy's publishers and demand the proof of his death. And once we have succeeded in our demands being met we will further demand that a copy of Clancy's death certificate be provided to one Mr. Airship of Bumf**k, France.

All hail airship. The Demander of Proof.

SMT Member
4th Oct 2013, 17:08
The plot of Clancy’s 1994 novel Debt of Honor revolves around a Japanese terrorist hijacking and crashing a jetliner into the US Capitol.

Except, as anyone who've read the book will tell you, it wasn't. It was the skipper who killed his effo and steered the ship into Capitol Hill.

Dak Man
10th Jan 2014, 14:21
Anyone read the new Jack Ryan novel yet?

In the middle of reading "Threat Vector" - thoroughly enjoying it so far - typical Clancy.

tony draper
10th Jan 2014, 16:17
Sad indeed,Mr Clancy penned a good ripping yarn.:(

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 16:22
Dak Man:

I've read 'Threat Vector' twice, so far. Rather precient eh?

Once I get through a couple of books in my library which I've been intending to read, I shall endeavor to re-read Threat Vector a third time.

A damn good read.

Dak Man
10th Jan 2014, 16:35
Yep 'tis good.

Will get to the new Clancy novel when I'm done with TV.

I'm enjoying Stephen Hunter's books also at the mo, not in Clancy's league but nontheless entertaining.

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 16:39
Stephen Hunter? Never heard of him. I shall open up a browser tab for Amazon purposes and take a look.

Dak Man
10th Jan 2014, 16:53
Seen the movie "Shooter" Bob Lee Swagger, with Mark Wahlberg? it's based on a Hunter Novel, "Point of Impact" a great yarn, the movie is also entertaining.

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2014, 17:02
Didn't see the movie "Shooter" but after looking it up and reading the plot I'm going to make it a point to see it. Thanks. :ok:

airship
10th Jan 2014, 17:48
rgbrock1 wrote: Well then, we'll get with Clancy's publishers and demand the proof of his death. And once we have succeeded in our demands being met we will further demand that a copy of Clancy's death certificate be provided to one Mr. Airship of Bumf**k, France.

All hail airship. The Demander of Proof.

After some 5-6 years absence, I went down to my 2nd hand English book-store about a week ago. Bought used paperbacks of Wilbur Smith's "Those In Peril" (copyright Wilbur Smith 2011) and "The Truimph Of The Sun" (copyright Wilbur Smith 2005). The former was absolute tripe, absolutely no way written by the original Wilbur Smith - perhaps he merely "narrated" the story to his author / secretary and the publishers did the rest...?! However, I just began reading the latter "The Truimph Of The Sun" (copyright Wilbur Smith 2005). Now that's the "Wilbur Smith" I've admired ever since reading his first novels back in the '70s.

PUBLISHERS: STOP selling us novels supposedly written by X but in fact written by cretins.

PS. I very rapidly got bored by the later "Tom Clancy" novels once he began writing "made for TV-shite" stuff...?! (Not to be confused with his earlier novels which were made into Hollywood films...).

con-pilot
10th Jan 2014, 18:09
Huh, Wilbur Smith is still alive and very active at the age of 81. Now perhaps he does not pick up a pen and actually write his new books on legal pads, including those that go all the way back to 2005.

However, if he dictates his new novels or uses a computer, the books are still by him. Even if he uses a 'ghost writer' for filling in the color bits, they are still his concepts, ideas and story line.

So I'll keep buying the new books he writes and publishes.

airship
10th Jan 2014, 18:23
So I'll keep buying the new books he writes and publishes. "Wilbur Smith" has never published his own books as far as I'm aware, relying on Internationally-reknowned publishers to handle that side of things. If you can afford to buy new paperbacks, then "good for you"?! Have you actually read either of the 2 novels by "Wilbur Smith" mentionned above? Or are you just expressing "hot air" because it's airship who raised some deranging questions here...?! :}

cornish-stormrider
10th Jan 2014, 18:39
Sadly missed,
I first read red October, then I tried Red Storm Rising........

Holeee shit, no kidding, picked it up on a Friday from the library, did not sleep till Sunday when I finished it,
His later works lose it a bit, after sum of all fears.

But I still love the Bear and the Dragon.
Without Remorse is excellent, as is Cardinal of the Kremlin

I enjoyed red rabbit but it was not his best.

Regardless, he is one of my top five authors,

FYI, and in no order:
Tom Clancy
Terry Pratchett
Tolkien
Elizabeth Moon
Matthew Reilly, he is like Clancy on a huge dose of speed....

RIP Tom, and thanks for the many good old fashioned military shitkicker novels.

ruddman
10th Jan 2014, 18:48
Confession, haven't read any yet. Still going through all of Cusslers. Bit of a Dirk Pitt fan. Yeah, kinda basic compared to Clancy, but hey, all good.

I do like the technical stuff though. Look forward to reading some. Quick question. Is t recommended to start at the beginning so to speak?

con-pilot
10th Jan 2014, 19:08
"Wilbur Smith" has never published his own books as far as I'm aware

Okay, I give up. One does not have to publish their own books, to have books published.

I cannot make it any simpler than that. :ugh:

:rolleyes: Good grief Charlie Brown.

cornish-stormrider
10th Jan 2014, 19:39
Ruddman, I'd definitely recommend going in chronological order but do red storm rising first as it is a total stand alone novel, and I think his best.....

ruddman
10th Jan 2014, 20:05
Thank you, Cornish-stormrider.

Andu
10th Jan 2014, 21:44
Gerald Seymour (of 'Harry's Game' fame) is up there among the best thriller writers in my opinion.

If you haven't read his stuff, start with 'Holding the Zero' (Saddam-era Iraq) and 'Rat Run' - (present day London). Rat Run in particular would ring quite a few bells for any ex-serviceman who has returned to a less than rapturous welcome from a war.

finfly1
11th Jan 2014, 04:51
When I ran out of Clancy, Crichton and Ludlum novels, a librarian recommended that I try some written by the recently deceased Vince Flynn. Finished all 14 of them, like popcorn. Now reading Jack Higgins. Note duly taken of Hunter, Smith and Seymour for the future.

SawMan
11th Jan 2014, 12:07
Very few fiction writers keep me engaged, but Tom Clancy was one that did because of the realism and the believability, as well as the talent it takes to write a really good story. His efforts will last well beyond the present times and become classics- the most certain sign of a really good writer.

R.I.P. and thanks for the joy you've brought to so many.

Ozzy
11th Jan 2014, 19:51
Hope I am not breaking the Official Secrets Act, but there were a meeting once in a country and a time long, long, ago... one attendee was late and apologized. By about an hour as I recall. He was told to read The Hunt For Red October to catch up on what he missed...Seriously!

Ozzy

Andu
11th Jan 2014, 21:12
ozzy, along the same lines... I was enjoying a beach holiday not long after The Hunt for the Red October was released and the bloke in the house next door was the commander of the RAN's antisubmarine school. He told me that when he read the book, he came upon two or three items that caused him to say to himself: "Ah, he got that a bit wrong..." But then he went into the latest stuff available to the school to check and found that TC had got it right.

I heard Clancy spent two or three days in custody after the release of THftRO, until he convinced the Powers That Be that he'd gleaned all the highly sensitive information he'd disclosed in the book from open source publications.

JEM60
12th Jan 2014, 10:39
I have read all the Tom Clancy books bar his latest. I have recently read 7 Gerald Seymour's in a row. Excellent, but require concentration. Beautiful use of English......

JEM60
12th Jan 2014, 10:45
I have read all the genuine' Clancy books, bar his latest one. I have recently read 7 Gerald Seymour novels in a row. Very much in the Tom Clancy mould as regards scene setting and detail. Seymour has a superb command of proper English. His books demand a high level of concentration, as they tend to dart from place to place. Well worth reading though.

cornish-stormrider
12th Jan 2014, 12:56
Did anyone ever tell the rumour that Mr Clancy was actually working for the CIA,
The idea was that he published tHFRO and then Cardinal , the Russians read them and have kittens on the lines of if this is what the fiction writer is allowed to publish what are they really capable of.......,