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probes
18th Sep 2013, 18:35
just last week a friend told about a really drunk bloke sitting behind her, getting more and more noisier and having more and more trouble with balance and when the flight attendant was about to have to seriously decide what to do, the man sitting next to her punched the bloke - bringing peace and quiet to all.
But that's not the worst that can happen, it appears:
Drunk Scots heading to Ibiza got so drunk they thought they had arrived at destination when plane touched down at Paris so they could be arrested | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2424473/Drunk-Scots-heading-Ibiza-got-drunk-thought-arrived-destination-plane-touched-Paris-arrested.html)
So, how often are there real troublemakers, I wonder?

tony draper
18th Sep 2013, 18:52
They could stop selling drink on the Aircraft or in the Airport.:)

rgbrock1
18th Sep 2013, 19:04
probes:

As in life outside the confines of an aircraft, there are "trouble makers" everywhere. It just seems that said confines brings out the "best" in those with attitudes needing adjustment.

I was on an aircraft not too long ago when an obviously drunk and belligerent passenger (male) decided to become extremely obnoxious in his behavior, and mouth, toward my wife. Which made her extremely uncomfortable. And made me extremely irate. Until the point when my wife became rather upset. And, in my book anyway, one who causes my wife to become upset faces the consequences of his actions.

Which the aforementioned obnoxious and belligerent passenger did. (My fist seemed to take on a life of its own and like a radar guided missile homed in on his face. I tried to explain this phenomena to the cabin crew member who witnessed the radar-guided fist but she would have no part of it but thanked me profusely.)

probes
18th Sep 2013, 19:19
there are "trouble makers" everywhere
sure, just the options for solving the problem are limited? I mean, obviously it's hard to talk some sense into someone who has none.

rgbrock1
18th Sep 2013, 19:23
probes:

For those incapable of receiving sense then one should do as Mitch Rapp did and knock some sense into them, no?!!!!

Loose rivets
18th Sep 2013, 20:08
(My fist seemed to take on a life of its own and like a radar guided missile homed in on his face.

Exactly this happened to me with the school bully. I felt my left hand leave my side and next minute he was reeling across the playground.

rgbrock1
18th Sep 2013, 20:15
Loose wrote:

Exactly this happened to me with the school bully. I felt my left hand leave my side and next minute he was reeling across the playground.

Amazing phenomena isn't loose? Truly one of life's many enigmas! :}:}:}

500N
18th Sep 2013, 20:19
Loose

Same thing happened here, school bully except I was in a lunch queue.
He said one thing too many and the next minute his legs collapsed
from under him and he was lying on the ground bleeding :rolleyes:

it was like God had sent a bolt from the sky that knocked him down
- much to the amusement of virtually everyone else in the line !

You get some real doozies on aircraft, even more so when alcohol used
to be available for free - ie 747's on flights from the UK to Aus.

con-pilot
18th Sep 2013, 20:35
For those incapable of receiving sense then one should do as Mitch Rapp did and knock some sense into them, no?!!!!

No more Mitch Rapp books. :{:{:{

All we got left is Jack NMI Reacher. Which isn't all that bad, but...

West Coast
18th Sep 2013, 20:41
Flying often brings out the worst. Alcohol exacerbated by an 8000 ft cabin. Folks with an F it attitude because they're traveling. Travelers who are stressed out on a business trip. Entitlement types(Aspen passengers).

Seen them all.

FA's do a great job with almost all of them.

con-pilot
18th Sep 2013, 20:53
(Aspen passengers)

That can include coporate passengers as well. Not your regular passengers, but the 'hanger on's', so-called buddies of the boss and customers.

Limeygal
18th Sep 2013, 21:47
Had a couple of punch-ups on flights. Used to do flights around the Gulf carrying football supporters to and from matches in Bahrain & Dubai. Depending on the outcome of the game, it was highly likely it would end in tears. One of the regulars was a "nice boy" who dressed in an outfit similar to that of Carmen Miranda,minus the fruit-I suppose he didn't like the competition :eek:

Lon More
18th Sep 2013, 21:57
Make them check in an hour early, close all bars airside and stop selling alcohol on board.
Presumably they'd had a skinfull before boarding s why didn't the Captain refuse to let them travel? Because it would knock his 29 minute (or whatever MOL now allows) turnaround for six?

West Coast
18th Sep 2013, 22:41
Not going to happen. A lot of money is made off alcohol sales both in the terminal and onboard. Besides, most handle it just fine.

421dog
18th Sep 2013, 23:12
4 women who got drunk and did unmentionable things to the kitty-litter potty in the back of one of our aircraft. They denied engaging in said acts, and, as the pilot felt no need to check, the plane spent the next couple of weeks in a hot hangar.

.......

Dear God, the stench.

Tankertrashnav
18th Sep 2013, 23:44
They could stop selling drink on the Aircraft or in the Airport.http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/smile.gif


Absolutely! I spent 12 years flying in HM's aircraft, both as crew and as pax on long haul flights without a drop of alcohol, either pre or during flight, and can't see why it's seen as a necessary adjunct to air travel. They managed to get rid of smoking not many years ago and already the idea of lighting up on an aircraft seems bizarre.

Of course there's not a chance in hell of this happening as the airlines/airports make too much money out of the whole business, but it would sure make the flying experience more pleasant for those of us who are able to forego alcohol for a whole 12 hours once in a while.

parabellum
19th Sep 2013, 01:58
Every time they buy a drink in the terminal they have to have a stamp on their boarding pass, you want to buy four drinks, produce four boarding passes, crew check passes of suspects and refuse further drinks, possible?

Cacophonix
19th Sep 2013, 11:01
Of course there's not a chance in hell of this happening as the airlines/airports make too much money out of the whole business


Enough said!

Caco

ExXB
19th Sep 2013, 11:34
Could a breathalyzer be used? You have to put your bag into the template if it looks to big, so why not have your sobriety checked. If you look pissed why not be told to blow. If you blow below 0.5 you pass, if you're 0.5 to 1 you still pass, but are refused booze on board. If you are above 1, you're not on the airplane.

Expensive, probably, but after a few get bumped off the plane people will learn that over indulging will lead to not travelling.

All of this could be done during the wait before the gate opens, so no time wasted.

Or have M. O'L mention to the press that he's going to do this, and immediately the world's media will regurgitate it to the extent that everyone thinks he is already doing it. Just like his other wonderful ideas.

Cacophonix
19th Sep 2013, 11:47
Expensive, probably, but after a few get bumped off the plane people will learn that over indulging will lead to not travelling.

There are laws to deal with excessively bad behaviour so let people be unless they are clearly over the limit or would you prefer that everybody wears a strait jacket and is anaesthetised (nudge nudge MOL)?

Methinks a little perspective is required here! How many airline passengers get carried worldwide every day with little more bother than you would expect in society anyway?

Travelling as an airline passenger these days is a pretty shitty experience so why would an airline seek to deter people anymore than the whole experience of going through security checks and customs and dealing with bureaucracy does?

True some people are pigs but we shouldn't screw the whole system for the unfortunate awful exceptions.

Caco

airship
19th Sep 2013, 12:02
There can be few more "spine-chilling" experiences than when a tiny 40-ish Kiwi FA raised her voice to calm down the exuberances (alcohol-induced or otherwise) of a group of about a dozen Kiwi males "in their prime" setting out on their hols. The whole cabin immediately became eerily silent, the biggest of the Kiwi trouble-makers (probably twice her weight) and the others, immediately subdued by grace of her matronly and timely behaviour...?! :ok:

(This was on the 1st leg of an Air NZ / Singapore Airlines flight to London, Auckland to Sydney sector, back in the late '80s).

Aotearoa, I do miss flying with their national airline. Perhaps one day...?!

Cacophonix
19th Sep 2013, 12:11
You don't have to be drunk to cause trouble on an airciraft.

Many moons ago a ten year old Cacophonix was returning from a mining town out in the desert with a large number of his fellow school going miscreants on a C130 chartered by the company to return the trouble makers to school.

There were many japes and high jinks on board (the kinky stuff came years later) and the hubbub was terrible. Suddenly the Captain emerged from the cabin and seized the nearest young hooligan by his blazer lapels and lifted him from the floor and loudly threatened "to donner" the next person who didn't shut up and belt up. The silence was awesome and later we trooped like sheep off the aircraft filled with awe, all of us wanting to be airline captains.

Caco

603DX
19th Sep 2013, 12:47
The most "lively" flight I have ever experienced was on our return from Libya to Gatwick in the 1970's, after carrying out a full-scale load test of a new highway bridge in Tripoli. British Caledonian, bless them, were running a daily service back then, and my colleague and I found ourselves almost the only Brits on the B-707 aircraft, surrounded by randy and apparently very, very thirsty male Libyans. The Libyan Arab Airlines flight to the same destination was of course "dry", with mainly male flight attendants serving up the non-alcoholic beverages, so the full bar service on our plane, served by the delightfully mini-kilted BCal stewardesses, proved an irresistible draw for the cream of Libyan manhood ... :eek: :rolleyes:

By the time we were crossing the Alps, the normally repressed mob of Gaddafi's finest were in very high spirits indeed, in proportion to the quantity of liquid spirits ingested. The poor girls were running the gauntlet of groping hands on every foray down the aisle, and more than one or two loud slaps were heard above the hubbub. Eventually bar service was cut off, so we innocent Brits were also deprived. On landing at Gatwick, there were uniformed police waiting, so I guess that the cards of some of the worst offenders had been well and truly marked. On reflection, it was perhaps surprising that the FA's on that service weren't issued with tartan "trews" rather than their normal kilts. :rolleyes:

probes
19th Sep 2013, 13:36
innocent Brits! :D

- and if course I read "there were uninformed police waiting" again... what is it, wishful thinking? :ooh:

racedo
19th Sep 2013, 13:53
Remember being on a flight to the sun many years ago on a Monarch flight to from North of England to meet some friends, there were 15-20 guys off on a lads holiday........ clearly there was some sense among them as one young lady (she worked for BA) found herself among them. They were scattered around back of plane.

One guy politely asked her to move stating, "Likely we will be drinking a lot, likely we be be a little bit obnoxious, sexist and most likely we will distrurb your flight. If you happy to move then it ensures we don't upset you and probably anybody else".

Yound lady was a stunner so ended up chatting to her for rest of the flight :E, guys mates gave him so much grief because as one said "Fit bird sitting next to us and you ask her to move" :ugh:.

Think we all enjoyed the flight as they were well behaved and they kept each other under control.

rgbrock1
19th Sep 2013, 14:22
Although a harmless incident by itself the following is a true story.

My 15 year old son is autistic. He has what is known as Aspergers syndrome and, fortunately, is doesn't have it bad.
He also loves flying in aircraft and once seated will proceed to tell anyone within earshot all about the aircraft the SLF are currently sitting on. (And when I say tell them all about the aircraft I do mean ALL: model type, manufacturer, engine type, glass cockpit or not, etc.)

One day several full moons ago on a trip he took with his siblings, his mother and his step-father the aircraft began it's approach to Heathrow. My son is very aware of the different phases of flight as well. Just as the aircraft transitioned to final approach in a great big loud voice my son yelled out "We're going down. Yes ladies and gentlemen, fasten your seat belts because we're going down.... we're going down..."

Needless to say my son's fellow passengers were not amused.