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cattletruck
23rd Sep 2013, 13:04
What was your first pocket electronic calculator you spelt the word ShELLOIL on?

http://www.vintage-technology.info/pages/calculators/casio/casioh813.jpg

dubbleyew eight
23rd Sep 2013, 13:07
my first calculator was a HP35 that cost me near on a month's wages.
I still have it but we spelled out ShELL OIL on it not oil well.

http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y421/dubbleyew8/HP_35_Calculator_zps35c35e6e.jpg

I still use the manuals dodge of 113 divided into 355 for an approximation of pi.

Lon More
23rd Sep 2013, 13:11
Can't remember the model, but it was an HP, and it spelled out ESSO OIL (7100553) when viewed inverted. You couldn't do that with a slipstick.

Alloa Akbar
23rd Sep 2013, 13:12
My casio was my first one.. "hellish" and "Shelloil" were another two.. :ok:

G-CPTN
23rd Sep 2013, 13:23
I had (and still have - somewhere) an original Sinclair Cambridge.

mixture
23rd Sep 2013, 13:27
cattletruck tut tut....:=

This is JetBlast..... surely we should be entering 5318008 onto our calcuators. :E

parabellum
23rd Sep 2013, 13:28
Way, way back, company requirement, if using a calculator,
insert: 98765432 multiply by .09, should give all the eights and verify each diode was working.

compressor stall
23rd Sep 2013, 13:30
Mixture, It was 55378008 when I grew up:ok:

cattletruck
23rd Sep 2013, 13:34
surely we should be entering 5318008 onto our calcuators

First time I heard of that one mixture, I'm being serious :8.

MagnusP
23rd Sep 2013, 14:01
Ah yes, 5318008. I believe that was the catalogue number of the famous painting by Van Klomp. It now hangs on the walls of Longleat, home to the Marquess of Bath.

Culture on a Monday, eh? Pretty impressive, I'd say.

gruntie
23rd Sep 2013, 14:03
When the first calculators appeared with a square root key, trying to find the square root of 1 fried their brains, until the manufacturers realised and changed the programming.
The local schoolkids found this out and used to go into Dixons and destroy all the calculators on display by entering this simple calculation, and then scarper before their crime was discovered.

Loose rivets
23rd Sep 2013, 14:31
Me, from 2006. Still cringe at my unawareness.:uhoh:

Another anecdote I have been too embarrassed to tell about till this stage of me life.
I put together a Sinclair Scientific kit for a pilot mate. I really really took such care with each joint. When I finally clicked the case shut and turned it on, the screen looked odd. A simple sum and it looked even odder. After some time I sent it back to ‘support'. A week later I got a letter saying that there was nothing wrong with it and they have taken the unusual step of ensuring that I got the one I did because of the ‘beautiful workmanship.' I glowed with pride, but not for long, the computer still showed bo11ox. Then it dawned on me. ‘Scientific' it was made to show this notation only. Doa!!!!!!

dazdaz1
23rd Sep 2013, 14:36
I got 'leslie' > 735713 read upside down, right to left.

Daz

MagnusP
23rd Sep 2013, 15:02
Further to my comments about Van Klomp, I present to you "The Fallen Madonna with the Big 5318008".

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c2/FallenMadonna.jpg

cattletruck
23rd Sep 2013, 15:14
MagnusP, that's priceless.

Makes you wonder where they've pinned 55378008.

vulcanised
23rd Sep 2013, 15:17
Still got a 1970s Commodore mains powered calculator, still works.

Capetonian
23rd Sep 2013, 15:31
I was in charge of an airline ticketing office and all fares other than straight o/w and r/t were calculated manually, in FCUs (= 1USD, now called a NUC) with mileage surcharges, currency adjustments, HIPs, and so on ..... all worked out on this :




http://img.gawkerassets.com/post/4/2012/12/1973_sinclair_cambridge_calculator.jpg

radeng
23rd Sep 2013, 22:44
Back in 1986, my personal HP35 failed. I asked my boss for an HP41, and he refused. Two days later, we went into a meeting with a customer, and in the technical discussion., I started using my slide rule.....
This caused so much embarrassment in front of a customer AND marketing that he signed off for me to have an HP41C.

I'm still using it........bloody good calculator.....

oh, yes, that was another of my managers who got made redundant, although there were about 17 more who did...

ExSp33db1rd
23rd Sep 2013, 23:41
Insert: 98765432 multiply by .09, should give all the eights and verify each diode was working.
100 divide by 81 = 12345679

OK - you miss the 8

Tankertrashnav
24th Sep 2013, 00:06
Back in 1986, my personal HP35 failed. I asked my boss for an HP41, and he refused. Two days later, we went into a meeting with a customer, and in the technical discussion., I started using my slide rule.....
This caused so much embarrassment in front of a customer AND marketing that he signed off for me to have an HP41C.


Today that would cause only mystification and questions about what the little stick thingy you were holding was!

dubbleyew eight
24th Sep 2013, 01:32
my HP35 was used for surveying computation. the local alternative was a Realtone algebraic calculator. on one of my courses everyone poo poo'd the cost of the HP and bought the much cheaper real tones.

by course end my HP35 was still ticking along happily. all the other guys had spent more replacing dud calculators. they just wore them out. the count was 3 or 4 replacements each.

HP calculators were good for one extra digit of precision. much later I found out their secret. they calculate in binary coded decimals.

about 1980 my HP35 lost a digit so I replaced it with a HP11c. my 11c still looks like new and shows no indication of the amazing amount of use it has had.

Like many I beat on HP's head to make a new calculator in the same style.
sadly HP is not the company it once was and the HP16 they came up with has errors in its logic.
the odd thing is that HP never exerted copyright on its calculator designs.

following on from the stuffup with their HP16 a swiss chap has reengineered the entire HP11, 12, 15, 16 range in a credit card sized format.
the display is the same size as the original but the spaces between the keys has been squished. his calculators are believed to be logic error free.
SwissMicros.com (http://www.swissmicros.com)
if you are interested.

West Coast
24th Sep 2013, 02:54
Dubble

About what year is the calculator in your original post?

dubbleyew eight
24th Sep 2013, 03:03
I bought my calculator (HP35) in 1973. It was one of the singapore made ones with the code mods. never ever saw an error with mine so the mods fixed the problems.

I just took this photo.
http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y421/dubbleyew8/DSCN0109_zpsdd4cc059.jpg
I'm sure hand soldered and assembled. numbers right through the key so they couldnt wear off.
instruction manual, protective case, leather protective bag, charger. the bees knees at the time.

the rechargeable battery of course has long since corroded and been trashed.

Buster Hyman
24th Sep 2013, 03:03
Hours of fun with this one Magnus...

http://forums.watchuseek.com/attachments/f17/1193812d1376840288-why-isnt-there-656201d1332122677-what-best-watch-world-casio-calculator-watch-544px.jpg

And, I still have the watch!

ricardian
24th Sep 2013, 04:55
Tankertrashnav said Today that would cause only mystification and questions about what the little stick thingy you were holding was!
We always referred to the slide rule as a Guessing Stick

alisoncc
24th Sep 2013, 07:17
Ah, but was it a six inch or a twelve inch. A six inch guessing stick in the top pocket of a white dust coat meant you were allowed inside the computor.

Mid seventies used to demo these for Tektronix.

http://www.oldcalculatormuseum.com/a-tek31.jpg


.

Arm out the window
24th Sep 2013, 09:44
This was the hilarious calculator trick at our school:

A girl has a 69 inch bust and wants it reduced (enter the digits 69 on the calculator).

She goes to the doctor who gives her some pills and says "Take two of these, two times a day for two weeks." (enter the digits 222)

She comes back but her boobs are still too big, 51 inches (enter 51).

The doctor says "Go and do the same thing for 8 weeks" (multiply by 8)

... and when she came back she was ...

(turn calculator upside down).

Tee hee, much schoolboy giggling

Hydromet
24th Sep 2013, 10:54
Can't remember my first calculator, but I remember having to write tender documents to buy a single 13 digit, 4 function, nixie cube display calculator for work.

Remember doing pages of spherical trig calcs using 7 figure trig tables. The calcs were relatively simple once you knew how to do them - the paper was all taken up by the numbers.

dubbleyew eight
24th Sep 2013, 11:01
Chamber's Seven Figure Mathematical Tables.

one of the guys wrote a program to generate the tables then went through the output comparing with Chamber's figures.
there are areas where chambers is wrong, probably through transcription errors ...nobody using them ever noticed.

teeteringhead
24th Sep 2013, 11:03
My first was the Sinclair Cambridge too.

I remember when I brought it home, Milady Teeters response was:

"Oh - that looks very good ........ how accurate is it??"

And she isn't blonde!

ExXB
24th Sep 2013, 11:44
I was in charge of an airline ticketing office and all fares other than straight o/w and r/t were calculated manually, in FCUs (= 1USD, now called a NUC) with mileage surcharges, currency adjustments, HIPs, and so on ..... all worked out on this

Hate to be a pedant, Capetonian but an FCU equalled a USD only in some cases, such as travel within the W. Hemisphere (TC1). For transatlantic a FCU was surcharged 6% to equal a dollar. A NUC (neutral unit of currency) is a dollar., it's just not called that for political reasons.

Hydromet
24th Sep 2013, 12:11
W8
my HP35 was used for surveying computation.Bit of a step up from the Curta?

dubbleyew eight
24th Sep 2013, 12:56
the curta was an amazing piece of gear. I was handed one to use in an exam.
having never seen one before it was a bit of a puzzle.
when a screw came loose inside and it locked up I reverted to chambers.
immediate fail.
ds checked my answer. correct answer, used chambers, still fail.

the other gem was the brunsviga. ours were all brass because all the paint had been worn off in use.

actually the gem of all calculators when you could coax it to work was the huge
electric drive Friden. all workings to 15 digits.

I am eternally glad of my reverse polish notation HP11c. the past may sound wonderful but in reality it was tedious beyond belief.

Hydromet
24th Sep 2013, 13:18
Yep, Friden were good, better than their cousin, the Marchant. Had one at work once that started running noisily, so old mate sprayed WD40 into it while it was running. Flash, smoke, but it got rid of the noise.

Saw a Brunsviga when studying, but never used one, other than an adding machine in the army.

GrumpyOldFart
24th Sep 2013, 13:38
All you ever wanted to know about calculators. (http://www.vintagecalculators.com/index.html)



:8

ExSp33db1rd
25th Sep 2013, 00:51
Hours of fun with this one Magnus...

http://forums.watchuseek.com/attachm...atch-544px.jpg (http://forums.watchuseek.com/attachments/f17/1193812d1376840288-why-isnt-there-656201d1332122677-what-best-watch-world-casio-calculator-watch-544px.jpg)

And, I still have the watch!

I have almost the same watch, but just had to put on my 3rd strap - which cost twice as much as I paid for the watch in Bangkok in 1987.

Daylight robbery.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
25th Sep 2013, 01:45
Mine was the last 3rd year class (1976) to be issued with slide rules. Assorted rich buggers had HP35s and Sinclairs by 'O' Level time.

Both our female maths teachers got us boys very interested in the number 58008618 . I ended up doing Double Maths to 'S' Level.