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View Full Version : No, seriously, what DO Australians eat for breakfast?


blue up
30th Sep 2013, 19:05
Help. Serious question time.

First visit to the UK of my distant relatives since my great Uncle jumped ship from the Royal Navy in 1922. Big family knees-up with about 140+ turning up from Aus, USA, Dubai and all points in between.

Problem is that we are going to be hosting the Aus contingent and will be wanting to give 'em something for breakfast when they arrive. I asked around locally but nobody knows what Aussies eat for breakers.

Any tips?



Also, is Marmite different from Veggiemite?

Fantome
30th Sep 2013, 19:52
Is this not better started in JB?


standard outback and station fare - a whopping big plate of steak and eggs

none of your wussy continental breakfasts

bake beans on toast all round - a rolling thunder favourite

(see classic Terrence Hill movie - 'Blazing Saddles')

500N
30th Sep 2013, 19:58
"Also, is Marmite different from Veggiemite?

Yes it is !

If they are SNAG's or families of, Weetbix, Corn Flakes, Toast etc.

If they aren't, as Fantome said, Meat, beans, toast and eggs :ok:

BTW, We aren't that different :O

Worrals in the wilds
30th Sep 2013, 19:58
Eggs and toast is a safe bet. I read that cruise ships travelling to and from a Australia use far more eggs than on other routes. :8 Add some bacon and/or sausages and you'll be fondly remembered.

Don't offer a Dingo's Breakfast; it's slang for no breakfast at all, i.e. 'A quick p*ss and a look around'. ;)

G&T ice n slice
30th Sep 2013, 20:00
I think they throw a gallah on the barbie; or maybe that's supper?

Takan Inchovit
30th Sep 2013, 20:04
Six pack and a ciggie.

500N
30th Sep 2013, 20:09
G&T

That's dinner ! (And you throw a brick on as well,
then after 15 minutes throw away the Galah and
eat the brick) :O


Takan has it correct :ok:
Either a Six pack of beer or a Bottle of Bundy Rum :O

Wholigan
30th Sep 2013, 20:11
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Wholigan/RoastGoanna_zps1faed0f6.jpg

"Well you can live on it, but it tastes like sh1t".

TWT
30th Sep 2013, 20:14
Toast,jam,marmalade.Or what Worrals suggested,but with some fried tomatoes.No need for the Full English.

We used to eat visiting sporting teams for breakfast but that was a long time ago now :{

500N
30th Sep 2013, 20:19
TWT

" We used to eat visiting sporting teams for breakfast but that
was a long time ago now http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/boohoo.gif"

Yes, that was when we used to win things like the Rugby and Cricket :O

blue up
30th Sep 2013, 20:50
Is this not better started in JB?

:rolleyes:

Oh well, it was worth a try.

I think I'll go with what TWT said.:ok:

TWT
30th Sep 2013, 21:06
And forget the Vegemite.No doubt expensive in the UK,you won't like it yourself I'll wager,so a bit wasteful if you have to chuck it out when they leave.

And,people should learn to be omnivorous when travelling abroad.

Fantome
30th Sep 2013, 21:13
"Well you can live on it, but it tastes like sh1t".


"Daddy .. . . this tastes like sh i t!"

"Wanna know something son . .. . ?"

-------------------------------------------------------------

great pic there Wholes . .. . .. . .. old euc fence posts burning well (almost get a whiff) . . . hole dug to shove the lot in later . . . . . . sheets of corrugated over past ashes . . .
stockman's battered boots . . .. . the arm of his ancestors . . . slim dark and handy .. .. . .

ps snake is good if cooked right. maybe lizard too. croc can be scrumptious

but first choice is up the gulf country . . the prawns . . the mud crabs....
ahhhhh. .. . nirvana

Worrals in the wilds
30th Sep 2013, 21:17
And forget the Vegemite.
And definitely the Marmite. ;)
TWT's right; jam, honey, peanut paste or similar will be perfectly acceptable. Lots of Aussies don't actually like Vegemite, so it would be a waste to buy it on spec.

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2013, 21:21
Cold cooked ham and cheese were a bit of a shock at first in Germany (though the sekt was welcome).
Boiled eggs with lumpfish caviar in Denmark and delicious fresh fruit in the Far East.
Full English of course in England and freshly caught haddock in Scotland.

500N
30th Sep 2013, 21:23
Serve them Kippers at least once :O

As TWT said, "And,people should learn to be
omnivorous when travelling abroad."

They might come back with a bit of culture :O
(although some how I doubt it).

TWT
30th Sep 2013, 21:26
Frog porridge in Singapore (but at dinnertime,not breakfast).Although I still preferred Chicken Rice :ok:

Worrals in the wilds
30th Sep 2013, 21:26
That Cantonese chicken rice porridge is surprisingly nice. I got bullied into trying it by a Chinese chef here at a breakfast buffet once, and was glad he had pushed it. :ok:

Andu
30th Sep 2013, 22:58
Anything but Marmite. They'll be polite, but they'll talk about you for generations; that long-lost Pom cousin who served up ***ing Marmite for brekkie.

Seriously? The vast majority of Ozmates these days will be happy with a cereal (preferably a selection; the kids will probably like one laced heavily with sugar) then toast with whatever (jam, Vegemite [yeah!!], marmalade etc).

Bacon 'n' eggs/sausages in most Ozmate households are a special treat when you're 'bunging on side' to impress visitors. The slab of steak and a half dozen eggs is from a time long past for most Ozmates. It might still be the go somewhere waaaay out in the Bush, but I very much doubt it.

mixture
30th Sep 2013, 23:09
blue up,

Seeing as they've pretty much sold out to the Chinese, I suspect they eat whatever the Chinese eat for breakfast these days. :E

500N
30th Sep 2013, 23:30
Mixture

That statement is a bit hypocritical considering the US
outsources all of it's manufacturing to China.


Andu
Bush people and City people still have fry ups :ok:

In fact, I was at Point Cook on the weekend having a coffee
with my GF (earning some credits :O) and the people
either side of us all had a fried breaky except one who
had a big, Turkish Bread bacon sandwich.
One lot were a family of Kiwis, the other side Aussies !!!

Judging by what else was brought out by the waiters,
they were not the only one's.

TWT
30th Sep 2013, 23:37
http://www.picgifs.com/sport-graphics/sport-graphics/fishing/sport-graphics-fishing-074644.gif

VFD
30th Sep 2013, 23:39
And forget the Vegemite.No doubt expensive in the UK,you won't like it yourself I'll wager,so a bit wasteful if you have to chuck it out when they leave
Chuck it out? Probably have to call in the toxic waste disposal squad!

VFD

500N
30th Sep 2013, 23:41
It is known as a WMD by those kids who don't like it :O

TWT
30th Sep 2013, 23:43
You could grease your wheel bearings with it,but the high salt content might be a corrosion starter

rivet head
1st Oct 2013, 00:30
You can always give them a kangaroos breakfast,which consists of a drink of water and a look around

funnelweb
1st Oct 2013, 00:33
A yawn, stretch, a p!ss and good look round.:ok:

onetrack
1st Oct 2013, 00:34
Nothing wrong with Vegemite - just don't make the mistake the Americans do and spread it on an inch thick, like Peanut butter.
Remember Vegemite was invented to make up for the lack of important vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, and the B group vitamins, in many poor Australians diets in the early 1900's.
That's why we're all just such a healthy, good-looking, well-muscled-and-well-proportioned lot, with excellent bones and teeth, nowadays. Just look at Miranda Kerr. I rest my case, M'Lud. :)

"Standard" Aussie breakfast in most cafes is 2 slices of bacon, 2 eggs (poached, fried or scrambled), 2 small "breakfast" sausages, two slices of toast, and either mushrooms or fried tomato (eaters choice).
And good meaty bacon, too - none of this dreadful, fatty, streaky bacon crap. :(

However, the Australian breakfast taste is wide and varied, and many Australians (women in particular) prefer just some cereal with milk, or just yoghurt and fresh fruit.

I rarely eat a full breakfast unless we're having a special brekky get-together with a group of old friends.
Many of the classier cafes/restaurants do Sunday breakfast buffet, all-you-can eat specials, for a very modest set price.
With these breakfast buffets, you get a choice of eggs (fried, poached, scrambled or Hollandaise), bacon, sausages, tomatoes, mushrooms, several types of bread or buns for toast, and coffee, tea, or fresh juices.

My normal breakfast is usually a couple of slices of plain buttered toast and a big cup of tea. However, I do like to have another bite at morning tea time to keep me going.
After all, the Word "breakfast" is supposed to come from "break fast", isn't it? - and you never break a fast with a huge meal, do you?

The "steak-and-eggs-and-everything" breakfast is an outback or rural tradition where one did hard physical work all day long, such as horseback mustering, fencing, or other heavy labouring rural work.
This large breakfast was regularly touted as being needed to keep up your energy levels through the day when doing hard work.
I've done this style of breakfast regularly when I lived and worked in the country - but I was in my 20's and 30's then, and the energy output and energy burn, was a whole lot more than what it is now.

500N
1st Oct 2013, 00:34
A yawn, stretch, a p!ss, a good look round and
then grab a Baby burger :O

tail wheel
1st Oct 2013, 01:59
"Well you can live on it, but it tastes like sh1t".

Actually Wholi, it tastes like chicken!! :)

Hydromet
1st Oct 2013, 02:25
but first choice is up the gulf country . . the prawns . . the mud crabs....
ahhhhh. .. . nirvana...don't forget the Escape River oysters.:ok:

lomapaseo
1st Oct 2013, 02:40
First visit to the UK of my distant relatives since my great Uncle jumped ship from the Royal Navy in 1922. Big family knees-up with about 140+ turning up from Aus, USA, Dubai and all points in between.

Problem is that we are going to be hosting the Aus contingent and will be wanting to give 'em something for breakfast when they arrive. I asked around locally but nobody knows what Aussies eat for breakers.

Any tips?



They're visiting you ... they probably fancy a dig at what you eat for breakfast.

If you try and serve up what you think they eat at home you will probably screw it up.

Serve what you know and look for tips hidden under their tea cups

mikedreamer787
1st Oct 2013, 02:47
To answer the OP's question - for a real no bullshit Oz
brekky anything deemed poofter food, eg 'continental',
'latte' 'croissants' etc should not be served. Vegemite's
ok on one's toast but don't overdo it.

And don't serve any butter, jam etc on those silly tiny
side dishes that never hold enough of what you want.
Leave the jam jar, Vegemite jar and the original butter
container on the table so that everyone can dig in and
extract what they need.

RJM
1st Oct 2013, 04:35
I think Onetrack's on the mark.

Usual, quick breakfast: a couple of slices of toast with butter and in my case, Vegemite. Cup of coffee. Piece of fruit. Some people have a bowl of cereal as well - usually cornflakes, Weet Bix or rice bubbles. Kids eat fancier sugary cereals and have fruit juice instead of coffee. Anxious, dieting women and others with low self-esteem have Special K or muesli.

Proper breakfast, usuaslly reserved for weekends or holidays: bacon and eggs (tomato optional) with toast, and coffee or tea. Cereal optional. Pepper and salt should be on the table, with Worcester sauce with the bacon and eggs.

Vegemite, peanut butter, jam etc is not usually put on the table in little dishes. The manufacturer's jar is fine. Do not serve Marmite.

In winter, some people like porridge instead of cereal.

It's acceptable to read the paper at breakfast, and to complain about bits in it.

Scrambled eggs are served onto individual plates rather than in a common bowl which is placed on the table.

Cereal packets are placed on the table for people to serve themselves, similarly milk cartons and margarine. Butter is served in a butter dish, ie the whole block, not curls etc.

Sweet bakery items like Danishes are not usually eaten at breakfast in Australia, nor are deep-fried items.

Any conversation is ok at breakfast, except probably last night's sex, unless everyone at the table was involved.

Note on Vegemite: Even if your Australian guests don't eat it, they will derive much comfort from seeing it there, and will be impressed by your thoughtfulness.

Buster Hyman
1st Oct 2013, 04:50
Vegemite on toast, but don't buy it. Tell them to bring a jar with them.

Weetabix is close enough to Weetbix, but not as good. It'll do in a pinch though.

Arm out the window
1st Oct 2013, 05:02
If you're having Vegemite, it needs to be on buttered toast. I don't know about other people, but in my book that's what makes it taste bloody good instead of just OK.

500N
1st Oct 2013, 05:03
I agree. Buttered all the way.


Also agree with if they want Vegemite,
they should bring a jar themselves.

Oceanz
1st Oct 2013, 05:06
Note on Vegemite: Even if your Australian guests don't eat it, they will derive much comfort from seeing it there, and will be impressed by your thoughtfulness.Unless they are Promite eaters :}

Buster Hyman
1st Oct 2013, 05:08
Of course, if they travel on QF, Breakfast is the least of their worries...

http://images.theage.com.au/2013/09/27/4783682/Dan-20130927121212541015-300x0.jpg

Worrals in the wilds
1st Oct 2013, 05:39
Any conversation is ok at breakfast, except probably last night's sex, unless everyone at the table was involved.
ROFLMAO. :D

probes
1st Oct 2013, 06:04
They're visiting you ... they probably fancy a dig at what you eat for breakfast.
if I were, I would :).
As for conversation, I prefer not to start any until around noon :zzz:. Unless I absolutely have to.

cattletruck
1st Oct 2013, 06:48
To please your DIY Fairdinkum Aussie contingent at breakfast time you need to set aside a table in smorgasbord style as follows:
Cereals: Big packets of Weet Bix, Coco Pops and Fruit Loops
A large carton or two of milk.
Sugar and bananas.
A couple of loaves of sliced white bread.
A tub or margarine, a tub of jam, a tub of Vegemite, and only one knife (mixing the knifes in each spread is normal)
A toaster.
Percolated coffee.

Flying Binghi
1st Oct 2013, 06:54
Good start is steak and eggs, or bacon and eggs and tomato. ...and coffee of course..:)

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Oct 2013, 07:14
Can't go wrong with a mixed grill. If they prefer the girly-man brekkie, try beans on toast with a couple of fried eggs on top.

mixture
1st Oct 2013, 07:16
500N,

That statement is a bit hypocritical considering the US
outsources all of it's manufacturing to China.

whoooosshhhh......

Yup, the sound of that one going right over your head.

I wasn't referring to Chinese outsourcing, but rather the Australians selling off their mineral rights like there's no tomorrow. Since mineral rights equals large plots of land, the Australians are basically turning large chunks of their country into China. :cool:

It was also somewhat a comment that had a slight element of tongue in cheek and perhaps not intended to be 100% serious,

500N
1st Oct 2013, 07:19
We aren't selling that much of it off. The Gov't wouldn't allow it,
we do have some controls.

We do sell one hell of a lot of the minerals - Iron ore, Coal etc
to them though and make a pretty penny out of it as well.

mikedreamer787
1st Oct 2013, 12:43
There is nothing wrong with Vegemite. Just
don't slather the bloody stuff on your toast.

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ5Ze2AyRR5wjnHya7-30xLlzlyGVgMy5q-6bSrnZ2s-KFyA9y-MA

The above shows the correct dose.

Checkboard
1st Oct 2013, 13:01
In the world of Vegemite, there are "slatherers" and "smearers". :8

I am a slatherer. If you can see the toast, there isn't enough on. :ok:

My wife is a smearer. She takes a tiny bit on a knife, and waves it over the top of buttered toast. Any contact between the two is purely coincidental :hmm:

Despite this almost insurmountable difference, we manage to maintain a Romeo and Juliet marriage, neither mentioning the Vegemite-related embarrassments of the other ... :uhoh:


In terms of breakfast:

A "no added sugar cereal" (Cornflakes, Museli, rice bubbles in a pinch)
Some ice-cold milk for the above.
Some cut fruit (melons, stone fruit or berries are fine)
Toast
Coffee or tea.

I find very few people have the cooking skills of a Wholi to pull off a decent cooked breakfast (and those that do, don't need to ask what to provide).

mikedreamer787
1st Oct 2013, 13:50
I take it Checkers that Reddo allows you the
"breakfast of champions" from time to time? :E

Lightning Mate
1st Oct 2013, 14:30
A proper breakfast anyone ?

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu82/Lightning_29/Full-English-Breakfast-e1347469196699_zpsb133cfde.jpg

teeteringhead
1st Oct 2013, 14:51
try beans on toast with a couple of fried eggs on top. Excellent! But my guilty secret is for the beans to be cold (in temperature) but with lots of Tabasco. Good contrast of taste/temperature/texture.

Must be good bread for the toast - home made or "artisan" - rather than sliced white rubbish.

Normally only have that at weekends, but a late shift tomorrow might just let me indulge then. Mmmmm.

radeng
1st Oct 2013, 15:49
Lightning,

Forget the baked beans but add some fried bread.

I am not keen on baked beans - I cook them about once every 18 months, starting with soaking the dried beans overnight. 10 minutes before serving, I add a 'quant. suff' of dark rum......

There's always porridge followed by kippers - ones that have been smoked, not one dipped in BFK.

500N
1st Oct 2013, 15:53
LM

A black pudding :ok:

It is so hard to get decent, quality Black Pudding over here.

rgbrock1
1st Oct 2013, 16:13
500N wrote:

BTW, We aren't that different

No? Could've fooled me. :}:E:p

500N
1st Oct 2013, 16:16
LOL :ok::O

.............

rgbrock1
1st Oct 2013, 16:17
Lightning Mate:

One look at your "proper" breakfast caused my arteries to begin having seizures. Can you say, clogged arteries? :E:}

rgbrock1's daily breakfast consists of this:

http://www.foodsubs.com/Photos/bread-bagel.jpg

And nothing else. Nothing on the above either: just a plain 'ol bagel.

500N
1st Oct 2013, 16:21
rgb

That's why he is a pilot and you are a GRUNT :O

rgbrock1
1st Oct 2013, 16:25
500N mysteriously wrote:

That's why he is a pilot and you area GRUNT

Perhaps you can enlighten me as to just what an area GRUNT is? Does it entail, perhaps, saturating an enemy-held area with grunts? Or is it a grunt who covers a large area in rapid time?

Inquiring minds want to know. :}:E:p

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Oct 2013, 18:27
LM, are you good with soft furnishings and can name more than four or five colours?


I see no evidence of toast in that pic and those dainty tea cups are an affront to het tigers everywhere. What's wrong with a quart mug of tea and a packed toast rack the size of a deceased mammoth?

500N
1st Oct 2013, 18:34
SRT

You made me look at the photo LM posted.

Are those baked beans in that little cup to the left of the plate ??????


LM - Any comment ?

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Oct 2013, 18:58
Embarrassing, isn't it Mr Nitro.:}

wings folded
1st Oct 2013, 19:04
LM.

Doesn't look too bad as a start.. What about fried bread, heaps of proper toast, fried spuds and one could go on...

wings folded
1st Oct 2013, 19:09
lgbrock,

your breakfast offering looks to me like a comforting appliance for piles sufferers to sit upon, not something to be eaten, especially not upon rising from bed.

See LM's version, as corrected.

500N
1st Oct 2013, 19:16
SRT

Yep, not into "dainty" breakfasts.

And those small Fortnum and Mason marmalade / jams,
annoying to say the least !

rgbrock1
1st Oct 2013, 19:34
Ah stop, 500N. We all know that for breakfast you have
a Cafe' au latte, with chocolate sprinkles on top as well as pink tutu dresses adorning the container. (Of course, we also all know that you drink the same with one of your pinkie fingers
extended in the air.)

:}:}:}

500N
1st Oct 2013, 19:38
RGB

You've outed me :E

Cafe Latte, Lentils and Tofu for lunch :O

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Oct 2013, 19:38
Little umbrella in it too, no doubt.:E

rgbrock1
1st Oct 2013, 19:41
SRT:

Yes, but that little umbrella is being carried by a Girl Scout. (Who are directly related to Australian Special Forces.)

:}:}:}:E:E:E

500N
1st Oct 2013, 19:41
Yep, a pink one :O

And a flower in the Latte froth :O

rgbrock1
1st Oct 2013, 19:43
500N:

A flower? No that's a sprig of fresh mint. It makes your breath minty fresh. Unlike mine which smells like camel shit after a day of smoking and not brushing my teeth! Which I do, of course, upon my return home. Either that or no nook-nook afterwards. :{:{:{

500N
1st Oct 2013, 19:44
RGB

If you forget to clean your teeth, you just turn them over :ok:

radeng
1st Oct 2013, 19:59
rgb

they don't have Girl Scouts in Australia. As in Canada, New Zealand, the UK and many other countries, especially those in the British Commonwealth, they are 'Girl Guides' or just 'Guides'.

Even though they belong to WAGGS, the 'World Association of Girl Guides and girl Scouts'.

mikedreamer787
1st Oct 2013, 21:49
http://www.foodsubs.com/Photos/bread-bagel.jpg

Jesus RGB for a second there I thought you'd posted
a pic of your arsehole! :bored:

500N
1st Oct 2013, 21:58
More like his brain judging by the small size.
Normal for a Ranger !

mikedreamer787
1st Oct 2013, 22:04
Whether his brain or his bunghole
I wouldn't want either for brekky! :eek:

cargosales
1st Oct 2013, 22:23
A proper breakfast anyone ?

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu82/Lightning_29/Full-English-Breakfast-e1347469196699_zpsb133cfde.jpg

Nope, sorry .. that's a fail on the brekkie front.

I love a decent brekkie but what are those dried out & shrivelled objects at the top / right hand side of the plate supposed to be? They kind of resemble bacon but not in a form I'd choose to eat.

It depends on one's taste I suppose but a proper breakfast really needs more than a measly single sausage ..

And where's the fried bread? Ideally two pieces - one to mop up any residue from the non-PC / Health & Safety Police Unapproved still slightly runny fried egg yolks, and one to slather with marmalade and to be enjoyed with one's coffee. :E

Otherwise it looks ok...

CS

G-CPTN
1st Oct 2013, 22:27
We arrived in Denmark and my daughter was (and still is) a lover of Marmite (which we had brought with us).
The son of our landlord asked if he could try this Marmite and he took a spoon and helped himself to a mouthful (thinking it might be like chocolate spread).

He decided that Marmite was not for him . . . :{

John Eacott
2nd Oct 2013, 02:37
I'm intrigued at the number who are adding coffee to the breakfast menu here: almost unheard of amongst my acquaintances, tea being the normal choice. Let's face it, an outback billy is for a handful of tea leaves not the product of a Brazil!

Coffee is for smoko, along with cholesterol rich cream cakes :ok:

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 02:53
John

Interesting observation.

My whole family is English but I am probably the only one who drinks tea
and that is only occasionally.

GF drinks tea.

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 04:54
blue up

I haven't seen mentioned which part of Aus your relatives live in.

This may make a big difference to what they eat for breaky.

Someone in Darwin or Far North Queensland might eat Mangoes
or other fruit in season (cheap and plentiful) where as in Tasmania
(down south), colder, wetter, a more traditional breaky might be
on the cards.

Takan Inchovit
2nd Oct 2013, 05:09
Let's face it, an outback billy is for a handful of tea leaves not the product of a Brazil!

I get my tea and coffee from the plantations of FNQ, and its good.

dubbleyew eight
2nd Oct 2013, 05:20
wally may find all this inane but at least we havent adopted the bloody breakfast of choice of the clueless americans.

who would have thought that the americans start the day with a coffee and six iced wendy's donuts. unbelievable!

just like these...
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRHDp8IzuOJB9ap0I9wB3p4eeU-snvVtewpv9ZevGZOy1pSYI382g

parabellum
2nd Oct 2013, 05:29
Any conversation is ok at breakfast, except probably last night's sex, unless everyone at the table was involved.

'Everyone involved' = Tasmanian breakfast :E

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 05:37
Parabellum

A Tasmanian breaky is a family breaky :O


i wonder if two dads (Green Politician) comes from Tas ? :O

blue up
2nd Oct 2013, 08:36
500N. They are from Perth, about 1/4 mile left of the airfield boundary.

We've got some Laver Bread for them to try. Makes Marmite seem an attractive proposition. :uhoh:

Flying Binghi
2nd Oct 2013, 10:34
Something sweet to follow the bacon and eggs...

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=prmeeo9wbz4

Worrals in the wilds
2nd Oct 2013, 12:29
Someone in Darwin or Far North Queensland might eat Mangoes or other fruit in season (cheap and plentiful)Pee You. :yuk: Where does the bacon go???:E Mangoes are a snack, not a meal. Best consumed over the kitchen sink after being thieved from the neighbour's tree. :suspect:
https://open.abc.net.au/posts/the-best-mango-picking-stick-yet-57wi0qr

I get my tea and coffee from the plantations of FNQ, and its good. Is that from Nerada? Much as I generally support Queensland industry I reckon their tea's a bit average :sad:. I make up for buying the imported stuff by adding an extra spoonful of Qld cane sugar to each cup. :cool::}

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 12:33
Worrals

Always room for Bacon :O

But after a tray of Mangoes, it gets a bit tight !!!

Agree re the Kitchen sink but I have now learnt the Chefs way
of cutting them so they don't leak everywhere and are easy
to eat with a spoon.

That is until you get to the last juicy part, the Pip :O

Worrals in the wilds
2nd Oct 2013, 12:35
The mangoes can wait for morning tea. The bacon can't. :cool:

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2013, 12:45
http://s3.amazonaws.com/bureau-of-trade/p/2012/12/13/sex-breakfast-of-champions-patch-640.jpg

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 12:48
That is before breaky :O

RAC/OPS
2nd Oct 2013, 13:54
500N, if you're ever in the area, Rob's butcher shop in Dandenong does half decent black pudding!

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 13:56
Thanks. I am down there quite a bit.

I'll look him up.

Lonewolf_50
2nd Oct 2013, 16:52
Jesus RGB for a second there I thought you'd posted a pic of your arsehole! :bored:
For that, he'd have had to post a picture of Connecticut's Governor ... :E

@ wings folded:
One standard bagel, split lengthwise, toasted, and then coated in either peanut butter, jam, or cream cheese (with a cup of coffee or tea as desired) makes for an acceptable light breakfast.
Same bagel can be used as a substitute for toast in a more proper breakfast of eggs, bacon, etcetera.

Plazbot
2nd Oct 2013, 17:04
Australians are getting all fancy with steel cut oats and quinoa and shit. Vegemite, bacon and fruit loops will suffice. Maybe a lamb chop and a few sausages too.

Plazbot
2nd Oct 2013, 17:09
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3dqsyXPkG3I

BenThere
2nd Oct 2013, 17:38
I have an in-house Aussie who is the primary breakfast maker in the household.

The singular thing she has done to my breakfast routine is to introduce the cooked tomato to my standard fare. This is something very, very few Americans do.

She really likes American style bacon, thinly sliced and cured. On the other hand I prefer the bacon I'm served in Australia. It's meatier, and has a wider cut, which I like.

She spreads her vegemite thin. I like vegemite, but only once in a while. She has it just about every day. It's an acquired taste, like oysters.

Matari
2nd Oct 2013, 19:04
wally may find all this inane but at least we havent adopted the bloody breakfast of choice of the clueless americans.

who would have thought that the americans start the day with a coffee and six iced wendy's donuts. unbelievable!

Very funny. I once hosted some Norwegian customers to our facility and after a productive few days of meetings I was tasked with bringing them back to the airport for their return flight.

They implored me to find a Dunkin' Donuts so they could buy some donuts on the way to the airport. Fine, I said, to each his own, a donut on the way, why not?

We went inside to order, and each Norwegian (four total) bought a 2-dozen pack of donuts to take back with them. "You're kidding" I said, take these on the plane back to Norway? "Sure, we put them in the overhead bins, and bring them home. The kids love them!" was the commonsense reply.

You won't find the average American wolfing down packs of donuts, but I think W8 kind of knows that. You will find people buying a dozen, bringing them to the office to share in the coffee room, in a neighborly kind of way. Most people may have one, but no more (I stay away, too sugary for me).

But that goes against the all-knowing stereotype, dontcha know.

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Oct 2013, 20:08
500N, not really a standard brekkie but try a chunk of biltong and a handful of dried cling peaches next time you go bush. You can carry rations that'll keep you going for a week in two medium size plastic tubs. Anything else you trap is a bonus.

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 20:15
SRT

Yes, I like Biltong. A guy up there who runs a mine who is ex SA
makes it and brings it down to the camp. Quite a few deer hunters
here in Aus make it, as well as smoked meat and do just that.

I would love to give it a go as I have copious amounts of meat
available (Water Buffalo, some Cow as in moo cow, not cow Buffalo).

I do need to learn to make it. I could chew it all day.

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Oct 2013, 20:31
Loads of recipes on the interthang, Mr Nitro.

You can even get the spices already mixed if you know someone who can bring it in for you.

Freddy Hirsch (http://www.freddyhirsch.co.za/ingredients)

Knew a bloke up the coast from Perth who was contemplating making roo biltong. Never found out how it turned out.

500N
2nd Oct 2013, 20:36
I reckon Roo would be good.

The only problem is, in most states 1. you are not allowed
to shoot them except on permit and 2. You aren't allowed
to take the carcass unless you are a professional shooter.

So getting roo meat back home legally can be a problem.

A bit of a PITA but ways around it.

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Oct 2013, 20:52
Moo cow and buffalo should give you good 'tong as well. Give the boerewors spice a go too. Might need to add a bit of pork fat as buffalo can be a bit dry, but the boerie recipes are definitely worth a try. Dry wors (sausage) is also good for walkabout. Your Saffer mate will be able to whip it up for you if you get the spices. It's kind of addictive too. Easy to nibble on while walking or driving long distances.

The 'tong and dry wors also reconstitutes quite well as a hot meal if you add it to a handful of rice in a billy, along with a stock cube and some dried veg and herbs and a bit of water.

Lonewolf_50
2nd Oct 2013, 21:38
You won't find the average American wolfing down packs of donuts, but I think W8 kind of knows that.
He'd rather lie, it appears.
No worries, we can send him a few Breakfast McMuffins by freight.

Plazbot: Loved the vid. Thanks. :ok:

dubbleyew eight
3rd Oct 2013, 06:16
You won't find the average American wolfing down packs of donuts, but I think W8 kind of knows that.
He'd rather lie, it appears.

bullship! I watched an entire motel full of americans demand their 6 iced donuts for breakfast for the entire week we were there.

americans can be weird outside of walmart.

rgbrock1
3rd Oct 2013, 14:47
Matari wrote:

You won't find the average American wolfing down packs of donuts,

This is true. However, the next time you visit NYC make note of the morning staple of NYC's finest (police.) Coffee and donuts. A box of donuts per squad car!

reynoldsno1
4th Oct 2013, 02:14
You won't find the average American wolfing down packs of donuts,
Some years ago the family overnighted at a Tennessee motel enroute from Michigan to North Carolina. The price included breakfast, which consisted of a very large cardboard box full of doughnuts and an industrial urn of "coffee" on a table at reception.:eek:

BenThere
4th Oct 2013, 03:39
One difference I found shocking when I sat down to breakfast in Australia was that when I asked for more coffee, I got charged for more coffee. In the States, every restaurant I know will continue to refill your coffee until you don't want any more, free.

500N
4th Oct 2013, 03:42
BenThere

Yes, that is one of the major differences between the two countries.

The odd place has percolated coffee where you just refill but not many.


We have better coffee over here :O

Hydromet
4th Oct 2013, 09:42
Has anyone mentioned lamb's fry, bacon and two eggs?

dubbleyew eight
4th Oct 2013, 12:23
Benthere you paid for coffee. so what, it would have been cheaper than those accursed tips.

god tipping is a stupid system.

Matari
4th Oct 2013, 15:11
Hang on, did I read the title of this thread incorrectly?

I thought this was a good, old-fashioned Aussie slagging!

C'mon, haven't we done the "stupid 'murricans and their donuts" to death before? I know I've seen the "Sorry septics and their idiotic tipping" threads at least a dozen times.

A little more than 100 posts into this and we're well onto the Yanks again. Sheesh, you'd think there was nothing else to talk about in the rest of the world.

Just to bring some perspective: the Dutch have this lovely wintertime tradition of "oliebollen"; yes, "oily balls", which is basically fried dough caked in sugar. Mobile olieballen vendors will pull up to train stations and sell these gut-bombs to willing buyers, which provides a welcome bit of warmth in an otherwise dreary Dutch diet.

But get this: you never see an oliebollen outside of Europe or Dutch colonies. Why? It took a Yank to figure out that you can improve the damn things 100% by poking a hole in the middle, so that the lovely crunchiness of fried surface is spread across a larger area. So instead of a clump of half raw dough in the middle (like an oliebol), you get a fully cooked fried surface to chomp down on.

So give the Yanks their due. Today donuts (not oliebollen) can be found everywhere. Like so many things, we take a good idea, improve it, market it, sell it to the rest of the world such that resentful people around the world can get on the Darpa internet (save the Berners-Lee lecture), and bitch and moan to their hearts' content.

500N
4th Oct 2013, 19:36
Hydromet

"Has anyone mentioned lamb's fry, bacon and two eggs?"

I think Lambs Fry is going or has gone out of favour.

Just an observation. Still see it in the shops but not nearly
as much as you used to.

Still love taking the Kidney's, Liver, fresh from an animal
and having it in the pan within a couple of hours. God it
tastes good. A bit of onion in as well.

500N
4th Oct 2013, 19:42
Matari

"'mon, haven't we done the "stupid 'murricans and their donuts" to death before?
I know I've seen the "Sorry septics and their idiotic tipping" threads at least a dozen times."

Come on, are you going to deny those that like Yank bashing
an opportunity to bash you :O ;)

Seriously, cop it on the chin and throw some back twice as hard :ok:

Like you did with the ""oliebollen" into donuts example :O :ok:
"Like so many things, we take a good idea, improve it, market it, sell it to the rest of the world such that resentful people around the world can get on the Darpa internet (save the Berners-Lee lecture), and bitch and moan to their hearts' content."


BTW, all in good fun.

Lonewolf_50
4th Oct 2013, 20:11
bullship! I watched an entire motel full of americans demand their 6 iced donuts for breakfast for the entire week we were there.
Calling BS, W8.
Been round Americans and doughnuts, and the two in the same room, for hundreds of iterations over my life time. Maybe thousands.
The number of times I've ever seen anyone eat more than two or three I can count on one hand. Not buying your fairy tale. (If you are referring to those batches of six minis so often found in vending machines, they you get the disingenuous award, what with the previous reference to full sized).
americans can be weird outside of walmart.
No question of that.
It was an American who coined the following expression:

When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.

I'll offer that he came up with that from observing numerous data points within CONUS.

Hydromet
5th Oct 2013, 00:04
500N
Agree about the offal & onions. When I was working near Forbes, we always made sure to arrive at one particular property on Friday afternoon, when they'd be slaughtering a beast. They'd give us the offal, which they'd otherwise throw out for the dogs. Lamb's fry or bullock's liver, kidneys, heart.

500N
5th Oct 2013, 00:10
Hydromet

Well, this might interest you.

What we call offal, kidneys, liver and maybe heart plus the tongue
is what we tend to eat.

Aboriginies seem to prefer the offal to the meat.

The love the tongue, (almost fight over it to get it :O), love the Stomach of Cows
(I think it's called Tripe by us - I can't stand it but have to get it and wash it
and if you have seen one come out, you wouldn't eat it either :O), and would you believe it,
they love the small intestine as well. Makes me sick just watching them eat it.

Different cultures like different things.

500N
5th Oct 2013, 00:13
If you ever want to endear yourself to Aboriginies,
buy some tongues and take them along with you but
make sure you give them to the Elder of the clan, they
respect the fact you know the culture !!!

mikedreamer787
5th Oct 2013, 00:15
Kidneys, livers, lamb frys....

Jesus mate watch your cholesterol level! :bored:

500N
5th Oct 2013, 00:18
That's what my GF said with my diet, forced me to get a complete check up
at the Doc.

Was she pissed off when all my signs were within normal range :O

mikedreamer787
5th Oct 2013, 00:35
Fair enough mate but still watch it -
while yer not old you're not gettin'
any younger!

I had my epiphany at 50 - forcing me
onto a bloody awful rabbit diet to get
the bad numbers down and me good
numbers up.

The wife still presents me with boring
bloody salads and health shit at least
3 times a week.

500N
5th Oct 2013, 00:41
Mike

Yes, I do try to watch it. When I hook into that stuff, I am generally
do a fair bit of work in 40+ degrees, 80%+ humidity and walking
a fair bit while hunting the animals. And then of course you have
to cut them up and bag them.

I will be watching it more and more in the future, am trying to
get my weight down by 20kgs although that should be interesting :O

Hydromet
5th Oct 2013, 01:27
Jesus mate watch your cholesterol level! No need to, my GP does that.:=

However, offal is a rare treat now, as my father had his first heart attack at 43 and his last at 50. Also, the wife refuses to have anything to do with liver & kidneys, apart from buying me the occasional steak & kidney pie, so I only get to cook them when she's away. Fortunately, my local butcher still stocks lambs fry, brains and kidneys.

BenThere
5th Oct 2013, 01:41
No knowledge of how it's done elsewhere, but in the US if you buy a whole, cleaned and plucked chicken at the grocery store, inside the cavity will be a bag containing the heart, liver, gizzard and neck bone. That's my favorite part, consumed as an appetizer. The neck bone goes to the dog, who relishes it as well.

As for tipping, it is a hidden cost. Somehow, the standard of 15% has given way to a standard of 20%. Not for the van driver who picks up the crew at the airport and takes them to the hotel, though. His tip is $1 and has been for 50 years.

Also, at the bar, where you order two beers, the tip is $1, no percentages applied.

Wxgeek
5th Oct 2013, 02:46
Not for the van driver who picks up the crew at the airport and takes them to the hotel, though. His tip is $1 and has been for 50 years.

Except for Japan, no tip required or expected and the service is the best.

BenThere
5th Oct 2013, 02:57
And in Seoul, too.

I always enjoyed tipping the driver, who was there waiting for us every time, wearing white gloves and showing the utmost diligence, hustle, and respect to us as his customers. The theatrics he went through thanking us tippers were as if we had given him a new car on his wedding day. Deep bows, profuse gratitude, etc. One time, I gave him another dollar just to see the whole show again.

bosnich71
5th Oct 2013, 06:02
I once carried a suitcase from a corporate aircraft to the limousine,as one does when one has VIP pax arriving, nothing out of the ordinary. The bloke whose bag it was handed me a tip, something I'd never received before ... this being in Australia where everyone is equal, except in the salary department of course. I stuck the note in my pocket and thought fair enough he's shouted me a beer. When I arrived home I found that it was a $100 bill, American ! And in those days it was pre Obama and worth about 120 Australian FFS.
I found out later that the client was on a world tour of gambling establishments and, according to the aircrew, was about $16 million down at that moment. Serves the silly bugger right if he was going about giving 100 dollar tips away to every flunky he ran across. :=

Worrals in the wilds
5th Oct 2013, 09:49
Lamb's fry or bullock's liver, kidneys, heart.
Peeyuke! :yuk:
It all tastes so much better when whipped into a So-and So's 'Famous' (for all the wrong reasons :uhoh:) meat pie. :E:}
No knowledge of how it's done elsewhere, but in the US if you buy a whole, cleaned and plucked chicken at the grocery store, inside the cavity will be a bag containing the heart, liver, gizzard and neck bone
Over the years I've read a number of 'cook your Christmas turkey' articles in women's magazines that stress; remove the bag of giblets BEFORE cooking your turkey. It's also written on the bag in big bold print (by Ingham's poultry at any rate) though many a young Christmas hostess has learned this the hard way. :ouch:

Chooks don't usually come with giblets in Australia any more, because the major retailers have learned they can sell them separately for five bucks a kilo. Likewise lamb shanks, osso bucco, soup bones and all the other stuff butchers used to give away if you smiled sweetly and bought some snags. :sad: I blame the TV cooking shows...:}

Lon More
5th Oct 2013, 10:16
I'll eat anything if it's served up properly. Does this lady (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/524952-best-man-left-bleeding.html) do sausages?

Saratogapp
5th Oct 2013, 11:52
Depending on the season, porridge can be quite acceptable, too followed by your toast.

mikedreamer787
5th Oct 2013, 15:00
I blame the TV cooking shows...

Dunno about you Worrals but I like TV cooking shows! :)

R9ttQEQH9bY

flying lid
5th Oct 2013, 16:37
http://getmetoadelaide.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/pie-floater.jpg

Lon More
5th Oct 2013, 17:38
you might leave a couple of floaters in the pan after one of those.

TWT
5th Oct 2013, 21:25
Not much different to fish and mushy peas.You need to have consumed at least 5 pints to eat either of them.

radeng
5th Oct 2013, 21:48
The last few American hotels I've been in, the nationals always seem to be on decaff coffee, fruit, and about one piece of dry toast. Bacon left (but on the other hand, with American bacon, who would blame them?) and they have the low cholesterol eggs.

Plus they all seem to go jogging or working out......healthy lot they must be.

Must be the nightmare of the people figuring on how long they are going to be paying social security and the annuity payers.........

Worrals in the wilds
6th Oct 2013, 04:14
Dunno about you Worrals but I like TV cooking shows!
Very much so, but they love using unusual meats and/or cuts, which mysteriously triple in price at the supermarket the following day... Certainly I think they've brought about the recent offal revival in Australia.

Lonewolf_50
7th Oct 2013, 15:18
Mike, thanks for the cooking video. Guilty pleasure. I had to laugh.

500N
7th Oct 2013, 15:21
To the OP

Let us know how you go on and how close or wide of the mark we are :O

Pelikal
7th Oct 2013, 15:25
Oh for heavens' sake, just serve it upside down.:ugh:

blue up
7th Oct 2013, 18:54
News.

Uncle Trefor and Aunty Grace wos great fun. They used an obscenity every third word (My kids were taking notes) and they consumed the Veggiemite and the Chocolate Croissants. Turns out they were both in the Aus Navy and have had to reduce their Profanity quotient drastically since they F****n' left the F****in' Navy to live the B***rd easy life amongst the F****in' peasants. Sh*******t, how things are different in the UK!

Next stop is to visit the olde family stomping grounds near Ponty and Anglesey.

We've discovered that a 'Lolloy' is anything sweet that kids eat, Shoite, is anything containing Couscous or Lettuce and 'Solroite' is anything deemed acceptable.

One major thing we have in common is that we have the same opinion of New Zealanders. :ok:

500N
7th Oct 2013, 19:06
Good to hear the visit went well :O :ok:

Solid Rust Twotter
7th Oct 2013, 19:06
One major thing we have in common is that we have the same opinion of New Zealanders.


Got your arse kicked at the rugger as well, eh?

500N
7th Oct 2013, 19:23
That applies to everyone.

Checkboard
7th Oct 2013, 19:26
They used an obscenity every third word (My kids were taking notes)
Ahh ... Australia - the only place in the world where it is impossible to diagnose Tourette's syndrome :D

500N
7th Oct 2013, 19:36
Checkboard

That is gold :ok: :D

Worrals in the wilds
7th Oct 2013, 20:33
They used an obscenity every third word (My kids were taking notes)
Which you'd be quite used to after communicating with all of us on here. :E:} Glad the visit went well and you're all having a nice time.
Shoite, is anything containing Couscous or Lettuce
Also known as Wog Food. I eat a lot of Wog Food and am the constant butt of good natured workplace jokes about it. The positive side is that no-one ever nicks my lunch.

Cute, Checkboard. :ok:

G&T ice n slice
7th Oct 2013, 21:28
Re the Pie Floater

What the heck is the difference between "with pie" and "with flavoured pie"

AND PLEASE.... tell me that those photographs are a joke on us ignorant Brits..

500N
7th Oct 2013, 21:30
G&T

Don't worry, I have yet to work out what a Pie Floater is :rolleyes:

Never heard of it before.

Anyway, if that is "food" in the photo, you can have it.

500N
7th Oct 2013, 21:34
OK, I just looked it up.

Firstly, Adelaide and Sydney,well, that says it all. No culture in those places :O

"bowl of thick green pea soup"
Now I know why I wouldn't eat it.

"The pie floater is an Australian dish particularly common in Adelaide and, to a lesser degree, Sydney. It commonly consists of a traditional Australian-style meat pie, usually sitting, but sometimes submerged (sometimes upside down) in a bowl of thick green pea soup"

G-CPTN
7th Oct 2013, 21:44
" the pie floater was recognized as a South Australian Heritage Icon by the National Trust of Australia." :ugh:

Pappa Smurf
7th Oct 2013, 22:24
[email protected],
Normal pie is a beef pie.
Flavoured pies include,curry,steak and kidney,potato,chicken.

RJM
8th Oct 2013, 01:09
We've done pie floaters haven't we?

In any case, I'm in Adelaide, South Australia - the epicentre of the (slowly) spreading lust for the delight that is the floater.

The definitive floater was invented by and only sold at the three pie carts that until the late 1980s operated in Adelaide after midninght, and which in earlier days were the only vendors of food open after midnight.

The true floater consists of a square (round acceptable) meat pie served upside down in a shallow dish of green pea soup, served in a proper thick glazed soup bowl.

There is only one type of floater, and it's as described. It is ordered with the words 'Floater, thanks', often the only words in the entire transaction.

Requested variations, such as a 'pasty floater', 'right way up please' or 'not too much soup' are dead set indications that you are a member of the gay community, or from Victoria. In either case, you'll find the other diners moving away from you.

The floater is never eaten seated. If there is room at the pie cart's counter, you may eat it there, otherwise you should stand and eat it while holding the plate. The last is no mean feat, especially as floater eaters are very often drunk.

Two condiments would be expected on the counter, for self-serving by the customer: a bottle of vinegar and a squeeze bottle of tomato sauce with an pointed nozzle. Sauce may be injected into the overturned pie with this nozzle, or sauce may be dribbled over the pie. There's a limit to how much sauce can be put in or on one floater. Australia is egalitarian, and the protocol of a 'reasonable amount' should not be exceeded, to ensure that there is enough for all. There is even a common phrase relating to excessive personal use of a resource: 'Fair suck of the sauce bottle, mate.'

Sadly, extended trading hours and OHS requirements have achieved whjat decades of unfavourable council health inspections couldn't, and all of the pie carts have closed.

A few restaurants and trendy pubs have tried to sell wan imitations of real pie floaters, offering flavoured pies and making fancy patterns on the pie with the sauce.

Naturally, connoisseurs have no truck with this sort of thing, and to most, the floater has become a treasured memory, to be revived occasionally at home with the production of floaters in the strict traditional manner, preceded ideally by the lashings of alcohol that are essential to the enjoyment of the meal.

As a matter of interest, I was on the National Trust committee which put up the pie floater for heritage listing. The idea was to gain publicity for the National Trust as much as for anything else.

TWT
8th Oct 2013, 01:23
RJM,

There's still Harry's Cafe de Wheels in Sydney

Harry's Cafe de Wheels - Famous for Pies and Peas, Meat Pies, Hot Dogs in Woolloomoloo (http://www.harryscafedewheels.com.au/)

However,they only do pies with mushy peas and not floaters.And their menu is far too extensive,no doubt to cater for all the trendies.

500N
8th Oct 2013, 01:31
RJM

Thank you for that. Very interesting. Our culture doesn't extend to
the level of a pie floater.

Victoria (Melbourne) has had for many years "Hot Dog vans" outside of the
nightclub venues. Average at best but soaks up the alcohol.

The alternative which is often very good, a Kebab or Souvlaki from Lygon Street in Carlton. Lygon Street of course being the cultural eating centre of Melbourne.

RJM
8th Oct 2013, 01:50
You left out the Australian preliminary f*cken, blue up, as in

'F*cken' it's f*cken' hot this after-****en'-noon. F*cken' where's my f*cken' beer?

onetrack
8th Oct 2013, 02:23
Fortunately, the pie floater never made it to the Western end of the Australian continent, where culinary tastes have never deteriorated to the level of Adelaide and Sydney.

I understand some local yacht builders imported a sizeable amount of pie floaters from "over East" and used them instead of lead in the keels of yachts being built. They were much cheaper than lead, and about the same S.G. :)

They were also much more safe from theft than lead, as thieves wouldn't even give a floater a second glance, when it came to nicking stuff.

500N
8th Oct 2013, 02:30
I have a sneaking suspicion the the term Pie Floater gave rise
to another type if "F" ;)

Solid Rust Twotter
8th Oct 2013, 06:30
I'm surprised some enterprising Saffer immigrant hasn't yet introduced the epitome of post piss-up scoff. Like the floater, ordering one is simplicity itself. "Bunny please" is all that needs to be said, and in a few seconds a piping hot Bunny Chow will be delivered to another drooling customer. Drool may be due to state of inebriation or in anticipation of the bunny.

Bunny Chow consists of a half loaf of white bread (although it is acceptable for the ladies in the group to order a quarter bunny) with the guts ripped out, filled with a ladle of curry, a scoop of sambal and then plugged with the handful of bread ripped out to form the receptacle. Sambals may be chopped tomato and onion with coriander, shredded carrot with turmeric or cucumber in yoghurt, all depending what the vendor has available.

If you make it home and you're not wearing a large portion of the bunny on your chest, you're a moffie and didn't get near enough beer in you.

Some upper class establishments have gone the healthy route and offer a wholegrain loaf bunny, along with a choice of curries. They are to be avoided in case one catches something nasty involving soft furnishings and a dislike of rugby in the manner of the trendy right way round floater purchasers.

gileraguy
8th Oct 2013, 09:03
And Pie Floaters taste awesome when (and only when) you're rat arse pissed!

The next day the pea soup really clean out your pipes!

G&T ice n slice
8th Oct 2013, 09:15
Normal pie is a beef pie.
Flavoured pies include,curry,steak and kidney,potato,chicken.

you know, I'm not sure that improves things or not....

Hydromet
8th Oct 2013, 09:30
Normal pie is a beef pie.
Flavoured pies include,curry,steak and kidney,potato,chicken.Don't forget the Ned Kelly - minced beef, mashed potato, egg & tomato.

onetrack
8th Oct 2013, 09:48
"Commercially produced" Australian pies are not particularly rewarding. The pastry is usually too heavy and the contents are often somewhat mysterious, with "plasma" often listed as an ingredient. :(

However ... when you find an eatery making its own gourmet pies, in-house - you generally find a very acceptable product.
We have a local favorite little cafe that not only does good breakfasts - it does its own excellent gourmet pies.

The Dizzy Witch Cafe Menu - Perth, WA - Foodspotting (http://www.foodspotting.com/places/299039-the-dizzy-witch-cafe-perth)

The pie varieties vary from week to week - however, here's a typical sample ..

Spicy Beans
Beef Stroganoff
Chicken & Bacon
Chilli Beef & Cheese
Lamb and Rosemary
Lamb, Mint & Pea
Lamb Curry
Steak & Kidney

The place is very popular and nearly always packed, thus indicating that their food is appreciated, and in substantial demand.

500N
8th Oct 2013, 09:59
They are missing 'Roo pie !

I made a mean 'Roo pie once, one of the only one's I have ever done
but it was delicious. Lashings of gravy :ok:

Lightning Mate
8th Oct 2013, 10:01
Oi 500 - get back to the other thread.

500N
8th Oct 2013, 10:03
Roger, getting back in formation now :O

G-CPTN
8th Oct 2013, 10:08
WRT the 'bunny', when I was a secondary school, the seniors would climb out over the wall at morning break time and head for the adjacent corner shop - initially just for chocolate, sweets and crisps (potato chips), but as these visits coincided with the arrival of freshly-baked (and still hot) loaves of bread, some ventured into buying a small loaf - which in turn developed into the habit of ripping out the soft interior and then replacing this (after consuming the contents) with a bag of crushed crisps.
The shopkeeper quickly responded by offering half-loaves cut open ready to receive the crushed bag of crisps, greatly increasing his turnover of bread.

RJM
8th Oct 2013, 10:37
Harry's Cafe de Wheels - Famous for Pies and Peas, Meat Pies, Hot Dogs in Woolloomoloo

Sounds like a bit of a generalist, with respect TWT. Not quite 'playing for both sides' with that selection, if you get my drift, but coming pretty close.

As for your fancy Perth pie shop, one track, all I can say is that isolation seems to bring out the extreme in some people. Fortunately, isolation is also insulation, so live and let live, I suppose.

SRT, your evocative description of a Bunny Chow almost brought tears to my eyes. A meal fit for heroes. Perhaps, in another life, the pie floater and the Bunny Chow could have formed the robust basis of an entire national cuisine!

While the true pie floater may have struggled against the kebab and the 24 hour McDonald's, the Bunny Chow carries the flag for Real Food.

G-CPTN
8th Oct 2013, 11:17
Bunny Chow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunny_chow).

TWT
8th Oct 2013, 12:09
Agree RJM,as I am from the same neck of the woods as you.Had a few floaters in Victoria Square in my youth.
nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
mmmmmmmmmmmm
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
mmmmmmmmmm

Lonewolf_50
8th Oct 2013, 13:16
RJM and SRT: many thanks for explaining the cuisine details foreign to my own self. Makes me want to pour down too much beer and go seeking such a glorious finisher ... but we won't get those round here.

Our choices tend to be the local taquerias where a burrito filled with goodness knows what is the only substitute, which leaves one wondering what sauce would properly go on the burrito to approximate such a pie.

Not likely to be one. Some things don't translate well.

Matari
8th Oct 2013, 14:31
C'mon Lonewolf, no self-respecting Texican would ever order a burrito in a strip-mall taqueria (the best kind). I don't even think they have 'em on the menu.

No, the only thing to order there, which rivals any street food anywhere in the world for wholesome greasy goodness, is tacos al pastor con tortillas de maize, cilantro y cebolla. Nada mas, nada menos.

MagnusP
8th Oct 2013, 14:45
Is a beef chimichanga and refried beans not a distant relation of the pie floater?

G&T ice n slice
8th Oct 2013, 20:06
refried beans

I put it into wiki-thingya

I read with interest and found there was a link via "chimichanga"

I read with interest and found a link via "chingada"

Wow, have I got a bunch of reading to do... my how useful & interesting

Solid Rust Twotter
9th Oct 2013, 05:38
Alongside a cold bunny, that there chimichanga stuff does sound like a fine way to occupy one's fangs of a morning.:ok:


Like steak for breakfast, it's a man thing. The ladies wouldn't understand...

Worrals in the wilds
9th Oct 2013, 07:40
Those bunny chows look awesome.
I'll have to try making one. :ok:

MagnusP
9th Oct 2013, 08:43
my how useful & interesting

Sorry, G&T, I've probably broken a JB ROE if that's the case. :p

Solid Rust Twotter
9th Oct 2013, 12:34
Even your bog standard mince and veg curry makes a fine bunny, Ms Worrals. Mme BD sampled the delight in Durbs on her SA trip a couple of years back, and found it quite palatable. It's something that could take off in Oz if one were to convince the bloke who runs the pie van to give it a go.

Plenty of sambals around, but grated carrot, chopped onion and a little chili works fine.

G&T ice n slice
9th Oct 2013, 16:35
Now that the hangover has subsided, (an ale called "Old Tom" comes in small bottles and you have to drink several to cure thirst) I have to admit that late last night I manged to pprune and you know those pie floters looked truly appetising!

Lonewolf_50
9th Oct 2013, 19:22
C'mon Lonewolf, no self-respecting Texican would ever order a burrito in a strip-mall taqueria (the best kind). I don't even think they have 'em on the menu.
Yes, they do.
It's a larger tortilla (flour or corn) than the usual taco, which one can have filled with a variety of stuff. Typically what's inside includes frijoles, some sort of meat, some kind of peppers, and some sort of sauce. Depends on the house specialty. (One can go yuppie and hit a Freebird's Burrito, but it just ain't the same).
tacos al pastor con tortillas de maize, cilantro y cebolla. Nada mas, nada menos.
You can get all that in a burrito 'round here. It's like the taco, just larger. By the way, hold that useless cilantro crap. Put the local salsa verde on it. Much better. Also, make sure they squirt some fresh lime juice (only Rio Grande Valley limes will do) on the pastor before rolling it all up.
Yum.

Taqueria Jalisco

They make a fine burrito al Pastor! :ok:

RJM
10th Oct 2013, 00:58
This is making me hungry!!