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View Full Version : The computer gurus will know all this, but look at these hard drives.


Loose rivets
15th Sep 2013, 10:22
I've got a photo of one being fork-lifted into an aircraft. I'll try to find it.

The astounding evolution of the hard drive | PCWorld (http://www.pcworld.com/article/2048232/the-astounding-evolution-of-the-hard-drive.html)

Buster Hyman
15th Sep 2013, 11:08
http://aquadoc.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341bf80a53ef010536ba88f7970b-800wi

500N
15th Sep 2013, 11:15
Made a fair bit out of hard drives. They were good business in the old days.

Memory as well.

alisoncc
15th Sep 2013, 18:31
First hard drive I got to play with was an RK05 - 5Mb from Digital Equipment Corp in the 1970's. It had removable platters.

Also remember quoting a client for an extra 16Kb of memory - magnetic core, for a PDP11/34. One of the conditions of the quote was that the client was responsible for making sure that the raised floor could take the extra weight.

Later when playing with Big Iron was invited to a party by one of our big banks. They had just taken delivery of the last drive to bring them up to 1Tb. Must have been a large room full of washing machine sized drives - probably twenty of 50Gb each. At the time they were quoted as being the first site in the Southern Hemisphere with a Terabyte of storage on-line.

fenland787
15th Sep 2013, 18:50
First hard drive I got to play with was an RK05 - 5Mb from Digital Equipment Corp in the 1970's. It had removable platters.
I remember them well, I was working on UKIRT (United Kingdom Infra Red Telescope) on Mauna Key in Hawaii in the '70s.

I had to cart two of them back and forth with our data, by the time they were in a flight-case with enough packing to survive the flights from the UK and a 4x4 drive up the 14,000' volcano they were the size of a small fridge. The check-in folk just loved me to bits!

radeng
15th Sep 2013, 23:00
When I started with my last employer, space qualified ICs had to have the data stored for 25 years. That was done on 12 inch discs......In 2004, how many facilities were there to read them? The factory shut in 2011 - how much of the 1986 data could be read now - even if it could be found?

If paper and pencil had just been invented, they would be the miracle new long term data storage solution!