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Fareastdriver
16th Sep 2013, 19:47
I picked this up from the Xinhua website. Very impressive and worth sharing

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee224/fareastdriver/tornado_zpsc27fdfb1.jpg (http://s229.photobucket.com/user/fareastdriver/media/tornado_zpsc27fdfb1.jpg.html)

PTT
16th Sep 2013, 20:23
Is that real? Spectacular if so!

Cacophonix
16th Sep 2013, 20:36
Classic super cell meso with wall cloud. Great photograph.:ok:

No funnel in sight though but clearly shows RFD clear slot. Text book stuff.

Caco

con-pilot
16th Sep 2013, 20:41
Classic super cell meso with wall cloud. Great photograph

We see a few of those here during tornado season every year. Quite impressive.

Cacophonix
16th Sep 2013, 23:05
When a mesocyclone starts recycling multiple vortices and then literally totally touches down you get this frightening but not necessarily photogenic situation...

May 31, 2013 El Reno, Oklahoma EF-5 Tornado 2.6 Mile Wide - YouTube

Near El Reno in Con country...

Caco

dead_pan
16th Sep 2013, 23:07
Classic super cell meso with wall cloud.

I believe the chasers call them "motherships". I saw a very rough approximation of one over Wiltshire last week.

Airborne Aircrew
16th Sep 2013, 23:08
Fareastdriver:

No matter what it is it would make your sphincter pucker a little... :uhoh:

Cacophonix
16th Sep 2013, 23:17
Interestingly enough super cellular storms were first identified and named in the UK despite the fact they are a relative rarity here... (see Wokingham storm).

Statistically there about a 100000 thunder storms on the whole of the continental US in an average year of which less than about 0.1% produce a tornado of strength EF3 or greater...

Don't get me going on this subject, I am a weather bore... ;)

Airflow in convective storms - Browning - 2006 - Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society - Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/qj.49708837602/abstract)

Caco

con-pilot
16th Sep 2013, 23:59
Near El Reno in Con country...



Yes, from about mid-April to mid-June is our tornado season. That is when the highest number and most severe tornadoes occur.

However, we have had tornadoes in every month of the year in Oklahoma, not every month in the same year thank God.

mikedreamer787
17th Sep 2013, 00:11
If I had to redesign a Vogon constructor ship that would be it.

mikedreamer787
17th Sep 2013, 00:17
we have had tornadoes in every month of the year in Oklahoma,

I understand you guys also get Winter tornadoes emanating
from Nimbostratus storms Con. Is that right? I heard Tulsa
was knocked about some years back during Winter from a
Nimbo tornado.

beaufort1
17th Sep 2013, 11:23
This guy has taken some amazing images over the years.

Extreme Instability (http://www.extremeinstability.com/)

con-pilot
17th Sep 2013, 17:07
During some winters is not unusual to have some rather drastic temperature inversions. When this happens we will have snow-thunder storms. Heavy snow accompanied by high winds, thunder and lightening.

On very rare occasions these inversion thunder storms will produce a tornado. However, these tornadoes are never above a category one to a category two level, nearly all are a one.

Now mind you I've never seen one, but for that matter, in the 50 plus years I've lived in Oklahoma, I've never seen a tornado actually on the ground. I've seen a few forming under thunderstorms, but that's it.

Flash2001
17th Sep 2013, 22:23
I saw one of these over Toronto once but lit from the bottom near sunset, all red and orange To my eternal regret I had no camera. No violent weather ensued though.

After an excellent landing etc...